Talk:Cyberpunk derivatives

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
WikiProject Science Fiction (Rated C-class, Mid-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Science Fiction, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of science fiction on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
C-Class article C  This article has been rated as C-Class on the project's quality scale.
 Mid  This article has been rated as Mid-importance on the project's importance scale.
 

Merger proposal[edit]

I'm proposing merging the Cyberprep stub to here (and the fashion part to cyberpunk fashion). It is entirely defined in opposition to cyberpunk, so is a derivative, and there is very little to say about it, and only one source (GURPS again). Maybe it is even only important enough as a mention as a type of post-cyberpunk? Yobmod (talk) 13:06, 19 May 2008 (UTC)

Agreed and indeed. Seems more postcyberpunk than cyberpunk. Perhaps it ought to be considered a derivative of postcyberpunk? Ottens (talk) 15:12, 19 May 2008 (UTC)
There is so little to say about it that it definitely should be merged and be mentioned as postcyberpunk --Banime (talk) 20:53, 26 June 2008 (UTC)
Most definitely agree. Somehow, that article escaped my attention. I guess there was not much to miss. ---RepublicanJacobiteThe'FortyFive' 23:11, 26 June 2008 (UTC)

The italian link[edit]

The italian link is wrong becouse it direct you to italian page that deals with "Elfpunk"--Wiwi1 (talk) 11:02, 29 June 2008 (UTC)

As the italian wiki doesn't have a "derivitives" article, and this is the only place with elfpunk on the English wiki, i think the link is ok.Yobmod (talk) 16:31, 29 June 2008 (UTC)
At least until out Italian colleagues come up with a proper Cyberpunk derivates article ;-)

The Russian link[edit]

The Russian wikipedia has two related articles:

  • This one - I'm not sure what it's about, for I don't speak Russian
  • And this one - which is about "Dieselpunk"

Unfortunately, two links to the same language wiki aren't possible. So how to solve this? Ottens (talk) 10:57, 19 July 2008 (UTC)

the first one is "techno-punk" (Idot (talk) 15:36, 29 September 2008 (UTC))
I would suggest linking only the one that has sources, ie the second one. If both had sufficient sources, then we would have reason to expand our article and think of splitting.Yobmod (talk) 13:32, 30 September 2008 (UTC)

Nanopunk[edit]

:ru:нанопанк, it:nanopunk  :ru:нанопанк, it:nanopunk

A genre which is very close to bio-punk, but describes the world were use of biotechnologies are limited or prohibited, so only nanotechnologies in wide use (while in biopunk bio- and nanotechnologies are often coexist). The most famous example of this genre is Neal Stephenson's "The Diamond Age". As predcursor of nanopunk could be mentioned some novels of Stanislaw Lem like Weapon System of the Twenty First Century or The Upside-down Evolution, The Invincible (Niezwyciezony) and Peace on Earth (Pokoj na Ziemi). + A genre which is very close to bio-punk, but describes the world were use of biotechnologies are limited or prohibited, so only nanotechnologies in wide use (while in biopunk bio- and nanotechnologies are often coexist). The most famous example of this genre is Neal Stephenson's "The Diamond Age". As predcursor of nanopunk could be mentioned some novels of Stanislaw Lem like Weapon System of the Twenty First Century or The Upside-down Evolution, The Invincible (Niezwyciezony) and Peace on Earth (Pokoj na Ziemi).
It's very nice that third world countries try to write encylopedias of their own, but they do not seem to have any policies concerning verifiability or notability, which are what has prevented nanopunks inclusion on this article.Yobmod (talk) 13:36, 30 September 2008 (UTC)

Wow, that sounds condescending. 71.154.15.130 (talk) 19:14, 24 July 2009 (UTC)

Cyberprep[edit]

Where is the info for this entire section taken from? The only source us some magazine, that probally barely touches on the issue. There must have been other sources, but they probally were not listed. It's incredbly hard to find sources on this through. A quick google search shows nothing useful, but a forum talking about this "sub-genre". Why is there so little info on this? Can we be sure this is a real sub-genre and not something someone made up? I mean it seems real, but with nothing online even mentioning "cyberprep" leads me to have some doubts. This is just something to check up on. no rush - 69.244.100.206 (talk) 08:49, 8 November 2008 (UTC)

