Talk:Posca (Rome character)

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Photo[edit]

Needed: A character screenshot to go in the infobox.

Once again, please quit posting this copyright violation. MagnoliaSouth | Talk 01:42, 12 September 2006 (UTC)

Comment[edit]

The commentary on his personality seems a bit speculative and superficial. I imagine there was a class of slave advisors, since Ceaser, Pompey, Attia all have them. They remind me of taoists and are potrayed as being of Greek or at least of purer mediterranean racial stock (rounder heads, shorter, darker skin). It would be useful to have an entry on this class, if they did indeed exist. I remember in readings long ago, that more than a few philosophers were at one time slaves and tutors.


Indeed, plenty of tutors and philosophers were slaves, and Greeks were especially prized as tutors, but I do not know of any historical suggestion of there being a real class of slave advisors. Marcus Tullius Cicero's slave Tiro would definetly have fallen into this category, but I have never heard of him referred to with any such distinction, only as his slave, or later, freedman. I don't doubt that plenty of other intelligent Romans would have seen talent where it lay, but I know of no historical proof, personally. Varlet16 05:42, 5 September 2006 (UTC)

There is evidence (I should find it) that suggests that Tiro might, and I repeat, might have been Cicero's lover. There is varied evidence that suggests that, although not written, some slaves were "upper class", whilst other were "lower class". The first group was conceded some liberties that the second one would not even dream of having. For example, at the beggining of the series, whilst Caesar is in campaign (I can't recall exactly the episode) we see a slave shaving Caesar. This would be a "upper class" slave, since one would not allow anyone not trustworthy to get that close to a quick death. However, latter in the 1st season, is Posca who is shaving Caesar. Quite amusing. It is mentioned in the series that well-cultured slaves were more expensive (as well as slaves with "extra" abilities, like singing, playing instruments, or good teachers), which would or might locate them in the slave upper class. Halfang (talk) 01:19, 21 July 2008 (UTC)