Tim Hugo

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Tim Hugo
Member of the Virginia House of Delegates
from the 40th district
Assumed office
January 4, 2003
Preceded by Jay O'Brien
Personal details
Born Timothy Douglas Hugo
( 1963 -01-07) January 7, 1963 (age 54)
Norfolk, Virginia
Political party Republican
Spouse(s) Paula
Children Christopher
Jackie
Katie
Matthew
Residence Clifton, Virginia
Alma mater College of William & Mary
Occupation Businessman
Politician
Website www.timhugo.com
Military service
Allegiance  United States
Service/branch United States Army
Years of service 1990–1998
Rank Sergeant
Unit U.S. Army Reserve

Timothy Douglas "Tim" Hugo (born January 7, 1963) is an American businessman and politician. Since 2003, Hugo serves in the Virginia House of Delegates, representing the 40th district, which encompasses Clifton. The district also includes sections of Catharpin, Centreville, Fairfax, Fairfax Station, Gainesville, Haymarket, and Manassas.

A member of the Republican Party, Hugo is the House of Delegates' majority caucus chairman.[1] Hugo serves on the Commerce and Labor (2007–present), Education (2003), Finance (2004–present), Privileges and Elections (2003–2006 and 2010–present), Science and Technology (2007–2009), and Transportation (2003–present) committees.[2]

Education and professional career[edit]

In 1986, Hugo earned a Bachelor of Arts from the College of William & Mary.[1] In 1987, he received a Kodak Fellowship from the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University. Between 1990 and 1998, he served in the United States Army Reserve.

Hugo held several staff positions within the United States Congress. He was the legislative director for Representative Jennifer Dunn of Washington, and was the chief of staff to Representative Bud Shuster of Pennsylvania, chairman of the House Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure.

Hugo is the executive director of Free File Alliance, an association of tax preparation companies.

Notable Legislation[edit]

Business[edit]

  • HB2479 - Reduced property tax rates on commercial property within localities encompassed by the Northern Virginia Transportation Authority (NVTA).[3]
  • HB2162 - Requires a taxpayer with an enterprise data center operation to apportion Virginia taxable income using single factor apportionment based on sales if such taxpayer enters into a memorandum of understanding with the Virginia Economic Development Partnership Authority (“VEDP”) to make a new capital investment of at least $150 million in an enterprise data center in Virginia.[4]
  • HB846 - GO Virginia: Creates the Virginia Collaborative Economic Development Performance Grant Fund, which will award funding to two or more localities that share local revenue from joint economic initiatives.[5]
  • HB884 - Creates a major innovator research and development (R&D) expenses tax credit, as well as increasing the statutory cap of Virginia’s refundable R&D tax credit from $6 million to $7 million.[6]

Education[edit]

  • HB1905 – Exempts schools that teach martial arts (MA) from the same licensing procedures as child daycare programs, as they do not have the same responsibilities. MA programs do not have custodial responsibility for children, prepare food, provide nap times, or have any activities beyond MA training.[7]
  • HB11 - Requires that textbooks approved by the Virginia Board of Education shall note that the Sea of Japan is also referred to as the East Sea.[8]

Higher Education[edit]

  • HB1980 - Requires Virginia colleges and universities to post relevant financial and academic information on the front page of their websites, in order to aid prospective students and their parents in the application and decision process.[9]
  • HB863 [Did not pass General Assembly] – Would have required at least 75 percent of undergraduate students admitted into Virginia’s state-funded higher education institutions be domiciled in Virginia. Delegate Hugo has introduced similar legislation since 2004.[10]

Human Trafficking[edit]

  • HB1898 - Provides that abduction of any person for the purpose of prostitution or of a minor for the purpose of manufacturing child pornography is a Class 2 felony.[11]
  • HB1606 - Adds felony charges to those who solicit prostitution from a minor, on top of the misdemeanor for general solicitation.[12]
  • HB485 - Allows Commonwealth attorneys to subpoena electronic communications from abduction and prostitution offenders.[13]
  • HB1964 - Creates new felonies for trafficking of persons for commercial sexual activity.[14]

