Talk:Garage door

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Stub[edit]

This article is a STUB and should be tagged as such by someone who knows how, which is to say...not myself. 07:01, 3 December 2006 169.233.57.222

caution[edit]

I reluctantly added the statement "The great force on these springs can make them dangerous to replace for the inexperienced handyman." I really wanted to say, "This is a job for the cautious and experienced handyman only," but that sounded unencyclopedic. Honestly, there are a lot of induhviduals who should hire this work out. Farcast 04:52, 9 December 2006 (UTC)

Request photograph[edit]

{{reqphoto}} Edward 11:13, 15 January 2007 (UTC)

There has now been a photograph added. Mak (talk) 15:20, 4 July 2007 (UTC)

Sprotect?[edit]

Does anyone else think this article should be semi-protected? Every time I see an edit, it seems like it's an anon adding a link to their garage door company. It seems to be a total spam magnet, without many people watching it. Does it make sense to sprotect, or is that an overreaction? Mak (talk) 15:20, 4 July 2007 (UTC)

I also believe this article needs to be semi-protected. It isn't an overreaction if the offenders have repeatedly posted advertisements.--Thetaintcleanser 11:09, 25 July 2007 (UTC)

Automation[edit]

I would add information about automation. I.e. automatic closing of the door after the car is out of the house. --Mac (talk) 09:50, 26 November 2007 (UTC)


motion sensors[edit]

could someone please add something about the motion sensors found in most garages. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 75.46.62.70 (talk) 02:16, 15 February 2008 (UTC) Yes!!! We need some one to tell us what is problem when the the door is back up when there is no thing underneath —Preceding unsigned comment added by 70.89.82.73 (talk) 14:04, 31 August 2009 (UTC) That actually can be several issues. One, the sensors are damaged somehow, such as the fact that they do not send the signal properly across the door, or the wires are cut. It could also be because there is a safety weight sensor inside the garage door opener that prevents it from taking the full load of the door if it is beyond its carrying capacity (in other words, springs that are either too strong or too weak). — Preceding unsigned comment added by Tsubasagurei (talkcontribs) 17:48, 20 March 2012 (UTC)

Roller doors[edit]

Added heading in the main article about roller doors. An article exists on Wikipedia for "roller shutters" but this does not adequately cover garage door applications.

http://www.google.co.nz/images?um=1&hl=en&tbs=isch:1&q=garage+roller+door —Preceding unsigned comment added by 118.90.4.55 (talk) 07:57, 7 August 2010 (UTC)

Copyright violation[edit]

Copyright problem removed[edit]

Prior content in this article duplicated one or more previously published sources. The material was copied from: http://texasgaragedoors.net/garagedoorstexas.htm). Infringing material has been rewritten or removed and must not be restored, unless it is duly released under a compatible license. (For more information, please see "using copyrighted works from others" if you are not the copyright holder of this material, or "donating copyrighted materials" if you are.) For legal reasons, we cannot accept copyrighted text or images borrowed from other web sites or published material; such additions will be deleted. Contributors may use copyrighted publications as a source of information, but not as a source of sentences or phrases. Accordingly, the material may be rewritten, but only if it does not infringe on the copyright of the original or plagiarize from that source. Please see our guideline on non-free text for how to properly implement limited quotations of copyrighted text. Wikipedia takes copyright violations very seriously, and persistent violators will be blocked from editing. While we appreciate contributions, we must require all contributors to understand and comply with these policies. Thank you. A412 (Talk * C) 00:18, 17 January 2012 (UTC)

Copyright problem removed[edit]

Prior content in this article duplicated one or more previously published sources. The material was copied from: http://garagedoorchildsafety.com). Infringing material has been rewritten or removed and must not be restored, unless it is duly released under a compatible license. (For more information, please see "using copyrighted works from others" if you are not the copyright holder of this material, or "donating copyrighted materials" if you are.) For legal reasons, we cannot accept copyrighted text or images borrowed from other web sites or published material; such additions will be deleted. Contributors may use copyrighted publications as a source of information, but not as a source of sentences or phrases. Accordingly, the material may be rewritten, but only if it does not infringe on the copyright of the original or plagiarize from that source. Please see our guideline on non-free text for how to properly implement limited quotations of copyrighted text. Wikipedia takes copyright violations very seriously, and persistent violators will be blocked from editing. While we appreciate contributions, we must require all contributors to understand and comply with these policies. Thank you. A412 (Talk * C) 00:18, 17 January 2012 (UTC)

