Talk:Lincoln Continental

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Continental Mark II[edit]

Dear Morven and Wiki-coauthors,

This is an excellent entry, I have only one remark:

Continental (Mark II) was a separate marque and it should be a separate entry, leaving here just the reference to the said entry. (Otherwise, it would be hard to understand why "Continental" is mentioned in the "List of automobile manufacturers" on its own.)

Regards, --Millisits 21:27, 13 Jul 2004 (UTC)

I think the single paragraph here on the Mark II should be fine, though it might need to be a bit more obvious about Continental being its own marque. Lots of people (incorrectly) think the Mark II was a Lincoln, so they might come to this page to learn about it. We link to the Continental Mark II entry for people to learn more. I do think a Continental (automobile) page should be written and linked to. I might do that later today. —Morven 00:45, Jul 14, 2004 (UTC)

Recent Mark II edit[edit]

I have some doubts about the latest Mark II edit. It misstates the price of the Eldo Brougham seriously--we already have better info in the Cadillac Eldorado article. And I don't believe either Ford or GM ever confirmed that the two cars were meant to compete with each other. The Eldo Brougham, being a four-door and much more expensive, was not a good match for the Mark. The Eldorado Seville coupe was a much more logical competitor. RivGuySC 04:01, 16 Nov 2004 (UTC)

I agree, plus we already have an article on the Mark II and should not go into such detail here. —Morven 08:25, Nov 16, 2004 (UTC)
Furthermore, the addition says that it was the becoming a publically traded company that inspired the creation of Continental, when I've read it was quite the opposite; the publically traded company couldn't take the losses (in terms of accountability, not in terms of not being able to bear them financially) and killed the project. —Morven 08:29, Nov 16, 2004 (UTC)

Mark references[edit]

Even though the Mark was sold as Lincoln Continental Mark, the Mark was a seperate model and has a seperate article that discusses all Marks from the 1956 Continental Mark II to the 1998 Lincoln Mark VIII. While references to the Mark make sense, two sections dedicted for the Mark do not, the Continental name applies to the four-door flagship in this article. Thanks. Gerdbrendel 22:14, 29 December 2005 (UTC)

My folks were friends with a Lincoln-Mercury dealer in the early 1970s - we bought from him a fully optioned 1972 Continental sedan that had been a demonstrator - and I recall seeing brochures for the 1972 models that referred to the "Lincoln Continental" (the 2- and 4-door standard models) and separately to the "Continental Mark IV." That is, the name "Lincoln" wasn't part of Ford's nomenclature for this series, and this may have persisted through the 1979 Mark V, and perhaps later.Gottacook 08:19, 2 November 2007 (UTC)

I don't know how to edit the references list, so here's the "link of proof" according the the light silver Mark V collectors series: http://automotivemileposts.com/mark51979collectorsseriessilver.html —Preceding unsigned comment added by 91.3.113.150 (talk) 21:02, 9 August 2010 (UTC)

Reading this article made me uncomfortable... the guy who wrote the above is correct. The Mark line was separate from the Town Car line, and both continued as such into the 80's. The Town Car was never called a Continental, a term I believe related to the "hump" in the back.

Discontinuation[edit]

Can anyone defend the assertion under the 1998 heading that the car was discontinued "because of confusion with the Bentley Continental"--? I'd like to see the buyer so addlepated he couldn't tell the two apart! :-) RivGuySC 01:42, 19 February 2006 (UTC)

Funny explaination. But I replaced it with the "real one." According to Lincoln the Continental wasn't different enough from the Town Car and LS, even though it was quite smaller than the former and the company's only front wheel drive car in the line-up. Signaturebrendel 01:49, 19 February 2006 (UTC)

Take Me Higher[edit]

Your contribution confuses me. Maybe you could revise it or explain it? Bok269 18:04, 3 June 2006 (UTC)

I changed the wording as the edit was confusing. Signaturebrendel 20:50, 3 June 2006 (UTC)

Coupe[edit]

Information relating to the years of the Continental Coupe as an option should be included.

