Talk:French Revolution of 1848

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This has litte to do[edit]

So someone decided that he would add some stuff about Michael Payne's attempt to reform the Edict of Nantes, but then added, in the same sentence, "but this has litte to do with the French Revolution of 1848." Um, what? If it has little to do, it's probably not a useful edit in the first place, seeing as the topic is the blah blah blah. So, um, maybe someone should check that out.

TVTMaster (talk) 18:21, 7 February 2009 (UTC)

1 question ftom class 9. What was the february revolution of 1848 in europe? Arhita ghosl (talk) 18:08, 18 April 2017 (UTC)

A lot of work[edit]

oh my god this needs work: "A banquet was planned for some reason, and other people were going to crash it, but this didn't happen for some reason, so the government didn't fall. The banquet was planned for Paris's 12th arrondissement on the restive Left Bank. It was, however, moved to the right bank with a price increase, first set for Sunday, February 20, 1848, then moved to the next Tuesday. This was so the working people, surrounded by walls, could not watch. The planned crashing of this party was canceled. Law and order would prevail, though the students prepared for battle with firearms. Still, nothing happened that Tuesday. But revolution was inevitable."

i realy appreciate someone writing articles about this, i had never heard of it before.

however, this article needs a lot of work. first of all, you never actually say what the revolution was.

you need to come out of the academic tower for a few weeks and talk with ordinary people for a while. this article is as bad as some of the computer science articles.

Yeah. Wow. I haven't seen something so lame that still managed to be spelled right.Figureground 22:04, 17 October 2006 (UTC)

Well, I just deleted the whole "banquet" paragraph. It seemed kind of incidental, assuming that the poorly-written account of the non-event was accurate. If somebody who knows how to write Wikipedia prose also knows about the incident and deems it worthy of mention, be my guest...otherwise, please don't restore that embarrassing paragraph!

A bit breathless for an encyclopedia, no?

quite, and also at wide variance from other sources, i.e. the number of deaths in the June Days uprising pegged at 10% of that in "A History of the Modern World Since 1815" (volume2) R. R. Palmer ISBN: 0072502827 Published: McGraw-Hill College

I just did a major edit of this page, specifically under the "Second republic". There is still a good amount that needs to be done and I'm sorry for leaving it in such a state. I was honestly very alarmed when I saw this article in it's previous state...indeed quite "breathless" as an earlier post aptly said...I hope that this helps. A lot of details are missing, and the "counter-revolution" still needs to be fixed. I feel bad for leaving it as-is, but don't have time to fix the rest.

-Restheo

Update: I just finished my edit. I'm certainly not the end-all source for information on the French revolution of 1848, so I really, desperately hope that someone else picks this up...

-Restheo

Omnibusses[edit]

there were no omnibusses in 1848. That is the dumbest thing i have ever heard. The first car was made in 1902ish. how could omnibusses be used as baracades in the mide 1840's. its obsurd.

In this context an omnibus is a large bus-like public transport vehicle pulled by horses. 141.155.77.150
An Omnibus is any wheeled vehicle for collective transporting, motorized or pulled by horses or any animal traction. It is correct in this context, as said in the previous comment.

Cleanup for this page[edit]

I don't think this article is too lofty in its wording or content. It does need some grammar and clarity cleanup however. Overall though, very informative.

Les Miserables[edit]

I don't think Les Miserables is based on the 1848 revolution - the uprising in the novel happened in 1832, I think

Requested move[edit]

Article was created as part of larger series Revolutions of 1848 but the article itself is about the Feburary Revolution in France - TheMightyQuill (talk) 20:47, 26 November 2007 (UTC)

Support Unfortunate that February Revolution is ambiguous, with February 1917. (Would the closer please add a dab header there?) The proposed move target is the second best choice. Septentrionalis PMAnderson 20:59, 26 November 2007 (UTC)

PAGE MOVED per request and discussion. I also fixed the dablink and the various redirects. Cheers. -GTBacchus(talk) 19:38, 2 December 2007 (UTC)

Marxist analysis[edit]

I think the obvious Marxist analysis present in this article violates NPOV policy. After all, Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels are quoted over 10 times in this piece, which repeatedly speaks of class struggle and class politics. There's nothing wrong with quoting Marx, but to do so over and over and without putting it into a more modern, post-Soviet context is arguably problematic. The French Revolution of 1848 was an important event, and so it needs to be covered from more than just one point of view. 76.67.164.4 (talk) 07:14, 24 July 2011 (UTC)

Look at these sources :