I removed the paragraph on cyberprep from the article. It doesn't list any works in this genre... that makes it seem a little suspect to me. If it does exist, it needs a notable citation or two. Meliadoul (talk) 19:20, 14 September 2010 (UTC)
The Truth Machine and The First Immortal by James L Halperin could probably be classified as cyberprep. — Preceding unsigned comment added by Sunioc (talkcontribs) 06:15, 9 September 2012 (UTC)

Sandalpunk?[edit]

Wikipedia redirects here from that term. No coverage? aeonite (talk) 04:05, 15 December 2008 (UTC)

No reliable sources = no coverage in Wikipedia, aye. Google doesn't turn up much we can use unfortunately. Skomorokh 04:08, 15 December 2008 (UTC)
You will see a passing mention of it, along with other derivatives, under the heading "other proposed derivatives" in the article. Apparently, it derives from the wacky folks at GURPS, but there has been little independent development of the idea, at least as far as I have seen. ---RepublicanJacobiteThe'FortyFive' 04:31, 15 December 2008 (UTC)

Springpunk?[edit]

I've heard the term "springpunk" use for what the article calls "clockpunk." If it has any real usage and does indeed refer a more or less simialr subgenre perhaps the section title should be Clockpunk/Springpunk? —Preceding unsigned comment added by 4.240.33.142 (talk) 03:13, 1 March 2009 (UTC)

There are so few reliable sources using clockpunk, that even one RS using springpunk would make it competative for the common term. So if you can find the source you found it used in, i think mentioning it in the clockpunk section would be ok (like: Clockpunk (sometimes called Springpunk) is....YobMod 08:28, 1 March 2009 (UTC)
Alternative-history renaissance would be a good candidate, but Whitechapel Gods is most definitely Steampunk. It isn't the details of the technology that define the genre, but rather the imagery and the culture. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 138.57.212.11 (talk) 21:56, 3 October 2012 (UTC)

Stonepunk?[edit]

How about adding something about stonepunk? An example of which would be "The Flintstones". --130.208.145.201 (talk) 12:14, 9 March 2009 (UTC)

It is mentioned under other. Flintstones could be added if there was a source.YobMod 12:16, 9 March 2009 (UTC)

Salvagepunk?[edit]

An overview here, with the 'bard' here and the 'theorist' here. I don't feel especially qualified to write the entry, nor am I sure that it belongs on the 'Cyberpunk Derivatives' page, I just wanted to bring it to Wikipedia's attention (though if nobody answers to stop me I suppose I'll write it myself). It's possible that the entire 'genre' consists largely of one dude (the Socialism and/or Barbarism guy, Evan Calder Williams), but those other links (the overview and the theorist) suggest it might be getting some traction. Anyone who does choose to write it should not neglect the political tenor to't: ECW is an avowed Marxist. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 96.50.19.37 (talk) 05:52, 23 July 2009 (UTC)

Presuming we are using WP:GNG as the criteria for inclusion in this list, I'm afraid blog entries are not sufficient to establish notability. When articles are being written in reliable sources about salvagepunk, then it is appropriate in this article. -Verdatum (talk) 16:13, 23 July 2009 (UTC)

Stitchpunk[edit]

Stitchpunk seems to have emerged to describe the aesthetic of the film 9, although the fans seem to be using it to describe the creatures in it, there is discussion of a "stitch punk aestheic" [1] and io9 are calling it a new genre [2] and it rolls on [3]. Just thought it worth flagging. (Emperor (talk) 22:03, 20 December 2009 (UTC))

The specifics of the technology are not really that important. That movie falls into the post-apocalyptic genre so neatly that further subdivision seems somewhat arbitrary. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 138.57.212.11 (talk) 21:43, 3 October 2012 (UTC)

Do science fiction of 1920s, 1930s and 1940s classify as dieselpunk?[edit]

I mean for example Metropolis film as well as Alexander Belyayev's novels such as Professor Dowell's Head, The Lord of the World, The Amphibian Man, Air Trader, as well as Alexey Tolstoy's Hyperboloid of Engineer Garin. Or to be classified as dieselpunk the works should be modern but styled for the epoch? Also do various science fiction about Nazi experimentation, Einstains's theories, Philadelphia experiment etc classify as dieselpunk, including such as Return to Castle Wolfenstain and Red Alert computer games?--Dojarca (talk) 04:02, 24 January 2010 (UTC)

