Talk:This Modern World

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Dr Philbert[edit]

Dr. Philbert, left-wing? Show me an instance. Dan 8 July 2005 05:43 (UTC)

In one strip, I can't tel you the exact date, he strongly advocates Palestinian independence.

Dr Philbert advocates their independence in the strip 2002-04-22, "A Scientific Explanation of the Mid-East Crisis". [1].
He also created the "army of whiny liberal pundits" in the 2000-12-25 strip. It's obviously mocking the pundits, but from that strip he appears to be on the left because he created them.
There may be counter-examples, but I have not come across one yet. --Kevin L'Huillier 00:20, 4 January 2006 (UTC)

From a Liberal POV?[edit]

I don't find this strip very "liberal". Granted, it is currently very critical of Republicans, but that's because they control all branches of the US Government. When Clinton was president, he was quite critical of the Democrats.

The archives are here: [2] and the mocking starts pretty quickly in 1993. Immediately he criticized Clinton's passing of several Republican-sponsored bills, apparently lack of any conviction, "waffling" (he drew Bill as "Waffle Man"), allowing lobbyists to dismantle a proposed health care bill, NAFTA, and probably several others i skimmed past. Later he criticizes Clinton for the V-Chip instead of more important social issues. Another strip points out that we should not be praising Clinton for the botched job in Kosovo, and then mocks him for his "resolve conflicts with words, not violence" response to the Littleton Massacre while bombs were still falling in Kosovo.

Obviously Gore was not criticized as much since he lost the 2000 election, but during the campaigning Gore was made fun of quite a bit as well.

After the election he wrote a strip with a mad scientist who created "an army of whiny liberal pundits" who complain that Nader caused Gore to lose and chant "I hope you're happy now". The straight man tries to point out that it's lunacy to think there were no other factors.

I think it's fairly clear from these examples and others that Tom Tomorrow is quite happy to make fun of any public figure who deserves it, regardless of party. --Kevin L'Huillier 00:20, 4 January 2006 (UTC)

Okay, I looked through some archives of old interviews and such. Very little about how Tom views himself politically. I did find an interview which mentioned he voted for Nader because he was very unhappy with Clinton's administration. I get the feeling he is against the Republican party, but _does_ speak out against the Democrats when he feels they are wrong.

I guess this could mean he is liberal while still being critical of the Democratic party. But liberal nowadays is pretty much tied to the Democrats, while Tom criticizes them. Perhaps a better phrasing is in order. More as I find it. --Kevin L'Huillier 03:56, 5 January 2006 (UTC)

Tomorrow is definitely a liberal, but he is generally ideological, rather than partisan. His criticism of Democrats is almost always to point out hypocrisy, strategic blunders, or conservative leanings - he rarely, if ever, criticizes liberals for being liberal, wheras he frequently attacks conservatism for its own sake. --67.62.109.178 18:48, 10 May 2006 (UTC)

For example, here is a strip criticising the Democratic party for nominating bland presidential candidates. Pimlottc 21:46, 26 June 2006 (UTC)

Obama caricature[edit]

He's the wishy-washy "Middle Man"... AnonMoos (talk) 16:13, 18 October 2012 (UTC)