Talk:Government of Alaska

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WikiProject Alaska (Rated Start-class, High-importance)
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Divisions[edit]

I have to say this article did not satisfy my curiosity about AK's government below the state level. So AK's divided into boroughs, not counties, right? Not how I usually think of a borough: state, then county, then township, then borough, the latter being a small incorporated municipality with some concentration of population. Are AK's boroughs equivalent to other state's counties?--BillFlis 12:10, 3 August 2006 (UTC)

VP=No Gov?[edit]

I'm trying to determine who will be governor of Alaska if both Palin and Parnell move on to Washington. Anybody know what the order of succession is? Beeblbrox (talk) 18:50, 1 September 2008 (UTC)

According to this, it would be the state's Attorney General, with no one designated as third in line to the governorship. However, in this specific instance, Parnell might have resigned before Palin, as the 111th Congress began on January 3, while the inauguration for VP was January 20. In that case, Palin would have been able to appoint Parnell's successor as LG, and that person eventually would have become governor. Qqqqqq (talk) 19:28, 16 May 2009 (UTC)
After wading through all the legal gobbledygook in that document, some clarification may be necessary in case this comes up in the future. As stated, it's whomever the governor appoints. This may be the attorney general, or it may be another member of the governor's cabinet. Or, as implied in the opinion, it could very well be a state official from outside the cabinet, though I'm not aware of that ever actually occurring. Qqqqqq picked a document from 1997, and specific details should be regarded as being specific to that period in time.
When Wally Hickel resigned and secretary of state (now known as lieutenant governor) Keith Miller ascended to the governor's office, designee Bob Ward was serving as commissioner of the Department of Administration. When Palin resigned, her designee was Joe Schmidt, the commissioner of the Department of Corrections. However, Schmidt refused the appointment, and continues to serve as corrections commissioner. For whatever reason, the Wiki Palinistas decided that this wasn't important enough to mention, instead skipping right over it and proceeding straight to her substitution of Craig Campbell as the designee. RadioKAOS  – Talk to me, Billy 03:43, 10 June 2013 (UTC)