  • science fiction of 1920s, 1930s and 1940s - isn't dieselpunk, as science fiction of 19th century isn't steampunk
    but modern science fiction that look like science fiction of 1920s, 1930s and 1940s - is diselpunk
    as well as modern science fiction which look like science fiction of 19th century - is steampunk (Idot (talk) 03:35, 26 January 2010 (UTC))
    So what about modern science fiction about Nazi experimentation etc? Is it a dieselpunk?--MathFacts (talk) 03:46, 30 January 2010 (UTC)
    in general modern science fiction about that time is a dieselpunk (Idot (talk) 05:29, 30 January 2010 (UTC))
  • the question you have to ask yourself for any punk genre is this - did the tech exist at the time? If you're writing a story in NYC in the 1930s but you have diesel powered super weapons that can shoot up to a mile (think today's military guns), then it's punk. If you're writing a story that takes place in NYC in the 1930s and it's about a short dude trying to get accepted for the military... then it's just a period piece. Is Captain America diesel punk? Hardly. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 98.87.155.192 (talk) 06:21, 28 July 2012 (UTC)

Bitpunk[edit]

The following has been removed now by more than one editor, but it keeps being readded. So, let's discuss it. This is not adequately sourced to remain in the article, in my opinion. It is a neologism, and was originally added by a user sharing the name with the person who coined the term, which means this is an attempt to promote the word's use. Until this is in wider use in sci-fi, and can then be reliably sourced, it should remain out. ---RepublicanJacobiteThe'FortyFive' 23:54, 12 May 2010 (UTC)

Bitpunk is a term coined by Bob Doto[1] to describe a genre of fiction that employs motifs based on 1980s technology, including 8-bit and 16-bit, from which the term got its name. Key features of the genre include the utilization of chiptune / chip music, third-wave feminism critiques, an appreciation of gender politics, as well as the sociology of race and ethnic relations. JB Ghuman Jr.'s 2010 film, "Spork," is considered a key example of bitpunk.

I've continued to re-add the post because I feel the reasons given, with the exception of neologism, are all suspect. I coined the term and posted it myself, however, I only referenced myself specifically based on the precedent set by the other entries. When it was eventually taken down for reasons of neologism alone I left it. However, once the article, and term, were picked up by io9.com, a considerable force in the sci-fi world to say the least, I felt the term once again deserved to be added to the page. The term "bitpunk" is sourcable to a number of places, albeit used in slightly different ways, most notably by Malcolm Maclaren, the founder of the Sex Pistols, in WIRED magazine. Not without mentioning, bitpunk is set to be included in the "proposed derivatives" section, which by its very name refers to proposals, and not necessarily (overly) widely used terms. All this said, I do believe the edit should go up, though after discussion, as I feel it does fall into a slight gray area.Bdotop (talk) 12:51, 13 May 2010 (UTC)bdotop

DieselPunk[edit]

Removed the line, "Somehow, open world action-adventure Assassin's Creed series can be included in this genre." from the end of the DieselPunk section for obvious reasons. No Disk (talk) 02:00, 31 December 2010

DieselPunk is not a legitimate genre. What's called "dieselpunk" is actually "pulp fiction."

Pulp Fiction is source material for Dieselpunk, but isn't the end all, be all of Dieselpunk; Dieselpunk also includes much of the Popular Art & Aesthetics of the Interbellum & WW II periods as source, including but not limited to: Hard Boiled Detective novels & Pulp SciFi, Golden Age Comic Book heroes (like Blackhawk), Film Noir & Serial movies, Modern Architecture, Soviet Futurist art, American & European advertising illustration, Robots & Powered Walkers, the plane and jacket art of the Flying Tigers, Swing Music & Jump Blues, Nazi super weapons, Japanese Submarine Aircraft Carriers, Soviet Ekranoplanes, and American Flying Wings, all mixed up together. Freddiefreelance (talk) 00:25, 10 April 2012 (UTC)
Pulp Fiction is in and of itself not a genre, but rather a form of publication. People get hung up on the technology and forget what these genres actually are. Steampunk is not just about steam technology. It is taking the technological and cultural elements of a time period and place and extrapolating them. Dieselpunk does the same thing, but with a different technology base and culture(s).

