Talk:Pearson Triton

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Comment[edit]

I removed the external links to Ensign class and Moyer Marine. The ensign class is a completely different boat designed by the same man but having no other connection to Pearson Tritons. The Moyer Marine link connects with a commercial site that sells Atomic four engines and parts. No relevance.

I also removed the sentence "Note the low overhangs on the bow and stern". With the photo removed this sentence had no meaning.

Minor grammatical changes were made to read easier. --Bcooke99 (talk) 13:47, 15 June 2008 (UTC)

Production Data[edit]

Just a few thoughts. #1 was technically built on spec in 1958 for the December 1958 New York boat show a year before the article states. It wasn't delivered until 1959. #709 was actually built in 1969, two years after the article says the production run was finished. One Triton was built in 1968 (#708). Dan Spurr writes in his book Heart of Glass(2004) pg 117, that 712 Tritons were built. I know he interviewed some knowledgeable people (like Everett Pearson) but I have never heard of any boat after #709. 709 hull numbers were issued by Pearson Yachts but this should not imply every hull # had a corresponding hull. Aeromarine was issued batches of numbers and there is no reason to believe all of the numbers were used. I know of at least one boat that was built out of sequestial order (#101) and there is other data to suggest that the boats were not built sequentially. From that I can only wonder if some hull #'s were simply dropped when an order was canceled. James Baldwin has actually circumnavigated his Triton twice.--Bcooke99 (talk) 01:21, 6 August 2008 (UTC)