  • 10.^ "Class Struggles in France" contained in the Collected Works of Karl Marx and Frederick Engels, Volume 10, p. 48.
  • 11.^ Class Struggles in France" contained in the Collected Works of Karl Marx and Frederick Engels: Volume 10 p. 48.
  • 12.^ "The Reform Movement in France" contained in the Collected Works of Karl Marx and Frederick Engels: Volume 6 p. 380.
  • 14.^ "Class Struggles in France" contained in the Collected Works of Karl Marx and Frederick Engels: Volume 10, p. 54.
  • 16.^ Heinrich Gemkow et al., Frederick Engels: A Biography (Verlag Zeitim Bild: Dresden, 1972) p. 131.
  • 17.^ These articles are contained at pages 375, 385, 393, 396, 406 and 409, respectively in Collected Works of Karl Marx and Frederick Engels, Volume 6.
  • 18.^ "Revolution in Paris" contained in the Collected Works of Karl Marx and Frederick Engels: Volume 6, p. 556.
  • 21.^ Marxists.org. Glossary: France
  • 22.^ "Class Struggles in France" contained in the Collected Works of Karl Marx and Frederick Engels: Volume 10, p. 75.
  • 27.^ Note 117 contained in the Collected Works of Karl Marx and Frederick Engels: Volume 8, p. 552.
  • 28.^ Class Struggles in France" contained in the Collected Works of Karl Marx and Frederick Engels: Volume 10, p. 88.
  • 29.^ Note 53 contained in the Collected Works of Karl Marx and Frederick Engels: Volume 10, p. 650.
  • 30.^ "The 23rd ofJune" contained in the Collected Works of Karl Marx and Frederick Engels: Volume 7, p. 130.
  • 31.^ "The 23rd of June" contained in the Collected Works of Karl Marx and Frederick Engels, Volume 7, p. 130.
  • 32.^ "The June Revolution: The Course of the Paris Uprising" contained in the Collected Works of Karl Marx and Frederick Engels, pp. 160–164.
  • 33.^ "The June Revolution: The Course of the Paris Uprising" contained in the Collected Works of Karl Marx and Frederick Engels: Volume 7, p. 161.
  • 35.^ "The June Revolution" contained in the Collected Works of Karl Marx and Frederick Engels: Volume 7, p. 160.
  • 37.^ "Class Struggles in France" contained in the Collected Works of Karl Marx and "Frederick Engels: Volume 10 p. 74.
  • 38.^ "Class Struggles in France" contained in the Collected Works of Karl Marx and Frederick Engels: Volume 10 p. 75.
  • 39.^ "Class Struggles in France" contained in the Collected Works of Karl Marx and Frederick Engels: Volume 10 p. 75.
  • 40.^ "Class Struggles in France" contained in the Collected Works of Karl Marx and Frederick Engels: Volume 10 pp. 75–76.
  • 41.^ "Class Struggles in France" contained in the Collected Works of Karl Marx and Frederick Engels: Volume 10, p. 74.
  • 42.^ "Class Struggles in France" contained in the Collected Works of Karl Marx and Frederick Engels: Volume 10 p. 75.
  • 43.^ "the Eighteenth Brumaire of Louis Napoleon" contained in the Collected Works of Karl Marx and Frederick Engels: Volume 11, p. 103.
  • 44.^ "Class Struggles in France" contained in the Collected Works of Karl Marx and Frederick Engels: Volume 10, p. 81.
  • 45.^ "Class Struggles in France" contained in the Collected Works of Karl Marx and Frederick Engels: Volume 10, p. 81.
  • 46.^ "Class Struggles in France" contained in the Collected Works of Karl Marx and Frederick Engels: Volume 10, p. 80.
  • 47.^ "Class Struggles in France" contained in the Collected Works of Karl Marx and Frederick Engels: Volume 10, p. 80.
  • 48.^ :Class Struggles in France" contained in the Collected Works of Karl Marx and Frederick Engels: Volume 10, p. 80.
  • 49.^ "Class Struggles in France" contained in the Collected Works of Karl Marx and Frederick Engels: Volume 10, p. 80.
  • 50.^ "Class Struggles in France" contained in the Collected Works of Karl Marx and Frederick Engels: Volume 10, p. 77.
  • 51.^ "Class Struggles in France" contained in the Collected Works of Karl Marx and Frederick Engels: Volume 10 p. 79.
  • 52.^ "Class Struggles in France" contained in the Collected Works of Karl Marx and Frederick Engels: Volume 10, p. 77.
  • 53.^ "Class Struggles in France" contained in the Collected Works of Karl Marx and Frederick Engels: Volume 10, pp. 77–78.
  • 54.^ "Class Struggles in France" contained in the Collected Works of Karl Marx and Frederick Engels: Volume 10, p. 79
  • 55.^ "Class Struggles in France" contained in the Collected Works of Karl marx and Frederick Engels: Volume 10, p. 79.

Third French Revolution[edit]

I’m French and I’ve never once heard this one called the “Third French Revolution”. We do number our republics, but not our revolutions. (I suppose the “Second” one is the 1830 one.) I would remove this mention from the lead sentence, but I’d rather ask if anyone has can prove that this is actually used, or if it is used in English. Google’s fourth result actually reads: “If it did work, it might have been called the Third French Revolution.”

This could be replaced by “February Revolution (révolution de Février)”, which is more rare, probably due to the possible confusion with the 1917 Russian one, but does exist. 85.69.140.228 (talk) 12:05, 14 March 2013 (UTC)

europe 19 century[edit]

What was the impact of the february revolution of 1848 in europe? Arhita ghosl (talk) 18:12, 18 April 2017 (UTC)

Marxist point of view[edit]

I've noticed that the Marxist point of view is definitely the most prevalent in the article. I therefere took liberty to add Bastiat's point of view to balance the tone. — Preceding unsigned comment added by Emil Petecki (talkcontribs) 12:01, 17 July 2017 (UTC)