Talk:Illusory superiority

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References 20 and 36[edit]

It seems that refs 20 and 36 are identical?

20: "It's Academic." 2000. Stanford GSB Reporter, 24 April, pp.14–5. via Zuckerman, Ezra W.; Jost, John T. (2001). "What Makes You Think You're So Popular? Self Evaluation Maintenance and the Subjective Side of the "Friendship Paradox"" (PDF). Social Psychology Quarterly. 64 (3): 207–223. doi:10.2307/3090112. JSTOR 3090112. Archived from the original (PDF) on 15 February 2019. Retrieved 29 August 2009.

36: Zuckerman, Ezra W.; Jost, John T. (2001). "What Makes You Think You're So Popular? Self Evaluation Maintenance and the Subjective Side of the 'Friendship Paradox'" (PDF). Social Psychology Quarterly. 64 (3): 207–223. doi:10.2307/3090112. JSTOR 3090112. Archived from the original (PDF) on 15 February 2019. Retrieved 29 August 2009.

--Ateista (talk) 09:59, 24 May 2020 (UTC)[reply]

I believe that ref 20 is to a separate article, but it's referenced in this way because whoever added that bit to this (Wikipedia) article didn't verify its apparition in the Stanford GSB Reporter article directly, instead opting to basically trust that Zuckerman and Jost have referenced that article accurately. Ref 36 is referring to something original to the Zuckerman and Jost article. Anditres (talk) 18:32, 20 May 2022 (UTC)[reply]

False equivalence with the Dunning-Kruger effect[edit]

In the introduction it mentions "The phenomenon is also known as [...] the Dunning-Kruger effect" implying that they are two names for the same thing. They are not identical, however, so this should be made clear in this section: while the underperformers' manifestation of the Dunning-Kruger effect does involve illusory superiority, the Dunning-Kruger effect is also sometimes (albeit not always) considered to comment on overperformers, who underestimate their performance and therefore very much do not demonstrate illusory superiority. Anditres (talk) 18:29, 20 May 2022 (UTC)[reply]

@Anditres: good catch. I've given it its own sentence in the lead. MartinPoulter (talk) 20:50, 20 May 2022 (UTC)[reply]