(UTC)

I am having a problem with Dieselpunk ending with the beginning of WWII, the image depicted show a merge between a diesellocomotive and anf airplane, but the design style of the Diesel locomotive (cab-unit) was not introduced until 1945 with the Baldwin 0-6-6-0 1000, the images one find when googling dieselpunk, show inspiration from the fifties example http://lipatov.deviantart.com/art/KIEV-dieselpunk-hovercraft-140822352 front end of this car draws inspiration from the 1948 Buick Roadmaster http://mikedoscher.deviantart.com/art/Rush-Hour-200023525 http://lipatov.deviantart.com/art/UMAN-hovercraft-257342304 etc.

Dieselpunk seems to continue until 1950.

Jesper Jurcenoks (talk) 04:19, 8 April 2013 (UTC)

Gibson in dieselpunk section[edit]

I removed the following from Dieselpunk and bring it here for discussion:

A 1986 William Gibson short story in the Burning Chrome collection describes this genre as "The Gernsback Continuum", after the works of contemporary writer Hugo Gernsback.

This is an inaccurate description of this story, as the character in the story is not describing a fictional genre at all. The subject of the story is the design style of the '30-'50s period, also referred to as Googie and Populuxe, and in the story called "raygun Gothic." But, this has nothing to do with any genre or subgenre of fiction. ---RepublicanJacobiteTheFortyFive 21:21, 23 July 2011 (UTC)

I've checked my copy of "The Gernsback Continuum" and no-where does the term "dieselpunk" appear, so without reference to an external citation, this is at best original research, at worst a falsehood. I would try to see if it is a reasonable interpretation of the text, but the claim is too tenuous to properly research; the term "Gernsback continuum" appears in the text only as the title. The only section mentioning Hugo Gernsback himself is as follows:

"Think of it," Dialta Downes had said, "as a kind of alternate America: a 1980 that never happened. An architecture of broken dreams."

And that was my frame of mind as I made the stations of her convoluted socioarchitectural cross in my red Toyota as I gradually tuned in to her image of a shadowy America-that-wasn't, of Coca-Cola plants like beached submarines, and fifth-run movie houses like the temples of some lost sect that had worshiped blue mirrors and geometry. And as I moved among these secret ruins, I found myself wondering what the inhabitants of that lost future would think of the world I lived in. The Thirties dreamed white marble and slipstream chrome, immortal crystal and burnished bronze, but the rockets on the covers of the Gernsback pulps had fallen on London in the dead of night, screaming. After the war, everyone had a car no wings for it and the promised superhighway to drive it down, so that the sky itself darkened, and the fumes ate the marble and pitted the miracle crystal...

At a stretch, you could see how someone could equate the narrator's imaginings of what people from thirties dreamed of as their future, and the definition of dieselpunk overleaf, but it looks to me very much like an effort at forcing square pegs into round holes. A spot of wishful thinking by self-identified dieselpunks and the chattering classes. Skomorokh 19:48, 24 July 2011 (UTC)

Teslapunk[edit]

This section needs sources. I've never heard of it or seen it referred to as more than a tongue-in-cheek. Ottens (talk) 16:34, 9 December 2011 (UTC)

This sounds like someone getting extra pedantic about the steam in steampunk (sort of like people claiming steampunk needs to be punk because it has punk in it). I'd suggest removal. ~ Brother William (talk) 08:26, 28 January 2012 (UTC)
Seems like a useless subdivision, but really it is covering a narrow time window between Steampunk and Dieselpunk. The specific technology is not the point. It is a combination of the technology and the cultures of a specific time period, which the author then uses to tell a fictional story that goes beyond the historical material. If Steampunk is focused on the Victorians, "Teslapunk" would be focused more on the Americans from around 1880 to 1920. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 138.57.212.11 (talk) 21:52, 3 October 2012 (UTC)

Teslapunk sources[edit]

from the Teslapunk article

Teslapunk, named for scientist and inventor Nikola Tesla, refers to fictional narratives or visual styles inspired by 18th, 19th, and early 20th century pioneers of electricity and electrical devices. Like other steampunk derivatives, these narratives or styles commonly imagine an alternate history where, in the case of Teslapunk, widely available cheap (or free), clean, and often highly portable electrical energy replaces all previous energy sources (such as wood, coal and oil, and the steam engines that were fueled by them), but has yet to be replaced (or is never replaced) by other energy sources itself (such as diesel or atomic power). In some Teslapunk stories, free-energy technologies are largely forgotten in the present day, but only because they were kept secret by some government or other organization that used the technologies to control the masses. (Or to protect the masses, as is the case with Warehouse 13.)

