Talk:Sesklo

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Untitled[edit]

Quote:

He discovered that the inhabitants of the settlement in Dimini appeared around 4800 BC, four centuries after the fall of the Sesklo civilization (ca. 4400 BC).

I feel that should read before instead of after. Floris V 20:53, 1 March 2007 (UTC)


separation[edit]

Does anyone support the separation of the article into two - one dealing with the modern municipality the other with the archaeological site? --5telios 10:34, 4 September 2007 (UTC)

Controversial edits[edit]

Anon. user IP 69.108.139.110 has made some edits that, while surely well intentioned, are at least questionable diff:

Current studies of the cattle genome reveal that all domestic cattle have their ultimate source in only two places, northeast Africa and India, with European cattle bearing a preponderance of African genes. Therefore, the early presence of domesticated cattle in Greece attests to trade connections with the Levant and with northeast Africa, as no cattle were ever domesticated in situ from Europe. Genetic evidence attests to the domestication of cattle in Africa around 9000 B.C., with cattle appearing in the LeVant by 8000 BCE.

Actually, the current studies I know of [1] [2] strongly suggest a local European domestication epysode or at least intense admixture with wild aurochs.

The figurines of the Danube and the Balkans appear at much earlier dates (around 8,500 BCE) than at Sesklo, perhaps giving a clue to the origin of the people of central Greece. In the Balkans, these figurines coincide with an increase in population in central Europe after the introduction of farming, with both the crops and animals of the same type as those found in Sesklo, all of them imported from outside Europe.

Don't know for sure but it looks to me this needs to be referenced.

... although no one would argue today that the Neolithic of Europe began in Greece

What's the point of that unsourced claim?

A generation of historians was taught that the Neolithic began in Greece, while archaeology and dating techniques of the last two decades show that, without doubt, farming appeared much earlier in Old Europe (...)

Etc.

This claim clearly lacks documentation and is against all I have read so far.

Most prehistorians today reject the invasion theories in general, as none of the data seem to support it.

Refering to Dimini culture.

Again this claim is unsourced. I know it's a popular idea among Greek nationalists and people who support the Neolithic origin of Indo-European languages but it's far from being any consensus.

For all the above, I'm undoing this edit and ask the author to document and discuss it. --Sugaar (talk) 05:10, 23 November 2007 (UTC)

Hi. I added three references about the work of prof. Liritzis. Nick. I made these changes. --Nikplas (talk) 18:18, 21 February 2010 (UTC)

Greek National Pride?[edit]

The vast majority of work I've seen on cattle domestication is contrary to what this article says. Indeed, Wikipedia's own article on Cattle Domestication falls firmly against the notion that there was an independent Greek domestication event.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cattle

Assessment comment[edit]

The comment(s) below were originally left at Talk:Sesklo/Comments, and are posted here for posterity. Following several discussions in past years, these subpages are now deprecated. The comments may be irrelevant or outdated; if so, please feel free to remove this section.

I don't think it's appropriate to use the word "first" in the sentence about Sesklo and the Neolithic. Sesklo is clearly not as old as Neolithic sites in central Europe, further north. Indeed, Sesklo's dates are much younger than sites in Romania, Yugoslavia, Transylvania, Ukraine and elsewhere. Sesklo is one of the oldest Greek sites, not the oldest European site! And it may not be the oldest Greek site, but merely the best escavated. It is indeed extremely important and well-studied, but I think the word "first" is misleading.

Last edited at 17:51, 22 November 2007 (UTC). Substituted at 05:49, 30 April 2016 (UTC)