The Globe (London newspaper)

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Placard for The Globe announcing the signing of the Treaty of Versailles, 28 June 1919

The Globe was a British newspaper that ran from 1803 to 1921. It was founded by Christopher Blackett,[1][2] the coal mining entrepreneur from Wylam, Northumberland, who had commissioned the first commercially useful adhesion steam locomotives in the world.[3] It merged with the Pall Mall Gazette in 1921. Under the ownership of Robert Torrens during the 1820s it supported radical politics, and was regarded as closely associated with Jeremy Bentham. By the 1840s it was more mainstream and received briefings from within the Whig administration. In 1871 it was owned by a Tory group headed by George Cubitt, who brought in George Armstrong as editor.[4] It was controlled shortly before World War I by Max Aitken.[5]

Turnovers[edit]

In journalism, turnovers are articles which run beyond the page that they begin on, forcing the reader to turnover.[note 1] In the case of the Globe, the term has a special meaning. Turnovers for the Globe were essays and sketches, either social, descriptive or humorous,[7][8] which began at the top of the rightmost column on the first page and carried on to the second page.[9] The typical length of such a turnover article in The Globe was 1,200 words.[10] The turnovers were a noted feature of The Globe.[11][12]

The first turnover article appeared in January 1877, and was titled Irish Life by Richard Barry O'Brien (1847–1918).[12] The Bucks Herald considered that the articles were often good reading.[6] The turnovers were removed from the front page at one stage, but were returned after a change of ownership in 1914. Some readers abandoned the paper after the turnover were moved from their traditional place on the front page.[13]

Hind stated that many authors began their careers writing turnovers for The Globe, but moved on when their writing could command a higher priced than the guinea (21 shillings) that was the standard fee at The Globe. At the time, The Daily News was paying four guineas for articles of interest.[9] Foster stated in 1914 that "every journalist and literary man in London has at some time or other in his early days written Globe turnovers"[13]

Authors of Globe turnover articles included:

  • William Davenport Adams (1851–1904) who was on the editorial staff of The Globe.[14]
  • George Latimer Apperson (1857–1937), who produced a collection of essays called An Idler's Calender (George Allen, London, 1901)[15] which was drawn mostly from his Globe turnover articles.[16]
  • Charles Lewis Hind (1862–1927) , who wrote that he did a great deal of writing for The Globe despite the low fee offered because he loved to see his name in print and send cuttings to his mother.[9]
  • Neil Munro (1863–1930) was a frequent contributor.[17]
  • Frank Bonnett, (born 1873)[18] who wrote on sporting topics and firearms was the author of many turnover articles.[19]

Staff[edit]

Staff of the newspaper included William Davenport Adams, Arthur Morrison, William Le Queux,[20] and P. G. Wodehouse, who took over from William Beach Thomas as assistant to Harold Begbie on the "By the Way" column and eventually succeeded Begbie in 1904.[21] Wodehouse's career at the newspaper coincided with those of Charles H. Bovill and Herbert Westbrook.[21] Under Aitken (Beaverbrook) the "By the Way" column was moved to the Daily Express, where it was signed 'Beachcomber'.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Timothy Hackworth and the Locomotive by Robert Young page 53 says of Blackett "Better known in London as the proprietor of the Globe newspaper, established in 1803". Young was published in 1923 and 1975. It is likely that Young sources subsequent quoted references to this linkage.
  2. ^ Blackett's and Literature at http://www.theblacketts.com/articles/47-blacketts-and-literature retrieved 7 November 2013.
  3. ^ "Timothy Hackworth's Essential Place in Early Locomotive Development", an article by Norman Hill in Railway Archive Number 16, Lightmoor Press, Witney, 2007 page 6.
  4. ^ Matthew, H. C. G. "Armstrong, Sir George Carlyon Hughes, first baronet (1836–1907)". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/30449. (Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
  5. ^ Boyce, D. George. "Aitken, William Maxwell". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/30358. (Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
  6. ^ a b "Notes: Local and General". Bucks Herald (Saturday 13 April 1889): 6. 13 April 1889. Retrieved 10 November 2020 – via The British Newspaper Archive.
  7. ^ The Globe (1883). ""Turnovers"" from The Globe: Essays and sketches, social, descriptive and humorous, by the best writers of the day. London: The Offices of ""The Globe"". Retrieved 8 November 2020 – via Google Books.
  8. ^ The Globe (1885). More ""Turnovers"" from The Globe: Being a second volume of essays and sketches, social, descriptive and humorous, by the best writers of the day. London: The Offices of ""The Globe"". Retrieved 8 November 2020 – via Google Books.
  9. ^ a b c Hind, C. Lewis (6 December 1924). "Living by Writing in the '80s and '90s". The Sphere (Saturday 06 December 1924): 26. Retrieved 10 November 2020 – via The British Newspaper Archive.
  10. ^ "Men and Matters". The Globe (London newspaper) (Saturday 05 January 1895): 7. 5 January 1895. Retrieved 10 November 2020 – via The British Newspaper Archive.
  11. ^ Simonis, H. (1917). The street of ink, an intimate history of journalism. London: Cassell and Company, Ltd. p. 98. Retrieved 8 November 2020 – via The Internet Archive.
  12. ^ a b "The Globe Centenary". The Globe (London newspaper) (Thursday 01 January 1903): 5. 1 January 1903. Retrieved 10 November 2020 – via The British Newspaper Archive.
  13. ^ a b Foster, A. E. Manning (19 June 1914). "The Bookmnarker". Daily Citizen (British newspaper) (Friday 19 June 1914): 14. Retrieved 10 November 2020 – via The British Newspaper Archive.
  14. ^ "Obituary". The Times (Thursday 28 July 1904): 8. 28 July 1904. Retrieved 7 November 2020.
  15. ^ Apperson, George Latimer (1901). An idler's calendar : open air sketches and studies. London: George Allen. Retrieved 10 November 2020 – via The Hathi Trust (access may be limited outside the United States).
  16. ^ "The General Reader". The Field (Saturday 07 December 1901): 41. 7 December 1901. Retrieved 10 November 2020 – via The British Newspaper Archive.
  17. ^ "Literary Gossip". The Globe (London newspaper) (Saturday 02 October 1897): 6. 2 October 1897. Retrieved 10 November 2020 – via The British Newspaper Archive.
  18. ^ Forshaw, Charles .F (ed.). "Frank Bonnett". Gems of Poesy by Present Day Authors. p. 78. Retrieved 10 November 2020 – via Google Books.
  19. ^ "Gossip about Books". The Globe (London newspaper) (Thursday 19 August 1915): 3. 19 August 1915. Retrieved 10 November 2020 – via The British Newspaper Archive.
  20. ^ Official Publisher Site of William Le Queux Retrieved 15 October 2013.
  21. ^ a b Jasen, David A. (2002) P.G. Wodehouse: A Portrait of a Master, pp. 42–50. Music Sales Group. Google Books. Retrieved 15 October 2013.

Bibliography[edit]

  • Deering, Dorothy. The London "Globe" of the 1840s and 1850s, Victorian Periodicals Newsletter, No. 11, [Vol. 4, No. 1] (Feb., 1971), pp. 28–29. Published by: The Johns Hopkins University Press on behalf of the Research Society for Victorian Periodicals. Stable URL: https://www.jstor.org/stable/20084876.

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ The Bucks Herald noted in 1889 that you had to use your paper knife to read the second page as the page edges were joined, and not trimmed.[6]

External links[edit]

Media related to The Globe at Wikimedia Commons