Talk:Tell Me What You See

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
WikiProject The Beatles (Rated Start-class, Low-importance)
WikiProject iconThis Beatles-related article is within the scope of WikiProject The Beatles, which focuses on improving coverage of English rock band The Beatles and related topics on Wikipedia. Users who are willing to participate in the project should visit the project page, where they can join and see a list of open tasks.
Start-Class article Start  This article has been rated as Start-Class on the project's quality scale.
 Low  This article has been rated as Low-importance on the project's importance scale.
Taskforce icon
This article is within the scope of WikiProject Songs, an attempt to build a comprehensive and detailed guide to songs on Wikipedia.
 

I'm unable to edit the section I want but here's the gist of it...[edit]

I don't know why I can't edit the sentence I want to edit, but it states, "The chord before each stanza creates a unique sound accomplished by plucking the strings in the chord from the bottom string to the top, then straightforward, then repeated."

This is incorrect, musically speaking. In music, "high/low", "up/down", "top/bottom" refer to the pitch of notes (and strings, as these terms pertain to the guitar) and not to where to strings are located spacially. So, for example, the "top" strings are the thinner ones, located farthest away from the player's head (i.e., "down" spacially), and the "bottom" strings are the thickest ones. To play going "up" or "higher" on the guitar vertically (traversing strings), is to go from the lower pitched strings (the fatter ones which are "up" in space - closer to the sky) to the higher pitched strings (the skinny ones which are "down" spacially - closer to the ground).

A less ambiguous way to state the sentence in question would be to use the words "high" and "low" strings and change the sentence like so:

"The chord before each stanza creates a unique sound accomplished by plucking the strings in the chord from the highest string to the lowest, then straightforward, then repeated."


Nick Koutsoukis

Tell Me What You See Singer[edit]

Even though Tell Me What You See features Paul McCartney as the lead singer, my beatles book incorrectly credits John Lennon as lead singer, probably because although Paul McCartney was the primary composer, my book hints that John sang Tell Me What You See and in return Paul sang I've Just Seen a Face. I guess they made a mistake when publishing the book. C.Syde65 (talk) 23:27, 19 April 2014 (UTC)