Talk:Gelatinous cube

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Untitled[edit]

Try H.P. Lovecraft's Shoggots("In the allucinating mountains")... THAT'S BEFORE ACTUAL RPGS and before D&D!!!!

Uh...thanks for the kind words. I'd add it, but unfortunately, I know little about Shoggoths or even gelatinous cubes. It certainly is part of the origin of the gelatinous cubes, and somebody who knows more should probably add it.

Superluser 01:53, 17 May 2006 (UTC)

Shoggoths look like gigantic amoebae made of tar with eyes floating on the surface. They look nothing at all like Gelatinous cubes.


Do not put ads for your personal artwork or irrelevant anecdotes on the Gelatinous Cube discussion page. --Valwen 04:40, 9 December 2006 (UTC)

There's an ad for a blog site named Cracked.com on the page currently. That should be removed under the same premise as internet publications are not notable. 2602:252:D13:9C10:B1AA:40DA:E923:267F (talk) 20:11, 27 December 2016 (UTC)

Nearly silent and semi-transparent, gelatinous cubes often find themselves gorged with delectible delicacies made from the frightened, electrofied-bodies of unwary travelers. They are vulnerable to fire, so scorching their broadsides with a torch is one method to send them into full retreat. If this attempt is successful, the experienced adventurer may be treated to a visionary delight, as the g-cube often slides around pits or climbs walls and ceilings in order to get out of harm's way.

paragraph rewritten[edit]

Since it is transparent, the cube can be difficult to spot, and a person in a hurry may find themselves blundering right into one. It is also believed Cubes can cling to walls and pit-sides, allowing it to circumnavigate dungeon obstacles. However G-Cubes are highly flammeable and vulnerable to fire.

I think the above paragraph needs to be rewritten, but I'm not sure how would be best. Any suggestions? FrozenPurpleCube 16:50, 9 December 2006 (UTC)

Nearly silent and semi-transparent, gelatinous cubes often find themselves gorged with delectible delicacies made from the frightened, electrofied-bodies of unwary travelers. They are vulnerable to fire, so scorching their broadsides with a torch is one method to send them into full retreat. If this attempt is successful, the experienced adventurer may be treated to a visionary delight, as the g-cube often slides around pits or climbs walls and ceilings in order to get out of harm's way.

Delete article[edit]

Let's get a grip. This would qualify as one of the less interesting and less visited pages on a D&D fansite. Here, it's a bunch of inappropriate rambling OR speculation, where the number of words in "Other Media" exceed the article itself. What makes this weak, even for a fansite article, is the list of games that use the phrase "gelatinous cube" without necessarily having any connection with the original fictional defintion, except perhaps the name. Example: "Minecraft added an ooze type enemy, known as slimes, that, due to the graphic style of the game are presented as cubes of different sizes." This is just fan original research, and reworking history to make it seem there is some grand tradition behind what may be just a casual artistic reuse of a name. 98.210.208.107 (talk) 18:37, 7 March 2011 (UTC)

Can you tell us how you really feel? 129.33.19.254 (talk) 18:42, 7 March 2011 (UTC)
It's a notable monster in a notable game, and WP:IDONTLIKEIT is not a reason to ask that an article be deleted. Part of what makes the monster notable is that it's been used in many games outside D&D, where it started. None of that is original research, since it's all examples where primary sources are sufficient. PaulGS (talk) 04:43, 8 March 2011 (UTC)

Glabbagool?[edit]

The current season of 5e (Rage of Demons) features an NPC that is an awakened gelatinous cube called Glabbagool. He's friendly and curious, and it's very easy to end up with him tagging along. I'd assume he belongs here, but there isn't really a "notable cubes" section - and also, I'm just a player, and don't own the book he's in. Any DMs out there want to source him in? NekoKatsun (talk) 00:28, 10 November 2015 (UTC)