Talk:Torch

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Biblical References[edit]

I feel uncomfortable about leaving large chunks of Biblical scripture in this article, especially scripture with only a passing reference to the main subject. Therefore, I'm placing it here until we can decide what to do with it. -- Storm

This is an article from the public domain Easton's Bible Dictionary, originally published in 1897.

This article is written from a nineteenth century Christian viewpoint, and may not reflect modern opinions or recent discoveries in Biblical scholarship. Please help the Wikipedia by bringing this article up to date.

Torches - On the night of his betrayal, when Jesus was in the garden of Gethsemane, Judas, "having received a band of men and officers from the chief priests and Pharisees, cometh thither with lanterns and torches and weapons" (John 18:1-3). Although it was the time of full moon, yet in the valley of the Kidron "there fell great, deep shadows from the declivity of the mountain and projecting rocks; there were there caverns and grottos, into which a fugitive might retreat; finally, there were probably a garden-house and tower, into whose gloom it might be necessary for a searcher to throw light around." Lange's Commentary. (Nahum 2:3, "torches," Revised Version, "steel," probably should be "scythes" for war-chariots.)

Samson caught foxes, tied them together in pairs, attached a torch to each pair, and let them loose in Philistine grainfields. See Judges 15.

From Easton's Bible Dictionary (1897)


The Torch.[edit]

On the television show Smallville there is a newspaper called The Torch.

--Relaxation 20:06, 29 Jan 2005 (UTC)

External Links[edit]

Both of these pictures seem to be less "torches" than lanterns on poles. I'm inclined to remove them.
*Septegram*Talk*Contributions* 15:13, 26 February 2007 (UTC)

EXTERNAL LINKS ARE BROKEN. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 206.167.216.8 (talk) 16:29, 31 July 2014 (UTC)

Carry a torch for[edit]

If it's a wedding tradition.. uh.. those are both dudes in that statue. Well, one of them appears to be extremely hypogonadic, but.. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 75.73.70.113 (talk) 00:48, 16 May 2010 (UTC)

They're not getting married; they're gods presiding over the process. The god of love is passing the torch to the god of marriage, or something like that. —Toby Bartels (talk) 16:34, 23 November 2014 (UTC)

Duration[edit]

How long does a torch burns? --Piotr Konieczny aka Prokonsul Piotrus| talk 19:52, 13 March 2011 (UTC)


User Jaibhim forcing pictures from his community into the article[edit]

user Jaibhim is constantly posting pictures related with a community he is affiliated to, hence the images have been removed under Wikipedia:Conflict of interest Wikipedia:Vested interestNickelroy (talk) 00:09, 22 April 2014 (UTC)

Nickelroy is vandalizing by removing Torch photograph[edit]

Nickelroy is constantly vandalizing Wikipedia articles. This user never followed WP:BRD. This user is contentiously Wikipedia:Harassment doing for me. This user never stated particular reasons for removing following photograph which is very much relevant to this article. For removing any information follow WP:BRD because image fulfill wiki policies and very much relevant to this article.Discuss on talk page if image is irreverent for this article.

Namantar Shahid Stambh is martyrs monolith erected in memory of the valour and the sacrifice of Dalit martyrs who sacrificed their lives during Namantar Andolan in India has torch-bearing arm on it.

JAIBHIM5 (talk) 19:17, 25 April 2014 (UTC)

@JAIBHIM5: This article is already illustrated with pictures of torches. The image that you have inserted several times gives no added value to this article. It appears to give WIKIPEDIA: Undue Weight to "the sacrifice of Dalit martyrs who sacrificed their lives during Namantar Andolan" in the context of this article. I have removed it because WIKIPEDIA follows a neutral point of view policy and does not allow promotion. Please see WP:NOTADVERTISING, WP:UNDUE, WP:NPOV. Best regards JimRenge (talk) 16:35, 28 April 2014 (UTC)

Vandalism in September[edit]

This article suffered a sustained attack of vandalism in 2014 September by various IPs beginning with 87. Most of these were reverted immediately, but a few slipped through. I believe that I got them all now. —Toby Bartels (talk) 16:48, 23 November 2014 (UTC)

Torch in the UK[edit]

What do the British call this sort of torch to distinguish it from a flashlight? tahc chat 03:19, 25 December 2017 (UTC)

Found several words to describe the American sense of torch from OED:

History[edit]

"Torch construction" should probably be renamed "History and torch construction".

The section should probably start somewhat like the section on the oil lamp.

I found this reference that may help; it reprints from Bulletin of Primitive Technology regarding the history of North American torches

Don't think the section needs renaming as the subject is all about torch construction not about the history of torches. Reference looks good though so please add relevant text and use this. Robynthehode (talk) 22:24, 5 October 2018 (UTC)

Is any of this true?[edit]

I'm beginning to learn through various YouTube demonstrations and simple common sense that torches are not viable light sources. They burn quickly, making them expensive to be placed and replaced for long periods of time in one place; give off acrid smoke, which would make them unsuitable for indoor use; and simply not necessary, since you could just as easily use a cheaper candle or simply use moonlight or starlight, which wouldn't blind you if that type of light was in your field of vision. Open flames would also be dangerous. Does any of the information on this entire page have a basis? I know it says that citations are needed, but that's an understatement—the existing sources are mainly based on dictionaries. Abelhawk (talk) 22:02, 10 May 2019 (UTC)