Talk:Kringle

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In Australia, kringles are made in a shape a bit like a pretzel, and I was told by a Norwegian friend that the name kringle comes from fact that this looks like a letter K or C (he didn't seem too sure which to say) in an old traditional alphabet. Can anyone confirm this source of the name? Andrewa 23:42, 11 Oct 2004 (UTC)


Not Australia but Austria. I heard from an employee at one of the Kringle distributers (Racine, WI) that some Austrian chefs had created the Kringle, but the Scandinavians did not like the pretzel-shaped pastry (extra dough in the middle) and asked that the pastry be laid flat. -bel


No, none of the several predating alphabets have a similar sound for the "K" rune, and besides, the symbolic meaning of these was often negative. According to DSO online, the all-comprehensive danish dictionary, the now defunkt verb to "kringle" means to entangle, which pretty much describes the shape.Dkviking 17:10, 17 December 2006 (UTC)

There's been comment on VfD that kringles were a speciality of a small area in the USA. I first ate one in the 1960s in Sydney, they were a curiosity then certainly but very popular. The shop that made them has now closed, but there are at least three independent bakers in the immediate area that still make them. Bonza tucker, mate. Andrewa 01:16, 12 Oct 2004 (UTC)

The shape predates danish civilisation, in that ancient celtic breads for religious ceremonies were the first to be shaped like a pretzel around the year 1000BC.Dkviking 17:10, 17 December 2006 (UTC)

In danish the word is also used as an adjective 'kringlet', meaning something interwoven and quirky. Whether it is named after the bread or vice-versa I do not know. Carewolf 11:30, 29 March 2007 (UTC)


Note: For the archived deletion debate for this article see Talk:Kringle/delete. -- Graham ☺ | Talk 16:29, 17 Oct 2004 (UTC)

Pronunciation?[edit]

Anyone care to add a pronunciation guide? I'm curious whether it's 'KRING-uhl' or 'KRING-luh'. — Morganiq 20:48, Dec 25, 2004 (UTC)


I grew up pronouncing it "kring-luh", but I also was told this is a Swedish and/or Norwegian dessert. Our family makes them in a figure 8 shape and is best smeared with butter. figure 8 shape if definately wrong, since it's a different symbol (don't get me started)Dkviking 17:10, 17 December 2006 (UTC)

I'm from Racine, WI and we pronounce it "kring-uhl." Of course, we also say pronounce "bag" as "bayg," so I'm not sure if that's the official pronunciation. 70.92.21.128 (talk)Rubinia —Preceding comment was added at 04:57, 25 January 2008 (UTC)

Official Danish pronunciation would be closest to 'KRING-luh' (or perhaps 'KRENG-luh'), but in certain local dialect 'KRING-uhl' may be used. Swedish use 'KRING-lah'.
Mojowiha (talk) 14:55, 3 January 2013 (UTC)
As a Dane, I will add that the R is pronounced differently than in English. With a roll in the back of the mouth instead of the front part of the mouth in English. If I can learn how to type them, I can put up the respective "pronunciation signs", if one wish to pronounce Kringle in Danish? The "luh" part above, is pronounced as "lu" in "lurk". A common ending in Danish. RhinoMind (talk) 23:01, 6 April 2014 (UTC)

Picture[edit]

It's a shame that this article only has a photo of a sign and not of the actual food. I'll actually be getting some kringle in the mail by around Christmastime (woohoo!) so I can add a photo. If anyone is still watching this article and gets this message, feel free to give me a nudge if December rolls around and I haven't added a photo yet (otherwise I might forget and eat it--the kringle, not the photo). rʨanaɢ (talk) 03:10, 3 November 2011 (UTC)

Hello! We are still waiting for the photo :-) Did you eat it before taking a photo perhaps? I agree that the article is seriously missing a proper picture. RhinoMind (talk) 23:04, 6 April 2014 (UTC)
I have bought and photographed a Kringle (of the Danish pastry kind) here in Denmark and will put up some photos soon, if the quality is ok that is. I'll be back with some kringle! . RhinoMind (talk) 21:34, 16 November 2014 (UTC)