Talk:Love wave

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The articles on Love wave and Love waves should be combined.

Done - Love waves moved to Love wave per naming policy (singular vs. plural). Vsmith 11:52, 9 September 2005 (UTC)

Q wave also refers to an EKG finding often present in people experiencing major myocardial infarction. Since q wave redirects to this page, perhaps a second article or a link to myocardial infarction. 151.112.57.22 20:07, 11 June 2007 (UTC)

=[edit]

Question: If a Love wave travels out from an epicenter in two dimensions, I would think that the amplitude would be reduced inversely proportional to the length of the line that defines the location of the wave. In this case, since circumference is directly proportional to radius, the amplitude of the wave should be decrease according to 1/r, NOT 1/sqrt(r). However, since I am not a wave expert, I may be missing something here. -Andrew J. Zwart

=[edit]

False ?[edit]

The particle motion of a Love wave forms a horizontal circle or ellipse moving in the direction of propagation.

I thought Love-Waves are horizontal polarized shearwaves, so the particles do NOT have an elliptic movement - just perpendicular to the direction of propagation. http://web.ics.purdue.edu/~braile/edumod/slinky/slinky.htm

This is correct. Hence edit.Femtoquake (talk) 09:27, 21 December 2008 (UTC)