Talk:Shakespearean tragedy

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Plot Diagram[edit]

I think that this page should have a diagram of the plot line of the Shakespearean Tragedy , which is /\ meaning it starts off in a bad situation, gets better for the charachters, and then unfortunately one dies.

Elements of Shakespearean Tragedy[edit]

I didnt really find that the article clearly defined what the typical elements of Shakespearean tragedy were. I believe the page should have a section which lists the common elements of Shakespearean tragedy and give examples of it. Lachlan Willis 10:04, 11 June 2006 (UTC)

Structure for page[edit]

I've tried to add some structure to the page... Unfortunately right now the only resource I have on hand is about Shakespeare's love tragedies. I'll try to flesh things out more when I have other references on-hand. Hopefully I've added some structure to make it a little easier for others to add things. Curtangel 20:33, 24 March 2007 (UTC)

Regarding love tragedy[edit]

The last I heard, Romeo and Juliets was too strong, making them defy their parents and throwing the natural balance out of wack. It wasn't that the universe is tragic, but their love is enough to misalign the universe. Resulting in their death in order to set things back in balance. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 71.59.232.211 (talk) 20:43, 1 June 2008 (UTC)

free will and destiny.[edit]

This article seems to me to contradict itself: It says that free will operates, yet that the (anti)hero must move towards their predetermined ending. Please explain how this can be so. Thanks. Gus —Preceding unsigned comment added by 220.253.13.85 (talk) 07:46, 7 June 2008 (UTC) 'I love romeo and Juliet that movie was the best out of all the others''''Bold text' — Preceding unsigned comment added by 81.100.209.52 (talk) 13:08, 14 January 2012 (UTC)

The Tempst Not a Tragedy[edit]

"Two of his later tragedies, "King Lear" and "The Tempest","

I have never seen The Tempest characterized as a tragedy before. It does not appear on the list of tragedies below this sentence, and does appear on the list of comedies. GeneCallahan (talk) 13:05, 30 April 2011 (UTC)

Tempest is not included in another list of shakespearean tragedy in wikipedia Instead, it's classified under comedy. This is really confusing to readers who came to this article from that article. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shakespeare%27s_plays#Canonical_plays — Preceding unsigned comment added by 199.80.248.1 (talk) 22:58, 15 February 2017 (UTC)

Macbeth[edit]

Some of the plays normally considered tragedies are based on historical figures - for example, Macbeth. Vorbee (talk) 19:59, 16 October 2017 (UTC)