Items common to Teslapunk include Art Deco styled ray guns, robots, and rocket ships. The "punk" element in Teslapunk usually emerges as a "free energy", "electronically empowered masses" ethos challenges the "energy scarcity" and "fuel monopoly" ethos that was already fairly well entrenched in the United States by 1900. (See Standard Oil.)

Visually, Teslapunk shares much in common with Raygun Gothic.

In a developer video diary, Jose Perez III, lead designer of Dark Void from Airtight Games, called the style of their game Teslapunk.[2]

Captain Swing and the Electrical Pirates of Cindery Island by Warren Ellis is labeled "not steampunk" by the publisher, but called "Teslapunk" by one reviewer linked to Ellis's main publicity page for the book.[3] According to the online magazine Comics Are Evil, "Tesla-punk" is the term Ellis prefers for his Captain Swing series.[4]

Added by Anarchangel (talk) 22:10, 2 May 2012 (UTC)

So there are your sources. Glad I planned ahead. Did not really expect Teslapunk to be deleted with no discussion at all, but that's AfD closers for you. See Wikipedia:Articles for deletion/Teslapunk Anarchangel (talk) 10:32, 15 May 2012 (UTC)
So after all the description of what Teslapunk was, the actual references boil down to one single author's usage. No, can't see what that was killed off at ALL. ~ Brother William (talk) 07:12, 5 September 2012 (UTC)

References

Splatterpunk[edit]

I would like to suggest that Splatterpunk not be included in this article. It has an old history and is not remotely connected to cyberpunk except in being a pulp genre and having the word "punk" in its name. While Clive Barker is probably a big fan of Gibson I see very little connections. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 68.42.69.187 (talk) 21:30, 8 March 2012 (UTC)

Agreed. Finally decided to remove it myself. It's not a derivative term. ~ Brother William (talk) 03:40, 18 May 2014 (UTC)

Decopunk[edit]

Should be synonymous with Dieselpunk if we want to keep our historical periods straight. Also, Steampunk should be set somewhere between the start of Queen Victoria's reign and the end of her son's, King Edward VII, reign. Many people confuse Art Deco with Art Nouveau. Art Deco became popular during the 1930's between WWI and WWII. Art Nouveau became popular during the late Victorian era through the Edwardian era, just prior and during WWI.

Oh, and I second the sentiment about the so-called Splatterpunk. -- Brothernight (talk) 05:12, 23 April 2012 (UTC)


I am familiar with both genres. My point was about the aesthetic in general. What does Sara Harvey get credit for the term? It was my suggestion and it predates her comments on the subject. I made the suggestion in a Talk that has been archived. It seems to have take off to an extent. A cursory search brings up some of the things I mentioned as examples which would seem to indicate someone read my submission. I guess it's a bit petty, but it would have been nice to get credit. Thresher (talk) 02:53, 4 November 2013 (UTC)

Just because something has a slightly different art style doesn't make it an entire "subgenre", it's just a different aesthetic of the same style. The naming scheme of cyberpunk derivatives has, thus far, kept with the theme of a prefix meaning "powered by": steampunk is steam-powered, dieselpunk is diesel-powered, atompunk is atom-powered, etc. "Deco" is literally an art style and distinctly NOT a fuel or foundation material for its technology ("chromepunk" would be more appropriate, but even then, chrome is neither of those things). Does the technology of the supposed subgenre distinctly run on "art deco" or feature technology that couldn't be built without it? Unless you can think of a distinctly different type of fuel other than diesel that powers its technology, decopunk falls under the dieselpunk umbrella. 24.84.192.215 (talk) 20:40, 17 November 2013 (UTC)

Ring of Red[edit]

Hi,

To which genre Ring of Red and its WWII tank based robots could be associated? I've always thought it was dieselpunk but according to date ranges, it should be atompunk.