1977-1979 Lincoln Continental[edit]

The claims made at the end of the 1970 Lincoln Continental section left me puzzled. After G.M. downsized in 1977 the Lincoln Continental was the largest car of the market until Lincoln downsized in 1980. It was 233 inches long rather than 225 inches as claimed. It was 225 inches long from 1970 through 1972 but acquired 5 mph bumpers in front in 1973 and in the rear in 1974 (as all cars did). Thus it was the longest car made from 1977 through 1979. It also had the longest wheelbase (127") and widest track (64.3") of any car made during this period of time. And finally, it was easily the roomiest car made at this time, with 111 and 115 cubic feet of passenger space as a coupe and sedan respectively, along with a trunk having 23 cubic feet of space (by E.P.A. standards). I suspect the author of attributing too much weight to length (no pun intended) and although the 1977-1979 Lincoln Continental was the longest car made during this period, he was not aware of this fact. Width, volume (especially shoulder room), track width and weight are (in my opinion) the characteristics that make large cars large. With the exception of the track width of the pre-downsized full-sized Big Three and the front seat shoulder room of the 1977-1978 Oldsmobile Toronado, all the cars of this period were smaller by these citeria, when compared to the 57-66 Imperials, the neglected (especially in this article) 58-60 Lincolns, as well as the 1971-1976 G.M. C-bodies (and, not counting the tacked-on 5 mph bumpers, these three bodystyles were in fact longer). The Mark V, especially, is an extreme expression of the impactical styling of the time. It was based on Ford's bloated pre-downsized mid-sized platform and consequently, despite its prodigious length (all bumpers and elongated hood) and weight, was actually relatively puny in terms of, shoulder room, headroom, rear seat legroom and trunk space. It earns the distinction of being perhaps the heaviest and longest (and most gas-guzzling) midsize (by E.P.A. standards) coupes of all times. I am a huge fan (not literally) of the largest automobiles and own three (a 1959 Lincoln Continental Mark IV coupe, a 1966 Imperial Crown convertible and a 1974 Buick Estate Wagon). I do not consider the personal luxury coupes of the late seventies (a fad of the disco era) to merit the consideration as competitors for the title. The 1970-1979 Lincoln Continental does however. In particular, the 1974 coupe is perhaps one of the largest coupes ever made. I suggest that for exterior statistics future writers of automotive superlatives read the Standard Catalog of American Cars series (Krause Publications). It is full of misinformation (especially the 1946-1975 edition) but it is a practical starting point. As for interior dimensions, sales brochures, data books, and the Consumer Report's annual automotive edition are the best sources.

Sadowski 18:39, 9 September 2006 (UTC)

1968?[edit]

This is all under the 1968 heading: "Suicide-door Lincolns were used as the US Presidential limousines during the 1960s and into the 1970s. John F. Kennedy was assassinated while riding in a 1961 convertible, which was later armored and converted into a sedan for greater security. This famous automobile is currently housed at the Henry Ford Museum. Another famous event involving this model of Continental was when a brand new 1964 model was mercilessly crushed into a cube in a junkyard compactor in the James Bond film Goldfinger, to the horror of many moviegoers. (The filmmakers were not so wasteful: the moving car is a new 1964, but after a cutaway, the car picked up by the crane to be destroyed is a 1963 without an engine)."

Some of this, such as the discussion of the car in which President Kennedy was assassinated, is covered further up the page. The discussion of the Goldfinger car crushing needs to be somewhere else, since the movie was not made in '68, and the cars involved were not '68 models. 4.243.206.176 02:52, 10 April 2007 (UTC)

Though wherever it's moved, you should probably mention the funny part where they drop the cube from a crushed Lincoln Continental, which must have weighed over 2 tons, into the back of a small pick up truck, which then continues to drive away. Ha. They also destroyed one of those in Animal House.

Image needs replacement[edit]

Hello all...

An image used in the article, specifically Image:IMG 0339 Desktop.jpg, has a little bit of a licensing issue. The image was uploaded back when the rules around image uploading were less restrictive. It is presumed that the uploader was willing to license the picture under the GFDL license but was not clear in that regard. As such, the image, while not at risk of deletion, is likely not clearly licensed to allow for free use in any future use of this article. If anyone has an image that can replace this, or can go take one and upload it, it would be best.