Inaccurate information[edit]

I am a licensed Profession Engineer in the USA who has designed and investigated garage doors for more than 20 years. I am adding this information here because it is not "encyclopedic" nor do I have published references at hand.

In the "History" section:

Overhead Door Corporation patented the "magic wedge" feature in 1921. This was a significant advancement wherein the vertical track was sloped away from the wall by about 1/8" per foot tall, and accompanied by incremental heights of the roller holders (or end hinges) on the sections. This ended the undesireable feature of having the door scrape tightly against the wall through the full door height when opening or closing. It seems that this part of the history should be mentioned, since it eventaully became the "standard" for all manufacturers.

Concerning "Sectional garage doors"

The article states that they are "usually constructed of six to eight panels". The standard height of individual sections is 18 inches minimum in the USA, with 21" being the most common in residential applications and 24" in commercial. Thus, the most common quantity for garage doors in the US is four sections, giving a 7' tall door for homes, and 8' tall doors for commercial.

Concerning garage door materials:

Aluminum and vinyl are listed as some of the "most popular materials". Speaking for the USA, it is a common misconception that the typical home garage door is aluminum. All sheetmetal doors are steel because aluminum is too expensive and dents too easily. The only common use for aluminum is commercial "full view" doors where the door is not a sheet of metal, but constructed from extruded aluminum rails, such as used in bays at auto repair facilities or fire stations. Thus, aluminum is not a "popular material" but a rarely used material in the US. The same is true of plastic. While there are some plastic doors available, they are uncommon. These material should be listed as "available" materials, not "popular" materials.

Concerning life of torsion springs:

The author is wrong, or at least misleading about their conclusions, which are not supported by engineering principles or scientific fact. The life of the spring in a counterbalance system is not affected by weight added to the door, maintenance of the door components, or how difficult the door may be to move from open to closed due to poor maintenance. The cycle life of the spring only depends upon the stresses applied by each cycle when the door is moved up and down. In other words, the spring(s) are going to exert the same pull on the lift cables regardless of the door condition. The author has erroneously assumed that an increased effort required to move the door will somehow make the springs work harder and create greater stress in the springs. Poor maintenance will affect the life of the garage door opener/operator because it will have to work harder to move the door, but the springs are unaffected. Furthermore, adding weight to the door will merely result in the door being heavier to lift, unless the springs are intentionally wound up further to compensate.

Concerning "Roller Doors"

The term "Roller Doors" is apparently a European term. It is not a problem to leave it in place, but the different US terminology should also be included. These types of doors include: "Rolling Steel" (slat) doors, and "Sheet Doors". Furthermore, although the article currently states that "Larger roller doors in commercial premises are not sprung", this is not true in the USA. I have never seen a large unsprung rolling steel door. In the US it is normal practice to always counterbalance rolling steel doors. Unsprung doors have only one device holding them open - the operator motor. Omitting the springs would mean that the door would fall if the operator or the operator's connection to the door broke, and the products in the US do not therefore omit the redundant door support provided by springs.

The DASMA website (www.dasma.com) is the repository for technical information on garage door products in the USA. The published standards and bulletins are the concensus results of many technical professionals in the industry, not merely one person or one company. Accepting citations from a single person as authoratative merely because they published their thoughts on a website does not give any assurance of accuracy, as noted in the "springs" discussion above. ScatesPE (talk) 23:48, 29 February 2012 (UTC)