Energy[edit]

  • HB2708 - Requires service providers to enter into an agreement to purchase any excess electricity generated by an eligible customer-generator, a process called net metering. The measure also makes Old Dominion Power subject to the same net energy metering provisions that apply to other investor-owned electric utilities. Old Dominion Power had been exempt from all provisions of the Electric Utility Restructuring Act.[15]
  • HB980 – Extended, until July 1, 2011, the sunset provision allowing vehicles bearing clean special fuel license plates to use HOV lanes regardless of the number of passengers. Delegate Hugo sponsored similar legislation from 2006-2009, extending the provision by 1 year each time.[16]
  • HB1022 - Provides that an investor-owned electric utility will receive triple credit toward meeting the goals of the renewable energy portfolio standard program for energy derived from offshore wind.[17]
  • HB1239 - Exempts business-owned or business-operated solar energy equipment, facilities, or devices that collect, generate, transfer, or store thermal or electric energy from real and personal property tax.[18]
  • HB2267 - Created the Virginia Solar Energy Development Authority.[19]

Transportation[edit]

  • HB2480 - Directs localities on how to spend tax money earned by the NVTA and the Hampton Roads Transportation Authority.[20]
  • HB1068 - Extends sunset provision, from June 30, 2013 to June 30, 2018, the reduced tax rate for special real property tax on commercial and industrial property in the localities encompassed by the NVTA.[21]

Public Safety[edit]

  • HB993 – Provides that causing serious bodily injury to another while racing a motor vehicle in a manner that shows a reckless disregard for human life is a Class 6 felony.[22]
  • HB1252 - Requires a mandatory minimum 25-year sentence for sex crimes against children.[23]
  • HB865 & HJ123 – Would provide property tax exemptions for surviving spouses of fallen emergency responders. This is an Amendment to the Constitution of Virginia, which will be voted upon by the citizens of the Commonwealth during the General Election on November 8, 2016.[24]
  • HB875 – Commonly referred to as the Kelsey Smith Act, this legislation requires wireless providers to respond immediately to law enforcement requests to ping mobile devices for real-time location data for suspected victims of abduction who are believed to be in immediate danger.[25]

Health[edit]

  • HB1017 – Would have required the Board of Health to include Lyme disease on the list of diseases required to be reported, and allows a licensed physician to prescribe, administer or dispense long-term antibiotic therapy to a patient diagnosed with Lyme disease. This bill was incorporated into HB512 (Rust), but did not pass.[26]
  • HB1075 - Requires hospitals to educate patients, and in certain circumstances their families, about follow-up care, treatment, and services upon discharge. The bill also requires community services boards to provide information to hospitals about alcohol and substance abuse services available to minors.[27]

Mental Health[edit]

  • HB1609 - Requires Virginia’s CSBs to establish a reliable system for assuring that a designated contact person at each Virginia institution is notified whenever one of its students is the subject of commitment proceedings and for assuring exchange of information among institutions, providers and the legal system in a timely fashion.[28]
  • HB1268 - Establishes policies and procedures, for violence prevention committees of each public institution of higher education, for reporting threatening or aberrant behavior that may represent a physical threat to the community.[29]

Elections and State[edit]

  • HB2707 – Prohibits localities from purchases of direct recording electronic (DRE) devices for voting purposes. Also prohibited any form of wireless communication to or from voting or counting devices while polls are open on election day, and established requirements for localities to provide accessible equipment for disabled voters.[30]
  • HB1018 - Defines the term “telecommuting” in the Code of Virginia, as a work arrangement in which supervisors direct or permit employees to perform their usual job duties away from their central workplace, at least one day per week and in accordance with work agreements.[31]
  • HB1021 - Established a goal for state agencies, except for the Department of State Police, to have 20 percent of their eligible workforce telecommuting by January 1, 2010. A report from the Secretary of Administration showed that this goal was surpassed with 24% of eligible employees telecommuting, as of October, 2010.[32]

Holidays[edit]

