Talk:Koryaks

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Comment[edit]

You probably mean mongolid and not mongoloid (with the 3rd O), the latter being a serious medical condition and most probably offending for the Koryaks, as it implies mental deficiencies. -- Szabi 22:21, 9 August 2005 (UTC)

Doesn't "Mongoloid" mean Mongol? Besides, I doubt there are many Koryans here, anyway.--68.170.86.111 20:50, 16 October 2005 (UTC)

That’s right, more or less. "Mongoloid" means "resembling the Mongols" and is one of the three old anthropological racial types: Mongoloid, Negroid, Caucasoid. In recent decades, these terms have come to be seen as too imprecise and impractical, and are now rarely used by anthropologists in this sense. Mongoloid still has the meaning of "resembling the Mongols," however. Mongoloid also has the meaning that Szabi ascribes to it, i.e., pertaining to a pathological condition known as mongolism, but in this sense it usually is not capitalized: mongoloid, mongalism. And in this regard, I believe the medical profession no longer uses the term much, preferring more precise names such as Down syndrome instead. —Stephen 09:07, 17 October 2005 (UTC)

number way too low, even contradict number in Kamchatka[edit]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kamchatka

this article claims there are more Koryaks in Kamchatka alone! Well, at least one of the articles must be incorrect?

Evilbu 16:02, 27 May 2006 (UTC)

Bias[edit]

There is some extreme cultural bias in this article that needs to be fixed. Why is there little mention of early, traditional history? Where are a list of notable Koryaks? This article should be put on some list that experts look at soon.CharlesRobertCountofNesselrode 23:35, 26 April 2007 (UTC)

When outnumbered they would kill their women and children, set fire to their homes, and die fighting. Doubt in that. Their traditional homes made from animal skins and its not easy to set it on fire without gasoline or somth... They burned their dead. Doubt in that to. Because there are simply not to much wood in that area. And chukchi, for example, just leave their dead in tundra for wild animals. I belive Koryaks have pretty much the same traditions. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 89.110.23.252 (talk) 21:47, 3 September 2007 (UTC)

The passage in the article currently reads like a classical story of fictional savages. It probably is one. Digwuren 12:39, 4 September 2007 (UTC)

Colonized South America?[edit]

The comment in this article that the Koryaks themselves colonized Haida Gwaii, and then all of North and South America (!) is obviously absurd and should be removed. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 2605:A000:B9C1:1A00:FD7E:B5FF:73E6:5F84 (talk) 15:48, 17 October 2015 (UTC)

Whoever added this has probably been overreading genetic research results. The split between Siberian and American populations goes 20 millennia back, far before the Koryaks or even the entire Chukotko-Kamchatkan family had formed. --Trɔpʏliʊmblah 00:24, 15 April 2016 (UTC)

There's nothing about their encounters with amanita muscaria[edit]

A lot of Christmas traditions stem from the Koryak's handling of the poisonous red and white capped mushrooms Amanita Muscaria; such as the drying of freshly picked Muscaria on trees or putting them in socks over fireplaces at night. They also lived in smaller tee-pee's so during a blizzard, the shaman dressed in red and white would come inside through the roof. One of the traditions involved the mushroom being chewed and then spit into one anthers mouth to be engulfed during meditation. The compounds in amanita muscaria are so strong that they are still active even after being urinated out, so Reindeer may sometimes venture near or inside their dwelling when they smell it.

− − http://entheology.com/research/when-santa-was-a-mushroom-amanita-muscaria-and-the-origins-of-christmas/

− − http://nemf1.homestead.com/files/various/muscaria/fly_agaric_text.html

One thing I should mention is that they don't like it when strangers ask about amanita. Someone's child suffocated when they didn't chew the mushroom thoroughly and the inside burned their esophagus. Another time a female traveler visited and ate them as a substitute for food when she had pneumonia, and I'm afraid the dizzyness and temperature raise caused her death. While the mushrooms don't typically kill people they contain nuero-toxic compounds when they aren't decarbolaxed or dried thouroghly!

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