Talk:List of stars in Cetus

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Etymologies[edit]

Etymologies listed here don't fit into the table, so please add them in respective star articles with sources.--JyriL talk 20:35, 2 January 2007 (UTC)

  • (92/α Cet) 2.54 Menkar or Menkab [Mekab] or Monkar
    < منخر minxar nostril
    < منكب minkab shoulder
    < (?) منقار minqār peak (snout)
  • (16/β Cet) 2.04 Diphda [Difda al Thani] or Deneb Kaitos or Rana Secunda
    < الضفدع الثاني ađ̧-đ̧ifdac aθ-θānī The second frog
    < ذنب القايتوس ðanab al-qaytus The Tail of Cetus
  • (86/γ Cet) 3.47 Kaffaljidhmah [Al Kaff al Jidhma]
    < الكف الجذماء al-kaf al-jaðmā´ The cut-short (lepered) hand [reaching from the Pleiades]
  • (82/δ Cet 4.08 Phycochroma or Phycea
    < φυκοχρωμα = phukochroma seaweed-colored (the color of seaweed)
    < φυκεα = phukea of or like seaweed (in color); seaweed-colored [referring to Cetus the Sea Monster]
  • (55/ζ Cet) 3.73 Baten Kaitos
    < بطن baţn belly + κήτος whale
  • (31/η Cet) 3.46 Deneb Algenubi [Dheneb, Deneb]
    < الذنب الجنوبي að-ðanab al-janūbiyy The southern fluke
  • (45/θ Cet 3.60 Altawk or Tawk or Tawk Meksura [Al Tawk al Maksuur]
    < الطوق al-tawq The Necklace
    < الطوق المكسور al-tawq al-maksūur The Broken Necklace
  • (8/ι Cet) 3.56 Schemali [Deneb Kaitos Shemali]
    < ذنب قايتوس الشمالي ðanab qāytūs aš-šamāliyy The northern fluke of Cetus
  • (68/ο Cet) ~2.00 Mira [Mira Ceti] or Collum CetiMira variable prototype
    < stella mīra The wondrous star
  • (89/π Cet) 4.24 Al Sadr al Ketus
    < الصدر القايتوس al-şadr al-qaytus Chest of Cetus
  • (52/τ Cet) 3.49 Durre Menthor or Al Durr al Manthur
    < الدرر المنثور al durr' al-manthūur The Scattered Pearls (of the Broken Necklace)
    < nearby star; has a circumstellar accretion disk
  • (59/υ Cet) 3.99 Aquae Abyssi or Abyssus Aquae
    < Latin for "Waters of the Deep" (abode of Cetus)
    < Latin for "the Watery Deep" (abode of Cetus)
  • (φ Cet) Al Nitham
    < النظام an-niz̧ām The arrangement/string (of pearls/stones/stars)

cetus[edit]

In Greek mythology, Cetus (Greek: Κῆτος, Kētos), also called Ceto or Cetea, was a hideous sea monster, a daughter of Gaia and Pontus. The asteroid (65489) Ceto was named after her, and its satellite (65489) Ceto I Phorcys after her husband. She was the personification of the dangers of the sea, unknown terrors and bizarre creatures. Her name came from the neuter noun kētos, "sea monster", which gives us the term cetacean today. Her husband was Phorcys and they had many children, collectively known as the Phorcydes or Phorcydides...

Cepheus was King of Æthiopia (not present day Ethiopia), and the beautiful Cassiopeia was his Queen. Soon after their marriage, Cassiopeia bore her husband a daughter, Andromeda. Cassiopeia was vain and boastful. So great was her beauty and that of Andromeda, she said, that it surpassed even that of Nereids (the Sea-goddess). When Nereids overheard Cassiopeia she became very jealous. She complained to Poseidon, God of the Sea, and demanded that Cassiopeia be punished. Poseidon agreed and summoned a terrible sea-monster, Cetus. "Go to the coast of Cassiopeia's land," Poseidon directed, "and lay waste to the land, and kill the people, and kill the cattle."

   Cetus, in the form of a monstrous whale, set upon his mission of destruction and began the slaughter, working his way up and down the coast.  The frightened people gathered and pleaded to their king to save them.  Cepheus consulted an oracle--one with magical powers who could communicate with the gods when men sought their advice.  The oracle told Cepheus that there was only one way to stop the slaughter:  "You must offer your daughter Andromeda as a sacrifice."  She was to be chained to the rocks on the coast and left for Cetus to devour.  He made the bitter choice of sacrificing Andromeda, whereupon she was chained to the rocks and abandoned to await Cetus. 
   When Cetus discovered the prize awaiting him, he left off his wholesale destruction of the land and began swimming toward the ledge where Andromeda was chained. But then in the distant a figure appeared in the sky.  It was Perseus, the brave son of Zeus and Danae, just returning from a journey during which he had succeeded in killing the dreaded Medusa. 
  He noticed Andromeda chained to the rocks by the sea, and not far away he could see Cetus rapidly nearing her.

In Greek mythology, Cetus (Greek: Κῆτος, Kētos), also called Ceto or Cetea, was a hideous sea monster, a daughter of Gaia and Pontus. The asteroid (65489) Ceto was named after her, and its satellite (65489) Ceto I Phorcys after her husband. She was the personification of the dangers of the sea, unknown terrors and bizarre creatures. Her name came from the neuter noun kētos, "sea monster", which gives us the term cetacean today. Her husband was Phorcys and they had many children, collectively known as the Phorcydes or Phorcydides...

Cepheus was King of Æthiopia (not present day Ethiopia), and the beautiful Cassiopeia was his Queen. Soon after their marriage, Cassiopeia bore her husband a daughter, Andromeda. Cassiopeia was vain and boastful. So great was her beauty and that of Andromeda, she said, that it surpassed even that of Nereids (the Sea-goddess). When Nereids overheard Cassiopeia she became very jealous. She complained to Poseidon, God of the Sea, and demanded that Cassiopeia be punished. Poseidon agreed and summoned a terrible sea-monster, Cetus. "Go to the coast of Cassiopeia's land," Poseidon directed, "and lay waste to the land, and kill the people, and kill the cattle."

   Cetus, in the form of a monstrous whale, set upon his mission of destruction and began the slaughter, working his way up and down the coast.  The frightened people gathered and pleaded to their king to save them.  Cepheus consulted an oracle--one with magical powers who could communicate with the gods when men sought their advice.  The oracle told Cepheus that there was only one way to stop the slaughter:  "You must offer your daughter Andromeda as a sacrifice."  She was to be chained to the rocks on the coast and left for Cetus to devour.  He made the bitter choice of sacrificing Andromeda, whereupon she was chained to the rocks and abandoned to await Cetus. 
   When Cetus discovered the prize awaiting him, he left off his wholesale destruction of the land and began swimming toward the ledge where Andromeda was chained. But then in the distant a figure appeared in the sky.  It was Perseus, the brave son of Zeus and Danae, just returning from a journey during which he had succeeded in killing the dreaded Medusa. 
  He noticed Andromeda chained to the rocks by the sea, and not far away he could see Cetus rapidly nearing her.

49 Ceti[edit]

49 Ceti(49 Cet) might make a good stub article, considering they've found a massive planetessimal reservoir there. [1] -- 70.24.186.245 (talk) 14:26, 10 November 2012 (UTC)