  • HJ632 - Designates January 13 as "Korean-American Day."[33]
  • HJ142 - Designates Asian Lunar New Year Day (when it occurs on the Asian lunar calendar).[34]
  • HJ144 - Designates September 21 as "Small Business Day."[35]
  • HJ145 - Designates May "Preeclampsia Month."[36]
  • HJ608 - Designates August 14 "Pakistan Independence Day" in Virginia.[37]

Electoral history[edit]

Date Election Candidate Party Votes  %
Virginia House of Delegates, 40th district
Dec 17, 2002[38] Special Timothy D. "Tim" Hugo Republican 2,927 67.40
Carol A. Hawn Democratic 1,318 30.34
Joseph P. Oddo Independent 59 1.36
Mark A. Calhoun Independent 39 0.90
Jay O'Brien was elected to the Senate; seat stayed Republican
Nov 4, 2003[39] General Timothy D. "Tim" Hugo Republican 9,400 98.24
Write Ins 168 1.76
Nov 8, 2005[40] General Timothy D. "Tim" Hugo Republican 13,076 89.85
Write Ins 1,477 10.15
Nov 6, 2007[41] General Timothy D. "Tim" Hugo Republican 8,707 57.14
Rex A. Simmons Democratic 6,520 42.78
Write Ins 11 0.07
Nov 3, 2009[42] General Timothy D. "Tim" Hugo Republican 12,056 63.40
Susan S. Conrad Democratic 6,936 36.47
Write Ins 23 0.12
Nov 8, 2011[43] General Timothy D. "Tim" Hugo Republican 11,565 73.84
Dianne L. Blais Independent Greens 4,021 25.67
Write Ins 75 0.47
Nov 5, 2013[44] General Timothy D. "Tim" Hugo Republican 14,887 59.96
Jerry L. Foltz Democratic 9,903 39.88
Write Ins 40 0.16
Nov 3, 2015[45] General Timothy D. "Tim" Hugo Republican 10,875 65.17
Jerry L. Foltz Democratic 5,781 34.65
Write Ins 28 0.17

