Talk:United States Preventive Services Task Force

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AMA resolution, House bill[edit]

the AMA makes a lot of resolutions that don't actually do anything. I am loath to include them unless there is significant RS coverage of this fact, which I expect there may be. The bill in question also likely has coverage in RS that can paint it as a response to the PSA test controversy. I do not have time to search for either. -- [ UseTheCommandLine ~/talk ] # _ 01:02, 5 April 2013 (UTC)

I don't know what "RS" refers to. You have to allow some indication of the fact that many experts feel the USPSTF process, and its opinions specifically in oncology, are flawed. I again call out the existing text in the breast cancer section.Drcoop (talk) 18:28, 5 April 2013 (UTC)

"RS" refers to one of our core policies, "use reliable sources" -- [ UseTheCommandLine ~/talk ] # _ 18:36, 5 April 2013 (UTC)
The breast cancer language and references are from secondary, reliable sources. I would have no quarrel with adding primary sources so long as there were existing secondary sources to establish notability, and feel that makes the article better overall, but referencing primary sources directly should be done judiciously, if at all. -- [ UseTheCommandLine ~/talk ] # _ 18:39, 5 April 2013 (UTC)
The ideal source would be a review article or book (with a reputable publisher) that talked about the USPSTF in detail, perhaps covering the organization's entire history, rather than a 'political' source in response to a particular and recent decision. The problem with single-issue responses is that they tend to be intemperate. For example, a lot of people were angry about the USPSTF's recommendation on breast cancer and frightened that they would be unable to get the screening that they wanted, but it's calmed down since then, the sky didn't fall, and most women now seem to be following their personalized medicine approach rather than the one-size-fits-some model previously recommended.
A general source would be more likely to avoid the pitfalls of a source that is complaining about a particular new decision. I wonder if anything like that has been published. Have either of you looked for something like that? WhatamIdoing (talk) 05:47, 7 April 2013 (UTC)
I wasn't able to find anything independent or anything that could be considered RS. Most of what i saw was responses about this or that guideline, with sometimes additional criticism of the whole endeavor, almost always by physicians or other advocacy groups, with the occasional blog. It's still a lot of search results, and i didnt go through more than a few hundred or so, but that's what i got so far. -- [ UseTheCommandLine ~/talk ] # _ 06:02, 7 April 2013 (UTC)

Reccomendations Summary[edit]

The article covers the controversial decisions, but there are many other important recommendations that didn't have the public fuss.

  • CT for Lung Cancer
  • Colorectal cancer using fecal occult blood testing, sigmoidoscopy, or colonoscopy in adults, beginning at age 50

Perhaps the article should list only the Grade A Recommendations.

http://www.uspreventiveservicestaskforce.org/Page/Name/recommendations

Timetraveler3.14 (talk) 01:20, 21 October 2015 (UTC)