Tayibe (Lebanon)

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For other places with similar names, see Taybeh (disambiguation).
Tayibe
(طيبة (مرجعيون
Village
Posters on Tayibe village walls after the 2006 Lebanon War
Posters on Tayibe village walls after the 2006 Lebanon War
Map showing the location of Tayibe within Lebanon
Map showing the location of Tayibe within Lebanon
Tayibe
Location within Lebanon
Coordinates: 33°16′35″N 35°31′14″E / 33.27639°N 35.52056°E / 33.27639; 35.52056Coordinates: 33°16′35″N 35°31′14″E / 33.27639°N 35.52056°E / 33.27639; 35.52056
Grid position 198/297 PAL
Country  Lebanon
Governorate Nabatieh Governorate
District Marjeyoun District
Time zone EET (UTC+2)
 • Summer (DST) EEST (UTC+3)
Dialing code +961
Tayibe
Et Taibeh
Alternate name Et Tayibe
Location 2 kilometres (1.2 mi) south of the Litani River
History
Periods Heavy Neolithic
Cultures Qaraoun culture
Site notes
Archaeologists Louis Dubertret and Jacques Cauvin
Public access Unknown

Tayibe, Et Tayibe or Et Taibeh is a village in the Marjeyoun District in south Lebanon.

Name[edit]

According to E. H. Palmer, the name Tayibe means "The good, sweet, or wholesome" (about water).[1]

Archaeological site[edit]

By the village is a Heavy Neolithic archaeological site of the Qaraoun culture.[2][3]

The site was discovered by Louis Dubertret and materials studied by Jacques Cauvin. Heavy Neolithic materials recovered resembled those from Qaraoun.[3]

History[edit]

In 1875, Victor Guérin found here a village with 800 Metualis.[4] He further noted: "Its principal mosque, now in ruins, is built of superb blocks, apparently ancient. It contains in the interior several monolithic columns."[5]

In 1881, the Palestine Exploration Fund's Survey of Western Palestine (SWP) noted here: "There are several sarcophagi and cisterns in the village ; some caves near."[6] They further described it as: "A large well-built village, built of stone, containing about 600 Metawileh and 400 Moslems. The Caimacam has a good house here. There are some figs and olives round the village and arable land; water is supplied from a spring and two birkets."[7]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Palmer, 1881, p. 33
  2. ^ Moore, A.M.T. (1978). The Neolithic of the Levant. Oxford University, Unpublished Ph.D. Thesis. pp. 444–446. 
  3. ^ a b L. Copeland; P. Wescombe (1966). Inventory of Stone-Age Sites in Lebanon: North, South and East-Central Lebanon, p. 53. Impr. Catholique. Retrieved 29 August 2011. 
  4. ^ Guérin, 1880, pp. 268-269
  5. ^ Guérin, 1880, pp. 268-269; as given in Conder and Kitchener, 1881, SWP I, p. 139
  6. ^ Conder and Kitchener, 1881, SWP I, p. 139
  7. ^ Conder and Kitchener, 1881, SWP I, p. 90

Bibliography[edit]

External links[edit]