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Bio for Timothy D. Hugo". Virginia House of Delegates. Retrieved 2013-05-31. 
  2. ^ "Legislative Information System". Virginia General Assembly. Archived from the original on 1996-12-19. Retrieved 2013-05-31. 
  3. ^ "LIS > Bill Tracking > HB2479 > 2009 session". lis.virginia.gov. Retrieved 2016-05-26. 
  4. ^ "LIS > Bill Tracking > HB2162 > 2015 session". lis.virginia.gov. Retrieved 2016-05-26. 
  5. ^ "LIS > Bill Tracking > HB846 > 2016 session". lis.virginia.gov. Retrieved 2016-05-26. 
  6. ^ "LIS > Bill Tracking > HB884 > 2016 session". lis.virginia.gov. Retrieved 2016-05-26. 
  7. ^ "LIS > Bill Tracking > HB1905 > 2011 session". lis.virginia.gov. Retrieved 2016-05-26. 
  8. ^ "LIS > Bill Tracking > HB11 > 2014 session". lis.virginia.gov. Retrieved 2016-05-26. 
  9. ^ "LIS > Bill Tracking > HB1980 > 2015 session". lis.virginia.gov. Retrieved 2016-05-26. 
  10. ^ "LIS > Bill Tracking > HB863 > 2016 session". lis.virginia.gov. Retrieved 2016-05-26. 
  11. ^ "LIS > Bill Tracking > HB1898 > 2011 session". lis.virginia.gov. Retrieved 2016-05-26. 
  12. ^ "LIS > Bill Tracking > HB1606 > 2013 session". lis.virginia.gov. Retrieved 2016-05-26. 
  13. ^ "LIS > Bill Tracking > HB485 > 2014 session". lis.virginia.gov. Retrieved 2016-05-26. 
  14. ^ "LIS > Bill Tracking > HB1964 > 2015 session". lis.virginia.gov. Retrieved 2016-05-26. 
  15. ^ "LIS > Bill Tracking > HB2708 > 2007 session". lis.virginia.gov. Retrieved 2016-05-26. 
  16. ^ "LIS > Bill Tracking > HB980 > 2010 session". lis.virginia.gov. Retrieved 2016-05-26. 
  17. ^ "LIS > Bill Tracking > HB1022 > 2010 session". lis.virginia.gov. Retrieved 2016-05-26. 
  18. ^ "LIS > Bill Tracking > HB1239 > 2014 session". lis.virginia.gov. Retrieved 2016-05-26. 
  19. ^ "LIS > Bill Tracking > HB2267 > 2015 session". lis.virginia.gov. Retrieved 2016-05-26. 
  20. ^ "LIS > Bill Tracking > HB2480 > 2009 session". lis.virginia.gov. Retrieved 2016-05-26. 
  21. ^ "LIS > Bill Tracking > HB1068 > 2012 session". lis.virginia.gov. Retrieved 2016-05-26. 
  22. ^ "LIS > Bill Tracking > HB993 > 2004 session". lis.virginia.gov. Retrieved 2016-05-26. 
  23. ^ "LIS > Bill Tracking > HB1252 > 2006 session". lis.virginia.gov. Retrieved 2016-05-26. 
  24. ^ "LIS > Bill Tracking > HB865 > 2016 session". lis.virginia.gov. Retrieved 2016-05-26. 
  25. ^ "LIS > Bill Tracking > HB875 > 2016 session". lis.virginia.gov. Retrieved 2016-05-26. 
  26. ^ "LIS > Bill Tracking > HB1017 > 2010 session". lis.virginia.gov. Retrieved 2016-05-26. 
  27. ^ "LIS > Bill Tracking > HB1075 > 2012 session". lis.virginia.gov. Retrieved 2016-05-26. 
  28. ^ "LIS > Bill Tracking > HB1609 > 2013 session". lis.virginia.gov. Retrieved 2016-05-26. 
  29. ^ "LIS > Bill Tracking > HB1268 > 2014 session". lis.virginia.gov. Retrieved 2016-05-26. 
  30. ^ "LIS > Bill Tracking > HB2707 > 2007 session". lis.virginia.gov. Retrieved 2016-05-26. 
  31. ^ "LIS > Bill Tracking > HB1018 > 2008 session". lis.virginia.gov. Retrieved 2016-05-26. 
  32. ^ "LIS > Bill Tracking > HB1021 > 2008 session". lis.virginia.gov. Retrieved 2016-05-26. 
  33. ^ "LIS > Bill Tracking > HJ632 > 2007 session". lis.virginia.gov. Retrieved 2016-05-26. 
  34. ^ "LIS > Bill Tracking > HJ142 > 2012 session". lis.virginia.gov. Retrieved 2016-05-26. 
  35. ^ "LIS > Bill Tracking > HJ144 > 2012 session". lis.virginia.gov. Retrieved 2016-05-26. 
  36. ^ "LIS > Bill Tracking > HJ145 > 2012 session". lis.virginia.gov. Retrieved 2016-05-26. 
  37. ^ "LIS > Bill Tracking > HJ608 > 2013 session". lis.virginia.gov. Retrieved 2016-05-26. 
  38. ^ "Special Election- Dec 17, 2002". Virginia State Board of Elections. Retrieved 2013-05-31. 
  39. ^ "General Election- November 4, 2003". Virginia State Board of Elections. Retrieved 2013-05-31. 
  40. ^ "General Election- November 8, 2005". Virginia State Board of Elections. Retrieved 2013-05-31. 
  41. ^ "November 6, 2007 General Election Official Results". Virginia State Board of Elections. Archived from the original on March 4, 2016. Retrieved 2013-05-31. 
  42. ^ "November 2009 General Election Official Results". Virginia State Board of Elections. Archived from the original on 2016-03-04. Retrieved 2013-05-31. 
  43. ^ "November 2011 General Election Official Results". Virginia State Board of Elections. Retrieved 2013-05-31. 
  44. ^ "November 2013 General Election Unofficial Results". Virginia State Board of Elections. Archived from the original on 2013-06-15. Retrieved 2013-11-30. 
  45. ^ "November 2015 General Election Official Results". Virginia State Board of Elections. Retrieved 2015-11-04. 

External links[edit]