You have your mission, take your camera and start clicking.--Jordan 1972 (talk) 21:37, 4 October 2008 (UTC)

And Takes Some Pictures Of The Back End[edit]

Is a spare tire compartment on the back of the trunk a notable feature of some Continental models? I can't tell from the current crop of pictures.

Tashiro (talk) 05:54, 21 May 2009 (UTC)

Successor[edit]

It was the Town Car that replaced the Continental, not the LS.

Charleyhorses (talk) 01:28, 14 January 2010 (UTC)

The original Continental, yes. The latest incarnation was replaced by the LS. --Sable232 (talk) 04:55, 24 January 2010 (UTC)

Retractable Hardtop? Am I getting old or has everyone else forgotten the "Hardtop Convertibles" made by Lincoln on their Lincoln Continental in the mid sixties? While mention is made of an effort in the early 1950's to build a Continental with a retractable hard top the 1957 Ford was the first production car of that decade to have such a feature.

 In mid 1966, I started work at our local Lincoln Mercury Dealer, Pagen Lewis Motors in Corpus Christi, TX.  The mechanic next to me worked on a Lincoln retractable hardtop while I made a new wiring loom for a new Lincoln that summer of 1966. I would peek over as he worked his massive, he was a huge, powerful oilfield worker, before he moved to the "light duty" job of auto mechanic, body into the tight confines of the Lincoln to release the electrically driven bolts that held the various parts tightly in place. It only took one dirty contact to lock the roof in place. This was in the open position most of the time.
My only reference is my own memory. The car I may remember may be a late 1950's Lincoln of the same era as the 1957 to 1959 Ford Skyliner. I can find no reference to it on Ford Motor Cars site. But some things they may not want to remember.
Back then, the rich ranchers and oilmen used big expensive cars for off road vehicles. 6 month old Lincolns and Continentals would come in for service, with the dash, seat, and floors full of dirt, food wrappers, beer cans, whiskey bottles, food that was thrown from the drivers mouth as he hit a ditch at 60mph ++, and anything else that entered the doors or windows in the previous 6 months since the car was purchased new. 
 The last part was to show how life has changed over the years. Now we throw that trash on the side of the road. Of course some owners will now clean their cars and SUV's by blowing the trash out with a leaf blower into their neighbors yard, the same one they "walk their dog" in.

Luther BrowningBillWilliam (talk) 05:45, 27 September 2010 (UTC)

1958-1960 Lincoln Continental Section[edit]

I edited the 1958-1960 Lincoln Continental section and other sections so it made more sense. The 1958-1960 is a much maligned car that is highly collectible today. It deserved better. Sadowski (talk) 01:34, 4 January 2011 (UTC)

Combine Generations 8,9 and 10?[edit]

Generations 8-10 were all built on the Ford D186 platform. That platform hardly changed over the years. Furthermore the styling changes were so gradual as to be glacial. Wouldn't it make more sense to combine these generations than to consider them as uniquely individualistic as the first 7 generations?

Sadowski (talk) 08:36, 7 January 2011 (UTC)

Agree, but to a point While it is true that all three generations share a common platform, there is a point that needs to be brought up. The 1995 Continental is as different from the 1994 as the 1996 Taurus/Sable are from their 1995 counterparts (or the 1990 Town Car is from the 1989...). While the basic platform was retained, few visible parts besides the Lincoln badging were shared; 1995 also marked the return of the V8 engine to the Continental. In contrast, the 10th-generation (1998-2002) version WAS a facelift, bringing the Continental in line with the Lincoln styling theme shared with the then-new Town Car, the Mark VIII, Navigator, and soon-to-come LS. I didn't have a hand in writing the 9th-10th generation sub-sections, but they do need combining, as 1998 was a facelift, nothing more. However, 1988-1994 and 1995-2002 need to stay separate, as they are distinct from each other, as I have suggested.

-SteveCof00 (talk) 08:56, 7 January 2011 (UTC)

I appreciate the quick response. I've researched this issue in excruciating detail and yet I still disagree. The amount of changes that occurred between 1994 and 1995 were nominal at best. The interior, exterior and chassis dimensions are virtually identical. If body panels are the criteria for generations then Imperial would have had a new generation every year 1959-1963. Power plants don't make any more sense as one of the virtues of the D186 platform was that it could accomodate a wide variety of power plants. And look at the fourth generation of Lincoln Continental. It increased its wheelbase by 3 inches in 1964 and widened and completely altered its body panels and interior dimensions in 1966, and shifted from the MEL to the all new Ford 385 engine the same year and yet nobody is advocating that this constitutes a completely new generation.
I'm going to combine the 9th and 10th generations in the meantime. Unless you or someone else can come up with a more compelling reason I recommend compressing all three. This is going beyond hair splitting. It is splitting the splitting of hairs.

