Talk:In My Lifetime, Vol. 1

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Mase[edit]

Is this the CD that he disses mase? If so which track? —Preceding unsigned comment added by Debo7 (talkcontribs) 01:25, 12 February 2008 (UTC)

Chicago Tribune review[edit]

Transcription using Google News Advanced News Archive Search. Chicago Tribune (Baker, Soren. 29. December 26, 1997) review of In My Lifetime, Vol. 1 (1999):

In My Lifetime, Vol. 1 (Roc-A-Fella) (star) (star) (star). Like his fashion-conscious and mafia-influenced rhyme-spitting peers, Jay-Z goes after a commercial audience on his most recent album. Unlike them, however, the Brooklyn rapper's lyrics contain a finesse and insight few can articulate as succinctly. "Streets Is Watching" expertly dissects and analyzes the hustle and stress of illegal life. His use of pop producers Teddy Riley and Sean "Puffy" Combs will alienate listeners, even as Jay-Z establishes himself as that rare underground rhymer with commercial appeal.

— Soren Baker

Dan56 (talk) 04:53, 6 February 2010 (UTC)

USA Today review[edit]

Transcription using Google News Advanced News Archive Search. USA Today (Jones, Steve. 08.D. November 18, 1997) review of In My Lifetime, Vol. 1 (1999):

RAP: Jay-Z, In My Lifetime, Vol. 1 (# # #) -- The Brooklynite follows last year's gold debut Reasonable Doubt with a rock-solid set with both street and pop appeal. First single (Always Be My) Sunshine, featuring Babyface and Foxy Brown, falls into the latter category. So does I Know What Girls Like with Puff Daddy and Lil' Kim. Jay-Z takes a cynical view of some boastful colleagues on Imaginary Player and puts a sharp edge on Streets Is Watching. He's off track with tepid entries like Lucky Me but easily redeems himself with the album-closing You Must Love Me.

— Steve Jones

Dan56 (talk) 04:53, 6 February 2010 (UTC)