Talk:Donskoy Monastery

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
WikiProject Russia / Visual arts / History / Religion (Rated B-class, High-importance)
WikiProject iconThis article is within the scope of WikiProject Russia, a WikiProject dedicated to coverage of Russia on Wikipedia.
To participate: Feel free to edit the article attached to this page, join up at the project page, or contribute to the project discussion.
B-Class article B  This article has been rated as B-Class on the project's quality scale.
Checklist icon
 High  This article has been rated as High-importance on the project's importance scale.
Taskforce icon
This article is supported by the visual arts in Russia task force.
Taskforce icon
This article is supported by the history of Russia task force.
Taskforce icon
This article is supported by the religion in Russia task force.
 
WikiProject Christianity / Eastern (Rated B-class)
WikiProject iconThis article is within the scope of WikiProject Christianity, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of Christianity on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
B-Class article B  This article has been rated as B-Class on the project's quality scale.
 ???  This article has not yet received a rating on the project's importance scale.
Taskforce icon
This article is supported by WikiProject Eastern Orthodoxy.
 
Note icon
This article has been marked as needing immediate attention.

Common Grave No.1 section[edit]

The bit on the Stalin-era/NKVD common grave states that the pit was dug in 1930 "for the cremated ashes of executed political prisoners from Joseph Stalin's Great Purge" - and so puts the cart before the horse. Long-standing general usage both among scholars and in Russia puts the beginning of the great purge around 1934/35, after the murder of Kirov. No, the great purge is not simply equal to Stalin's era of autocracy in general, and there's no indication that anyone, even Stalin, knew in 1930 that there was going to be that kind of a massive purge in a few years' time, and that key players like Yezhov, Bucharin and Tukhachevsky were going to be shot. There are other strange and muddled statements in this section (like, the bit about this place being specially shameful to people in the 1930s because it had been an Orthodox cemetery, as if there weren't many thousands of disused former Russian orthodox cemeteries in the USSR at the time - and also, quite a few cemeteries and churches which were still in use!). Not very surprising to find it muddled, since the only source cited is a popular book on cultural sites in Moscow. 83.254.151.33 (talk) 19:02, 3 May 2014 (UTC)

People buried both in Old and New Cemeteries...[edit]

The article states that Faina Ranevskaya, Ivan Ilyin, Anton Denikin are buried in the Old Cemetery, as well as in the new one... Could somebody find out more? --Ivannah (talk) 15:15, 3 November 2014 (UTC)