Sadowski (talk) 01:54, 8 January 2011 (UTC)

Real Lincoln Continentals[edit]

As Lincoln Continental has been defunct for nearly a decade now the only reason for maintaining this webpage is from a collector car standpoint. We no longer need images of old 1987-2002 luxury Ford Taurus' gumming up the lead entry.

Sadowski (talk) 00:29, 17 January 2011 (UTC)

Per WP:CARPIX, it is the quality of the photograph, not the subject of the photograph, that determines which photo is used -- your personal opinion of the lineage of certain models of Continental notwithstanding.
Furthermore, Wikipedia exists for general information. Someone who needs information tailored to collectors would visit a collector-car website. And even within the collector-car community, there are no doubt those with an affinity toward Lincoln Continentals manufactured after 1986, and a debate among which Continental is best is something that does not belong in an encyclopedia. IFCAR (talk) 03:55, 17 January 2011 (UTC)
I believe that a steady change of the lead picture, using different generations as long as they are of a reasonably high quality, is the best way to go. If one generation is clearly more important, then use that, but for a car with such a long production history I don't see any need to always use the most recent one.  ⊂| Mr.choppers |⊃  (talk) 05:59, 21 January 2011 (UTC)

re-writing the article[edit]

For the most part, the expansion of the article is going along well, although i do have one concern. There is already a separate article dedicated to the Lincoln Mark series (all of the Marks except the Mark VI have their own article, as well) and this expansion is starting to duplicate it.

The re-writing has also started up another potential question: did the standard Continental disappear for 1981 when the Town Car became its own model? (the Continental was a 1980 full-size car and 1982 "mid-size car", but what about 1981?)

--SteveCof00 (talk) 21:00, 31 January 2011 (UTC)


I recently added this to the Discussion on the Lincoln Mark series article, but since it concerns Lincoln Continental as well I´m adding it here too:

There has always been a confusion between the make Continental and the model Continental from Lincoln, especially since 1968 when Ford built them side by side at Wixom and sold them in the same dealerships. Continental was first used on a Lincoln-Zephyr (at this point still a separate make from Lincoln) in 1940, from 1941-48 it was a model under Lincoln. When the Mark II was released in october 1955 Ford had upgraded the modelname to a Make with its own Division. The Division existed between October 16 1954 and July 18 1956, it was closed down due to poor sales and the Make Continental became part of Lincoln Division. Lincoln Division produced the remaining Mark II´s until May 13 1957 and used the Make Continental on their 1958-59 Mark III and IV. From 1960 the Continental line again becomes a Lincoln model, and the 1960 Lincoln Continental Mark V is the only Lincoln Mark with Continental in the name. Since the 1958-60 models were only upgraded Lincolns and had none of the styling features of the original Continentals, they are not mentioned in later Ford publicity material over Marks, like in this 1977 Mark V catalogue: http://www.oldcarbrochures.com/static/NA/Lincoln/1977_Lincoln/1977_Continental_Mark_V_Brochure/1977%20Continental%20Mark%20V-02.html, hence the expression "The forgotten Marks". When Lee Iacocca revitalized the car lines of Lincoln-Mercury in the mid-late sixties he wanted to use the styling of the first Continental built for Edsel Ford and the Mark II, this was done on the platform of the 4-door Thunderbird and completed with a Rolls-Royce inspired grille. It was named Mark III since it in style was a worthy successor to the Mark II and the Make Continental was also reintroduced. This is visible in the catalogues, when the Lincoln Continental and the Continental Marks are portrayed in the same catalogues there´s always a distinction between them. And from 1976-81 they´re portrayed in separate catalogues. On the back of the cover the Make and Model is written in capital letters like all cars from Ford Motor Company these years. Continental is not an exception.

