Thomas Frischknecht

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Thomas Frischknecht
Thomas Frischknecht 1996.jpg
Frischknecht in 1996
Personal information
Full nameThomas Frischknecht
NicknameFrischi
Born (1970-02-17) 17 February 1970 (age 48)
Feldbach, Switzerland
Height1.76 m (5 ft 9 in)
Weight69 kg (152 lb)
Team information
Current teamSwisspower
DisciplineMTB
RoleRider
Professional team(s)
1990-2000Ritchey
2001-Swisspower
Major wins
World MTB Marathon Champion (2003, 2005)
World MTB Cross Country Champion (1996)

Thomas Frischknecht (born 17 February 1970 in Feldbach, Switzerland) is a former Swiss mountain bike and cyclo-cross racer, often called Europe's Elder Statesman of mountain biking,[1] because of his extraordinarily long career at the top level of the sport. A professional since 1990, he was on top of the Mountain Bike World Championship podium for the first time in 1996 and most recently in 2004.[2]

Biography[edit]

Frischi (as he is called) advocates staying 'fit for life' and dope free racing. He is considered an excellent example of a clean sportsman.[1][3]

In 1996 he was second at the World Cross-country Mountain Bike Championships, but after France's Jerome Chiotti confessed having used EPO when he won the title that year, he got the rainbow jersey from Chiotti, handed over as a friendly act in an unofficial ceremony.[4]

He won the Olympic silver medal in 1996. The next day he competed in the men's road race on a Ritchey cyclocross bike after fellow Swiss team member Tony Rominger fell ill. He finished the race in the middle of the pack.[5]

Frischknecht also competes in cyclo-cross, where he won an Amateur World Champion title, was Vice World Champion in 1997 and is a multiple-time Swiss Champion.[6]

Thomas is married and has three children. Thomas's father was a cyclo-cross racer as well, winning three silver medals at World Championships. He won a Swiss stage race called Grandprixtell in the early 1990s[citation needed], and took part in the Olympic Road Race in 1996.[citation needed]

Thomas first traveled to America in 1990 to compete in the then new genre of mountain biking. He became closely linked to Tom Ritchey, a major bike-components producer, who provided support and became a mentor and a good friend. Ritchey has sponsored him ever since. Other major sponsors include Swisspower, an electric utility consortium, and Scott bicycles.

Frischknecht was multiple Swiss cyclist of the year[citation needed] and author of a book on mountain biking, Richtig Mountainbiken. He is currently involved with the Frischi Bike School in the Engadin/St. Moritz area of Switzerland.

Victories[edit]

1988
World Championship, Cyclo-cross, Juniors, Hagendorf
1989
Roma, Cyclo-cross (ITA)
1990
Schulteiss-Cup, Cyclo-cross (GER)
1991
National Championship, Cyclo-cross, Elite, Switzerland (SUI)
Overijse, Cyclo-cross (BEL)
Schulteiss-Cup, Cyclo-cross (GER)
Wetzikon, Cyclo-cross (SUI)
World Championship, Cyclo-cross, Amateurs, Gieten
1992
Dagmersellen, Cyclo-cross (SUI)
Mont Sainte-Anne, Mountainbike (CAN)
Roma, Cyclo-cross (ITA)
Schulteiss-Cup, Cyclo-cross (GER)
Landgraaf, Mountainbike (NED)
Strathpeffer, Mountainbike (GBR)
Mount Snow, Mountainbike (USA)
1993
European Championship, Mountainbike, Elite
Schulteiss-Cup, Cyclo-cross (GER)
Wetzikon, Cyclo-cross (SUI)
1994
Dagmersellen, Cyclo-cross (SUI)
Mont Sainte-Anne, Mountainbike (CAN)
1995
Vail, Mountainbike (USA)
Mammoth Lakes, Mountainbike (USA)
1996
World Championship, Mountainbike XC Elite, Cairns
Sankt-Wendel, Mountainbike (GER)
Gansingen, Cyclo-cross (SUI)
1997
National Championship, Cyclo-cross, Elite, Switzerland, Liestal (SUI)
Sankt-Wendel, Mountainbike (GER)
1998
Budapest, Mountainbike (HUN)
Hombrechtikon, Cyclo-cross (SUI)
1999
Meilen, Cyclo-cross (SUI)
Zeddam, Cyclo-cross (NED)
Magstadt, Cyclo-cross (GER)
National Championship, Cyclo-cross, Elite, Switzerland, Eschenbach (SUI)
Canmore, Mountainbike (AUS)
Liestal, Cyclo-cross (SUI)
Obergögsen, Cyclo-cross (SUI)
2001
Safenwil, Cyclo-cross (SUI)
Magstadt, Cyclo-cross (GER)
Kaprun, Mountainbike (AUT)
Castelnuovo, Cyclo-cross (ITA)
Dagmersellen, Cyclo-cross (SUI)
2002
Dagmersellen, Cyclo-cross (SUI)
National Championship, Cyclo-cross, Elite, Switzerland (SUI)
Hittnau, Cyclo-cross (SUI)
San Mateo, Cyclo-cross (USA)
Hombrechtikon, Cyclo-cross (SUI)
2003
World Championship, Mountainbike Marathon
Russikon, Cyclo-cross (SUI)
2004
San Mateo, Cyclo-cross (b) (USA)
San Mateo, Cyclo-cross (USA)
2005
World Championship, Mountainbike Marathon, Lillehammer (NOR)
Magstadt, Cyclo-cross (GER)
2017
Absa Cape Epic Mixed category (RSA)

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Thomas Frischknecht". Mountain Bike Hall of Fame. 1999. Archived from the original on 30 June 2006. Retrieved 7 March 2017.
  2. ^ "Men, Mountain Bike World Cup". UCI. Retrieved July 25, 2006.
  3. ^ "Doping statement". Frischknecht's home page. Archived from the original on March 18, 2005. Retrieved July 25, 2006.
  4. ^ "News for May 25, 2000: Chiotti hands it back". Cycling News. May 25, 2000. Retrieved July 25, 2006.
  5. ^ "Interview: Thomas Frischknecht". Bike Radar. August 12, 2008. Retrieved July 25, 2008.
  6. ^ "CycloX World Cup: Coupe du Monde - 1998-1999". Union Cycliste Internationale. January 3, 1999. Retrieved July 25, 2006.

External links[edit]

Olympic Games
Preceded by
Stefan Schärer
Flagbearer for   Switzerland
Sydney 2000
Succeeded by
Roger Federer