Lacrymocéphale 23:53, 2 November 2012 (UTC)


Atompunk[edit]

Atompunk is in a list of proposed derivatives but has quite a following now and many active people including over a thousand in Facebook groups, active on mailing lists and even having had Atompunk exhibitions years ago. While it's not as large as Steampunk, I believe it should be an agreed derivative and not just a proposed derivative as it has an aesthetic that people have picked up and is not just a term coined by a single author etc. — Preceding unsigned comment added by Roseofwinter (talkcontribs) 11:26, 31 March 2013 (UTC)

Only if there are reliable sources. ---The Old JacobiteThe '45 15:32, 31 March 2013 (UTC)
There are Facebook groups with links, at least one mailing list and various blogs. Would those suffice? ---Roseofwinter 17:38, 5 April 2013 (UTC)


This page seems to be trying to rewrite history. 'atompunk' has always been called retrofuturism and predates cyberpunk let alone being a derivation of it. Wikipedia should be describing reality not trying to redefine it. 82.69.5.101 (talk) 16:42, 23 October 2013 (UTC)

Sailpunk[edit]

I'm surprised that Sailpunk isn't included, given that it is probably almost as old as Steampunk and older than Dieselpunk — Preceding unsigned comment added by 206.177.43.88 (talk) 19:28, 17 November 2013 (UTC)

Dreampunk[edit]

Seems like an intriguing idea at first, but this basically seems like copypasta on behalf of the two people mentioned in the section (this Yelena Calavera in particular). Compare the opening of the 'dreampunk' section: "Dreampunk" is a fledgling genre of post-modern, dystopian fiction that concentrates on the alchemical power of dreams and the exploration of 'Countercultures'. vs this author description from amazon (http://www.amazon.com/Dead-City-Blues-Yelena-Calavera-ebook/dp/B00EJQZWM2) Dreampunk is a fledgling genre of post-modern, dystopian fiction that concentrates on the alchemical power of dreams and the exploration of 'Countercultures'. So yeah, I'm a sucky wikipedia editor but that seems wrong to me idek Atinoda (talk) 00:18, 13 May 2014 (UTC)

Mythpunk removal?[edit]

I'm suggesting the removal of "Mythpunk". The linking reference (which should now be updated to http://www.theguardian.com/books/booksblog/2008/feb/14/newwomensworldsinfantasy ) only refers to Valente's works by that name and says it's her own name for her works. While the article does mention Goss and Sedia, it doesn't call them Mythpunk, and it doesn't mention Sonia Taaffe at all. A subgenre of one is hardly a subgenre. ~ Brother William (talk) 11:10, 31 August 2014 (UTC)

Tubepunk?[edit]

Somewhere recently I saw a passing reference to something called Tubepunk in a blog or webforum discussion. Might have been in a comment on io9.com or maybe arstechnica.com, I don't really remember exactly. From the name, I'd guess it was probably about a 1950s-looking vacuum-tube-based retro-future world. I'd guess Tubepunk overlaps a bit with Dieselpunk and Atompunk. Anyone else seen references to this? It's new to me, but sounds kewl. :D -- Nomad Of Norad (talk) 00:52, 12 September 2014 (UTC)

Cyberprep->Mind-uploading[edit]

    "Since society is largely leisure-driven, uploading is more of an art form or a medium of entertainment"

This makes no sense! Nobody (incl. in fiction) uploads ones mind mainly for artistic/entertainment purposes. Afaik Cyberprep rather might feature mind-uploading seen from a rather positive light. Such as in Down and Out in the Magic Kingdom maybe. Also I doubt that this could be described as a core feature of Cyberprep. Cyberprep might feature it, in its framework of a rather optimistic and timely (excluding outdated Cyberpunk's conceptions & technologies) view - but it's not really a main element of it - and I'd guess it's not even featured in most Cyberprep works.

--Fixuture (talk) 23:00, 1 February 2015 (UTC)

The term 'punk' is overused[edit]

A lot of these derivatives seem hamfisted. A writer can be as creative as they want, without having to shove 'punk' into their genre label.

Cyberpunk was originally named such because it was about computers, and about the lower class vying for freedom - or, acting like punks. Punk was originally left wing movement that advocated freedom from the tyranny of governments and the upper class, and a punk referred to any rebellious lower class individual - often a young person believing in anarchy and/or individualism. [1]

Attaching 'punk' to the title of genres that diverge into completely different settings is an incredible stretch. You may as well call nearly every novel 'homopunk', because it has humans in it. Even 'steampunk' is silly, in my opinion. [2] Maybe the origin of the term 'cyberpunk' should be explained a little better in this article?

