Talk:Titan Wind Project

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Production[edit]

I'm not sure why you're comparing to North Dakota consumption, but your math is correct and I agree with your assessment that 25% Capacity factor is conservative. Based on what I've read and wind maps I've seen, a capacity factor of 40-45% would likely be where this project is at, and 50% wouldn't suprise me. --71.214.221.153 (talk) 01:07, 20 March 2010 (UTC)

The 'average' capacity factor for newer installations in 2008 was 35%. These are Liberty turbines, and are supposedly more efficient than typical. Also the location has higher class winds than Iowa, where many of the installations were that averaged to 35%. So 25% is indeed very conservative. 35% is even conservative. See 2008 Wind Technologies Market Report. --71.214.221.153 (talk) 03:18, 24 April 2010 (UTC)

Update - recent wind generation installations (since 2010) in the state have achieved capacity factors in excess of 50 percent. A 45% capacity factor would now be a reasonable number to use for the calculation.--Aflafla1 (talk) 06:22, 24 October 2013 (UTC)