Talk:Walser German

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My confidence in the Ethnologue: Languages of the World has been severly damaged because of what they've written on Walser German. How could they write such a nonsense! J. 'mach' wust 18:33, 21 Jan 2005 (UTC)

Does Walser have anything to do with Vlach, Walloon or Welsh (ie Strangers) Brendandh 23:33, 13 December 2006 (UTC)
no, this is from valais "valley". dab (𒁳) 16:45, 2 September 2007 (UTC)

yeah, I'm from austria, and wal was used by germans to describe celtic people, for example: Wal-nuss is a german word and means wal-nut, (celtic nut). Wales means celts in old german. So there's a connection. Wallis, Walser, Walgau....so on - they all show the celtic roots. Its very common for central europe, that most of the names are celtic, but a direct link to wales doesn't exist, the only one is that the germans invaded GB as well as central europe and probably.

Source: Arnulf Krause - die welt der kelten (sry german - means the celtic world) 62.178.96.155 (talk) 00:46, 1 April 2009 (UTC)

No, dab is right, Wallis comes from Vallis Poenina. Not every word starting in Wal- is connected to Proto-Germanic *Walhaz, Early Modern German Walchen or Walen. The name of Wales does come from *Walhaz, though. The link of Central German Walchen names with Wales is via (Romanised) Celts and no more or less direct than that of Vlachs or Walloons. Ultimately, it's all from the same Germanic word. --Florian Blaschke (talk) 23:30, 20 July 2014 (UTC)