Talk:Genoise

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Ingredient Ratios[edit]

For a Genoise cake, "On Food and Cooking" lists the typical proportions as 100:150-200:20-40:100, flour:eggs:fat:sugar. The recipe given in the article is more typical of standard butter cake instead of Genoise. Rocketman768 (talk) 16:02, 25 May 2010 (UTC)

Separated eggs?[edit]

The article says this cake differs from other sponge cakes because you don't separate the eggs, but every Genoise recipe I've ever seen has the egg whites beaten separately. If you had neither separate, beaten egg whites, nor chemical agents (baking powder, etc.), you would have a very flat, dense cake, since you can't get that much air into whole eggs. ABPend 04:48, 30 July 2007 (UTC)

  • Well, I've got three Julia Child books, a Cooks Illustrated book, and recipes in both English and French that say otherwise. As near as I can determine, the sugar goes in with the eggs; that, and optionally some low heat, seem to partially denature the egg proteins, allowing them to foam better. It seems like it should be a weirdly finicky process, but given the extreme popularity of the stuff it can't be that bad. Haikupoet 07:41, 30 September 2007 (UTC)

Genoa cake[edit]

I'm confused that Genoa Cake redirects here. Genoa cake as I know it is a heavy rich fruit cake quite unlike the images in this article, also it contains similar fat or butter quantities to normal cakes whereas Genoise is described as having little or no added fat. Shouldn't the two therefore be distinct articles? Samatarou (talk) 12:56, 4 July 2010 (UTC)

Well since no-one else did it I finally split off genoa cake as a new stub article as they really are totally different cakes (though confusingly a few UK sources do refer to the Genoise cake as a Genoa cake too...) Samatarou (talk) 22:05, 22 October 2012 (UTC)

Origins[edit]

Both the genoise and pan di spagna were supposedly invented by the Genosese cook Giobatta (Giovanni Battista) Cabona, who was employed by Marchese Domenico Pallavicini, who was Genoa's ambassador to Spain in the mid-1700s. I don't know where you can find a reliable source to confirm this. Jmc76 (talk) 18:08, 10 May 2015 (UTC)

Pronunciation?[edit]

I've noticed that on The Great British Bake Off, every time this comes up, they pronounce it more like "jen-oh-eez" than the "zhen-waz" I'd have assumed. Is this an acceptable alternate pronunciation in British English? Should it be included in the pronunciation guide, and if so, how (I am not great with IPA)? -DrGaellon (talk | contribs) 19:30, 14 October 2017 (UTC)