Some samples of 1979 catalogues from Ford Motor Company: http://www.oldcarbrochures.com/static/NA/Lincoln/1979%20Lincoln/1979_Lincoln_Continental_Brochure/dirindex.html http://www.oldcarbrochures.com/static/NA/Lincoln/1979%20Lincoln/1979%20Continental%20Mark%20V%20Brochure/dirindex.html http://www.oldcarbrochures.com/static/NA/Mercury/1979%20Mercury/1979_Mercury_Monarch_Brochure/dirindex.html http://www.oldcarbrochures.com/static/NA/Ford/1979_Ford/1979_Ford_LTD_Brochure/dirindex.html

1977 Continental Products Facts Book, Continental Mark V AND Lincoln Continental: http://www.oldcarbrochures.com/static/NA/Lincoln/1977_Lincoln/1977_Continental_Product_Facts_Book/dirindex.html

Effective with 1981 modelyear all manufacturers use a 17 character VIN-code: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vehicle_Identification_Number The first 3 digits gives the make of the car, between 1981-85 Continental has a separate code 1MR instead of Lincolns 1LN.

From Fords 1982 VIN-decoder: http://www.geting.se/viewimage/image/299326-VIN_Decode_1_1.jpg

Continental was a separate Make until 1985 modelyear, and for 1986 the two remaining models became Lincolns. The mid-size Continental Sedan became Lincoln Continental and the Continental Mark VII became Lincoln Mark VII. So pre 1986 there were no Lincoln Marks except the 1960 Continental Mark V.

Most of the facts come from these books: The Cars of Lincoln-Mercury, George H Dammann & James K Wagner, Crestline Publishings 1987. ISBN 0-912612-26-2 Parameter error in {{isbn}}: Invalid ISBN.

Iacocca: An Autobiography. Lee Iacocca with William Novak, Bantam Books 1984. ISBN 0-533-05067-2 Parameter error in {{isbn}}: Invalid ISBN.

For the moment all these Continentals are hidden on Wikipedia under different Lincoln pages, and I believe there has to be a separate page for Continental to make it comprehensible. As it is now it only adds to the confusion between the two makes.

Slimbrow (talk) 20:37, 19 April 2011 (UTC)

Fixing the duplication[edit]

Is there a way to go about fixing the content re: the Mark-related cars since as the page is, this basically duplicates the Mark series article on here (it deserves its own space). --SteveCof00 (talk) 03:06, 21 July 2011 (UTC)

Please don't spam your favorite forums[edit]

I don't care if it's a Lincoln Continental forum. I mean, come on guys, this ain't Yellow Pages, Reddit or Craigslist. It's Wikipedia, a totally free encyclopedia. 166.137.242.96 (talk) 05:05, 31 August 2014 (UTC)

"400 Cleveland" ???[edit]

There was never such an engine designation. The 400 was never referred to as a "Cleveland".

Even the Wikipedia article on the subject correctly states "Ford's official name for the 400 V8 contains no additional designations - the proper nomenclature is simply "400."


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ford_335_engine#400

I don't know how to fix this. Thanks 76.168.51.241 (talk) 08:58, 19 December 2015 (UTC)

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Car it was based on...[edit]

In the initial section it is stated that "With the exception of the Lincoln Mark VIII, all versions of the Lincoln Mark Series of the personal luxury cars are based on a corresponding generation of the Continental". But this is blatantly false, the Mark III (1969) forward was based on the four door Thunderbird of 1967. [1]

Restructure of page[edit]

Admittedly, any page dealing with 10 different versions of a car is not going to be short, but I do have a suggestion to make things a bit more navigable. In eventual future, it would be a good idea to start creating pages for some of the different generations of the car to bring the section lengths under control. Ideally, something like the 1939-1948 and the Continental Mark II subsections would be a good idea in terms of size. In need of own pages:

  • 1958-1960 (needs attention otherwise anyways)
  • 1961-1969 (big enough to become its own article)
  • 1970-1979 (see above)
  • 1982-1987 (too large to shrink)
  • 1988-1994 and 1995-2002 (see above)
  • 2017- (build a [good] article before it takes a life of its own)

-Thoughts? --SteveCof00 (talk) 10:54, 15 January 2017 (UTC)

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