It might sound arrogant for me to say, but I think that too many people misunderstand the term 'science fiction' as well, and they appropriate it to fantasy. Impfireball (talk) 12:15, 18 August 2015 (UTC)

Agree, not sure what could be done though. In some ways they might be related to cyberpunk in that those other genres are sustained by a defining topical center, but I'm not sure how that is unique to cyberpunk and if there are any other characteristics those -punk genres share. The only true offshoots / derivatives of cyberpunk in this article are: Biopunk, Nanopunk, Nowpunk and Postcyberpunk. Actually one option would be to restructure the article appropiately so that those 4 are in their own section (not yet sure what it might be called though?). --Fixuture (talk) 21:05, 18 August 2015 (UTC)
"Punk" has sadly become like adding "-gate" to any sort of political scandal. However rather than being a shorthand for a new event, "suffix-punk" is usually someone trying to get their own niche brand some sort of marketing edge. I'd be all for scrapping Mythpunk and Decopunk off this list at the very least. ~ Brother William (talk) 15:28, 31 August 2015 (UTC)
I think it's really in a number of cases, used tongue-in-cheek, or at least in a bunch of inter-related genres within a certain subset of a particlar style of science fiction. So, "cyberpunk is X and set in Y time period" "Well, okay, what if we write cyberpunk but put it in J time period?" "I know, lets call it Z!" "But, but, what if we put it in H timeperiod instead?" "Well, we'll call it Q!" I don't think it's really a big deal, it's all the same ball of wax with a different colored bow on it. You know, before the 1970s punk subculture came to be, there was the existence and use of the word for quite a long time. Centerone (talk) 17:18, 31 August 2015 (UTC)
It's true it's overused to the point of being a cliché, but plenty of these spin-off words have caught on nonetheless. TV Tropes has a broader overview, and even longer list of variants, here:[4] Robofish (talk) 22:45, 2 September 2015 (UTC)

Clockpunk / Woodpunk[edit]

Is there a distinction between "clockpunk" and "woodpunk"? (Although "woodpunk" seems like a little used neologism?) The article claims that clockpunk "portrays Renaissance-era science and technology", while woodpunk "is largely based in the Middle Ages featuring Leonardo da Vinci style inventions" (which seems like a contradiction, or might just be bad writing). 惑乱 Wakuran (talk) 11:29, 25 March 2016 (UTC)

External links modified[edit]

Hello fellow Wikipedians,

I have just modified one external link on Cyberpunk derivatives. Please take a moment to review my edit. If you have any questions, or need the bot to ignore the links, or the page altogether, please visit this simple FaQ for additional information. I made the following changes:

When you have finished reviewing my changes, please set the checked parameter below to true or failed to let others know (documentation at {{Sourcecheck}}).

You may set the |checked=, on this template, to true or failed to let other editors know you reviewed the change. If you find any errors, please use the tools below to fix them or call an editor by setting |needhelp= to your help request.

  • If you have discovered URLs which were erroneously considered dead by the bot, you can report them with this tool.
  • If you found an error with any archives or the URLs themselves, you can fix them with this tool.

If you are unable to use these tools, you may set |needhelp=<your help request> on this template to request help from an experienced user. Please include details about your problem, to help other editors.

Cheers.—cyberbot IITalk to my owner:Online 12:44, 1 April 2016 (UTC)

External links modified[edit]

Hello fellow Wikipedians,

I have just modified 6 external links on Cyberpunk derivatives. Please take a moment to review my edit. If you have any questions, or need the bot to ignore the links, or the page altogether, please visit this simple FaQ for additional information. I made the following changes:

When you have finished reviewing my changes, you may follow the instructions on the template below to fix any issues with the URLs.

You may set the |checked=, on this template, to true or failed to let other editors know you reviewed the change. If you find any errors, please use the tools below to fix them or call an editor by setting |needhelp= to your help request.

  • If you have discovered URLs which were erroneously considered dead by the bot, you can report them with this tool.
  • If you found an error with any archives or the URLs themselves, you can fix them with this tool.

If you are unable to use these tools, you may set |needhelp=<your help request> on this template to request help from an experienced user. Please include details about your problem, to help other editors.

Cheers.—InternetArchiveBot (Report bug) 22:29, 15 August 2017 (UTC)

  1. ^ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cyberpunk
  2. ^ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Punk_subculture