Thank you for the above information. If you believe anything to be wrong, you should challenge it by adding a {{cn}} tag (appears as [citation needed]) to the material in question (an automated bot will handily add the date in the correct format for you). If no valid reference to support it is provided within a reasonable period of time (say about a month), you are free to delete the material as uncited. Wikipedia requires all material to be properly referenced with a verifiable reference. Such a cite can be a reference work or a web site, but it must have the backing of a recognised authority on the subject. Once deleted, anyone wishing to restore it is duty bound to provide a reference supporting the claim. Further information can be found by clicking the wikilinks in this paragraph.
I regret to say that no matter how good an engineer you are and no matter how impecable your qualifications, Wikipedia does not permit material without adequate references. Unfortunately there are some editors who believe they have knowledge of a subject, but turn out not to be as knowledgeable as they think. This is not intended as a critisism of yourself but just a statement of the way things are.
In view of the large amounts of material that is unreferenced in the article, I have taken a broad approach and added a {{refimprove}} tag to the whole article. After a reasonable period to allow corrections and references, you are free to delete anything unreferenced that you believe is wrong. If you wish to correct anything, then please provide an appropriate supporting reference. 86.166.70.84 (talk) 15:51, 29 September 2012 (UTC)

File:Copper Garage Door.jpg Nominated for speedy Deletion[edit]

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File:Aluminum Garage Door.jpg Nominated for speedy Deletion[edit]

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An image used in this article, File:Aluminum Garage Door.jpg, has been nominated for speedy deletion for the following reason: All Wikipedia files with unknown copyright status

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This is Bot placed notification, another user has nominated/tagged the image --CommonsNotificationBot (talk) 22:28, 2 March 2012 (UTC)

Additional Information on springs and doors[edit]

I am familiar with a website that provides DIY instructions on how to install and or repair various parts of a garage door, including how to install torsion springs and extension springs. However, the website is commercial. The website provides the information freely to the public, and I am able to get permission to cite the information on this page. My question is, since it is from a commercial seller of garage door springs and parts, would using this information as a reference be appropriate? The company is DDM Garage Doors and the website is http://ddmgaragedoors.com/diy-instructions/ or another well qualified and documented company is DIY Garage Door Parts whose site would be http://www.diy-garage-door-parts.com/how-to-replace-garage-door-torsion-spring/ and site owner has also provided permission.— Preceding unsigned comment added by Tsubasagurei (talkcontribs) 17:41, 20 March 2012 (UTC)

1. Links to commercial sites are heavily discouraged (WP:SPAM). Having said that, it is recognised that sometimes the only source of a cite is a commercial website.
2. Wikipedia is an encyclopedia not a 'how to' manual (WP:NOHOWTO).
Thank you for your interest in improving the article. 86.166.70.84 (talk) 15:59, 29 September 2012 (UTC)

Clarification needed[edit]

In the Roller Doors section, there is reference to "an aluminium lathe filled with urethane foam for thermal and acoustic insulation." Like the rest of the article, there's no reference to check up on this. I'm pretty sure lathe is a misprint for lath, but I don't live in the UK or EU, aluminium would be a strange material to use for a lath (especially one that's intended to hold thermal insulation), and I've never seen a garage door that fits this description. Maybe someone who understands this construction can both find a reference, and fix the terminology. I assume urethane really means polyurethane? Larry Doolittle (talk) 06:59, 23 February 2014 (UTC)

Garage Door Spring[edit]

Garage Door Spring - A torsion tension spring is located above the garage door (in closed position). This metal coiled elastic wire holds tension when wound and unwound provides energy for a controlled motion for an opening closing garage door. It holds energy and distributes energy through the motion of twisting. It is a dangerous procedure to replace torsion springs that should be done by a garage door professional technician. The correct springs for the correct door weight will give the appropriate balance. The spring allows the door to open and close. It holds the weight of the garage door and allows the door to be extremely light for manual operation or with a garage door opener. Visit us on the web for more information — Preceding unsigned comment added by Absolutegd (talkcontribs) 20:01, 25 March 2014 (UTC)

Garage Entry Door[edit]

Perhaps a mention and picture explaining what to call the door humans go through is warranted. I came here looking for the term/words for it. http://oi63.tinypic.com/122ya00.jpg foobar (talk) 21:04, 25 July 2016 (UTC)

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