Talk:Uncle Meat

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yeah.. so fix this already! four years later the same error still exists? come on already!!!!! Ski mohawk (talk) 09:06, 24 January 2016 (UTC) yeah! == well.. this is kind of strange, but I just read the article and noticed the same error still exists after my pointing it out no less than four YEARS ago: "3. "Nine Types of Industrial Pollution" (Listed as "400 Days of the Year" on the label of the original vinyl release) " again, I bought my first copy at the B&I Record Shop (I previously said 1968, but I will concede it must have been 1969) and the track was titled 'Nine Types of Industrial Pollution' on the original vinyl LP. so correct it already! there was no "400 days of the year' mentioned on the original LP - somebody got their wires crossed there. thanks! Ski_Mohawk 01/24/16 01:00 AM PST * 09:01, 24 January 2016 (UTC)09:01, 24 January 2016 (UTC)09:01, 24 January 2016 (UTC)~~ Ski mohawk (talk) 09:01, 24 January 2016 (UTC) yeah! yeah! yeah! yeah! yeah!

You people are hopeless[edit]

So I make an edit in this article to eliminate a incorrect translation, and not only is it reverted back to the incorrect translation (twice; I left a link to the actual lyrics the second time in responding to the idiot that can't seem to pull his head out) but I now see the article "doesn't cite any references or sources." Well, no wonder. If you're going to pull information out of your ass, you can't very well source it, can you? Go ahead and pretend you're actually writing an error-free entry. This article is another example of why so many people distrust Wikipedia. I don't believe half of what I read here anymore. I'll give it one day before I check to see that the thin-skinned "editor" of this article has removed this. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 66.189.180.66 (talk) 20:19, 4 February 2010 (UTC)

I find the current (shorter) translation easier to understand and fully sufficient to get an idea of the meaning. And the current version says "meaning", not "translating literally to", so I think the current version should be kept. For linguistic details (which don't belong into the article IMHO)http://forum.wordreference.com/showthread.php?t=189340 may be interesting. BNutzer (talk) 21:55, 4 February 2010 (UTC)
i added the "article needs references and sources" tag, because, well, it does. This is no reflection on your little translational spat, it's just in line with WP policy. tomasz. 13:25, 7 February 2010 (UTC)

There are a couple errors in the article: "9 Types of Industrial Pollution" WAS correctly titled on the original LP release. I bought my copy in 1968 at the B&I record shop. Perhaps the author had a re-issue version of the original vinyl. "King Kong" was ONE continuous 18-minute track on side 4, which was the reason I bought the album. It's also ONE continuous 18-minute track on the cassette tape a buddy found for me ( he ordered it from Barking Pumpkin records. ) Cheers! Ski mohawk (talk) 00:52, 11 October 2011 (UTC) Ski_Mohawk 10/10/11

Inaccuracies from the Lowe book[edit]

Some untruths spread by the Kelly Fisher Lowe book are parrotted in this article without attempt at independent verification.

Lowe's book is at odds with statements made by Zappa, himself. For instance, Lowe talks about Don Preston playing synthesizers on the Uncle Meat album; but in his liner notes, Zappa makes a point of specifically stating, on the album jacket, that no synthesizers were used anywhere in any of the music of the album. And Don Preston is credited in the albumnotes as playing; "Don (Dom De Wild) Preston – electric piano, tarot cards, brown rice".

I would like to see Lowe's documentation for saying that Preston was using Moog synthesizers on tracks like Dog Breath in the Year of the Plague. Zappa made such a point of saying "no synthesizers were used" that I suspect this is mere speculation on Lowe's part. If true, Lowe should have at least acknowledged Zappa's statements and offered this information as a "correction." rowley (talk) 20:12, 11 April 2012 (UTC)