Talk:Kike

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Translation?[edit]

The word for circle in Yiddish is krayz (קרײַז), or ringlen zikh (רינגלען זיך). In hebrew the word for circle is eegul (עיגול). Someone needs to do a little more research before they post crap... untrue crap at that.Lionheart65 (talk) 16:36, 28 January 2008 (UTC)

The kikeleh theory has been extant for several decades, appearing in print in Leo Rosten's 1968 book The Joys of Yiddish. There's been plenty of time for people to raise your objection before. --Rpresser 20:55, 29 February 2008 (UTC)
I can only assume Lionheart65, like so many other ignorant people, is relying on either Uriel Weinreich or yiddishdictionaryonline.com for his translation. Yiddish is a massive and highly expressive language with MANY words, including "קײקל"
http://www.google.mn/search?hl=en&safe=off&q=%D7%A7%D7%B2%D6%B7%D7%A7%D7%9C&btnG=Search
http://www.google.mn/search?hl=en&safe=off&q=%D7%A7%D7%B2%D7%A7%D7%9C&btnG=Search
And search http://www.cs.uky.edu/cgi-bin/cgiwrap/~raphael/dictionary.cgi for circle and be surprised.
Furthermore, you clearly speak NO yiddish, as רינגלען זיך is obviously a verb and hence not the type of "circle" being referenced. This is a case of שרײב א קײקל, not רינגל זיך דײן נאמען — Preceding unsigned comment added by 202.170.84.2 (talk) 04:54, March 11, 2008‎ (UTC)
I am afraid I must agree with the above comment with the Yiddish, But for the word Kike, I have heard it said that the word Kike does in fact mean 'Christ Killer' I may be wrong but I don't think so....You see me being a child of parents who survived Dachu concentration camp and then they immigrated to the USA, I do speak a good yiddish! My upbringing allowed me to undergo a series of fights and scuffles which always lead me to my parents with the million dollar question...."Vuss iz ah Kike oon farvuss rouffen zay meer duss?" The answer allways was..."Zay rouffen deer duss farvuss zay trachtin az meer hubin daharget zayarah gutt.! zay zaanen inganzten meshuganeh goyem, zullen zay alleh brennen in drard mitt oondsareh sunnem"
My parents and grand parents learned the meaning of that word in Poland long before Ellis Island! AMM YESRUEL CHRY! —Preceding unsigned comment added by Shtupper (talkcontribs) 14:09, 19 March 2008 (UTC)
Well... in German "krickeln" is a colloquial term for writing badly (hardly readable like to scrawl, to scribble ). In the term "Seinen Krickel unter etwas setzen" Krickel has the meaning of signature. OTOH a lost of the "r" is not convincing, since the difference between Yiddish in German are mainly vowels. And I've never heard that krickel should mean circle. IMHO the etymology comes from "kritzeln" which comes from "kratzen" which means "to scratch". HTH :) — Preceding unsigned comment added by 188.107.61.232 (talk) 18:27, September 19, 2010‎ (UTC)
While קרײַז krayz (cf. German Kreis) does indeed mean "circle", "ringlen zikh" (cf. German sich ringeln) is evidently a verb ("to circle"). Lionheart65 clearly has no idea about Yiddish, and just blindly relied on this website. --Florian Blaschke (talk) 00:28, 6 November 2016 (UTC)

Earlier than 1904[edit]

This Google Books reference shows "kike" in print in the year 1900. --Rpresser 20:24, 3 May 2012 (UTC)

That's great. I added that reference to the sentence about first useDavid Couch (talk) 18:26, 6 August 2014 (UTC)

Considering Ellis Island opened around the same year as the printing of this book, doesn't this fact cast serious doubt on the Ellis Island circle etymology from Leo Rosten? Shouldn't the article be reworded to reflect this? --Whycantwebefriends (talk) 14:40, 7 May 2016 (UTC)

Usage[edit]

The Usage section should be removed. First it is principally a simple abridged reiteration of the etymology section, second the only significant claim is that its usage is "rare" in the U.S. and "less commonly used" in the U.K. (less commonly than WHAT remains unstated). A simple sentence in the lede is better. I'd say the term is vulgar, derogatory, and applies to ETHNIC Jews...at least that's how I learned it. The only meaning I understood was as a "them" term (ie. "not us", outsider).173.189.75.8 (talk) 12:53, 30 October 2014 (UTC)

Racist Term[edit]

It should be understood that the word "kike" is a racist term, analogous to the word "nigger." A Jew being called a kike is as offended as a black person being called a nigger. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 71.93.43.173 (talk) 12:26, September 18, 2015 (UTC)

We don't need that dubious analogy, but yes, it's indeed offensive. Bataaf van Oranje (Prinsgezinde) (talk) 06:50, 9 May 2016 (UTC)