The Family (The Family album)

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The Family
The Family LP.jpg
Studio album by
ReleasedAugust 19, 1985
Recorded1984–1985
GenrePop, R&B, funk, jazz
Length36:00
LabelPaisley Park/Warner Bros.
25322
ProducerDavid Z, Prince, Eric Leeds
Professional ratings
Review scores
SourceRating
Allmusic3/5 stars[1]

The Family is a 1985 album released on Prince's Paisley Park Records label by the band of the same name. The album consists of eight Minneapolis sound tracks but with a funk-jazz slant; two of the tracks are instrumentals, and three are ballads. A single was released for "The Screams of Passion", a modest hit that was re-released in 1996 on the Girl 6 soundtrack. A promo version of "High Fashion" was distributed. "Nothing Compares 2 U", an emotional ballad, became more widely known five years later when a cover by Sinéad O'Connor was released as a single to worldwide success.

The album was released on vinyl; following the success of O'Connor's version of "Nothing Compares 2 U" a CD version of the album was released in Japan and Germany/Europe.

Alternate recordings of several of the songs from the project featuring Prince on vocals were recorded, but most remain in the vault at Paisley Park Studios. Prince's original 1984 studio recording of "Nothing Compares 2 U" was not officially released until 2018, when it was issued as a single by Warner Bros. Records in conjunction with his estate.[2]

Chart history[edit]

Peak position 14—Billboard R&B Chart (spent 29 weeks on the chart).

Track listing[edit]

All tracks written by Prince, except where noted.

Side one
No.TitleLength
1."High Fashion"5:06
2."Mutiny"3:57
3."The Screams of Passion"5:26
4."Yes" (Prince and Eric Leeds)4:27
Side two
No.TitleLength
5."River Run Dry" (Bobby Z.)3:31
6."Nothing Compares 2 U"4:31
7."Susannah's Pajamas" (Prince and Eric Leeds)3:58
8."Desire"4:58

References[edit]

  1. ^ Allmusic review
  2. ^ "Listen to Prince's Original Version of "Nothing Compares 2 U" | Pitchfork". pitchfork.com. Retrieved April 19, 2018.