Talk:Telecommunications in Canada

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Untitled[edit]

Needs an update, who needs cellphone data from 1997?

Extract[edit]

This extract from the telecommunication article may be helpful:

Sovereignty[edit]

Telecommunications play an essential role in the maintenance of Canada’s identity and sovereignty.[1] The Canadian Government has created law to govern the use of telecommunications. Canada's Telecommunications Act and it policy, which received royal assent on June 23, 1993, prevails over the provisions of any special Act.[1] It has as its objectives :

"(a) to facilitate the orderly development throughout Canada of a telecommunications system that serves to safeguard, enrich and strengthen the social and economic fabric of Canada and its regions;
(b) to render reliable and affordable telecommunications services of high quality accessible to Canadians in both urban and rural areas in all regions of Canada;
(c) to enhance the efficiency and competitiveness, at the national and international levels, of Canadian telecommunications;
(d) to promote the ownership and control of Canadian carriers by Canadians;
(e) to promote the use of Canadian transmission facilities for telecommunications within Canada and between Canada and points outside Canada;
(f) to foster increased reliance on market forces for the provision of telecommunications services and to ensure that regulation, where required, is efficient and effective;
(g) to stimulate research and development in Canada in the field of telecommunications and to encourage innovation in the provision of telecommunications services;
(h) to respond to the economic and social requirements of users of telecommunications services; and
(i) to contribute to the protection of the privacy of persons."[1]

Furthermore, Canada's Telecommunications Act references the Broadcasting Act.[1] In turn, it stipulates that broadcasting plays an important role in Canadian sovereignty.[2] The Canadian broadcasting system, by law, must effectively be owned and controlled by Canadians.[3]

Cedars (talk) 02:10, 29 August 2008 (UTC)

  1. ^ a b c d Government of Canada, Department of Justice Canada. "Telecommunications Act ( 1993, c. 38 )". 27 July 2008. Department of Justice Canada. Accessed 26 August, 2008.
    Note: Republished by Canadian Legal Information Institute (CanLII). "Telecommunications Act". 23 June 1993. Lexum. Accessed 26 August, 2008, 17:47[edit]
  2. ^ Government of Canada, Department of justice. "Broadcasting Act - Broadcasting Policy for Canada - 3.(1)b". 1 February 1991. Department of Justice Canada. Accessed 26 August 2008.
  3. ^ Government of Canada, Department of justice. "Broadcasting Act - Broadcasting Policy for Canada - 3.(1)a". 1 February 1991. Department of Justice Canada. Accessed 26 August 2008.