Tim Hugo

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Tim Hugo
Member of the Virginia House of Delegates
from the 40th district
In office
January 4, 2003 – January 8, 2020
Preceded byJay O'Brien
Succeeded byDan Helmer
Personal details
Born
Timothy Douglas Hugo

(1963-01-07) January 7, 1963 (age 58)
Norfolk, Virginia, U.S.
Political partyRepublican
Spouse(s)Paula
ChildrenChristopher, Jacqueline, Katherine, and Matthew
ResidenceClifton, Virginia
Alma materCollege of William & Mary (BA)
OccupationBusinessman,[1] politician, soldier
Websitewww.timhugo.com
Military service
Allegiance United States
Branch/serviceUnited States Army
Years of service1990–1998
RankSergeant
UnitArmy Reserve

Timothy Douglas Hugo (born January 7, 1963) is an American businessman, military veteran, and Republican politician in the Commonwealth of Virginia. He served as a member of the Virginia House of Delegates from 2003 to 2020, representing the 40th district. Hugo was defeated in the 2019 election by Democrat Dan Helmer.

Overview[edit]

From 2003 to 2020, Hugo served in the Virginia House of Delegates, representing the 40th district in Fairfax and Prince William counties. The district encompassed both the incorporated and unincorporated areas of Clifton in Fairfax County. It also included unincorporated parts of Centreville, Fairfax, and Fairfax Station in Fairfax County as well as unincorporated sections of Catharpin, Gainesville, Haymarket, and Manassas in Prince William County. Approximately 80% of the district's population and 65% of its landmass is located in Fairfax County.

A member of the Republican Party, Hugo was the House of Delegates' majority caucus chairman.[2] Hugo served on the Commerce and Labor (2007–2020), Education (2003), Finance (2004–2020), Privileges and Elections (2003–2006 and 2010–2020), Science and Technology (2007–2020), and Transportation (2003–2020) committees.[3]

While the 40th district is historically Republican-leaning, Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton bested Republican nominee Donald Trump by an eight-point margin (51–43%) in the 2016 presidential election. In the 2017 elections, Democrat Donte Tanner challenged Hugo, but narrowly lost. Despite having about 14% of the state's population residing within its boundaries, following the 2017 elections, Hugo remained the only Republican in the Virginia General Assembly to represent a district based in Fairfax County. Hugo lost reelection in 2019 to Democrat Dan Helmer.[4] At the time of his defeat, he was the last Republican to represented a significant portion of Fairfax County above the county level.[5]

Education and professional career[edit]

In 1986, Hugo earned a Bachelor of Arts (BA) from the College of William & Mary.[2] In 1987, he received a Kodak Fellowship (FS) from the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University. Between 1990 and 1998, he served in the United States Army Reserve.

Hugo held several staff positions within the United States House of Representatives. He was the legislative director for representative Jennifer Dunn of Washington, and was the chief of staff to representative Bud Shuster of Pennsylvania, chairman of the United States House Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure.

Hugo is the executive director of Free File Alliance, an association of tax preparation companies.

Electoral history[edit]

Hugo was first elected in a December 2002 special election. He replaced Republican incumbent Jay O'Brien, who vacated the seat after he won a November 2002 special election to represent the 39th district in the Senate of Virginia.[6] Hugo was re-elected in 2003, 2005, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2013, and 2015, never receiving less than 57% of the vote.[7] Following Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton's winning of the 40th district by an eight-point margin (51–43%) in 2016, Democrats targeted Hugo in 2017.[7] On November 7, 2017, Hugo had apparently lost by 68 votes to Democratic nominee Donte Tanner, but the following morning, election officials found an error in the reported results, and the results flipped to a 32-vote lead for Hugo.[8] After further canvassing, Hugo's lead increased to 115 votes.[9] As of November 8, the race was too close to call.[8] On November 27, the state board of elections certified the results, giving Hugo a 106-vote victory,[10] but on November 29, the Tanner campaign filed for a recount.[11] A recount was conducted, and on December 14, the recount confirmed that Hugo won the election by 99 votes.[12] Hugo lost in the 2019 election to Dan Helmer.

Date Election Candidate Party Votes %
Virginia House of Delegates, 40th district
Dec 17, 2002[13] Special Timothy D. "Tim" Hugo Republican 2,927 67.40
Carol A. Hawn Democratic 1,318 30.34
Joseph P. Oddo Independent 59 1.36
Mark A. Calhoun Independent 39 0.90
Jay O'Brien was elected to the Senate; seat stayed Republican
Nov 4, 2003[14] General Timothy D. "Tim" Hugo Republican 9,400 98.24
Write Ins 168 1.76
Nov 8, 2005[15] General Timothy D. "Tim" Hugo Republican 13,076 89.85
Write Ins 1,477 10.15
Nov 6, 2007[16] General Timothy D. "Tim" Hugo Republican 8,707 57.14
Rex A. Simmons Democratic 6,520 42.78
Write Ins 11 0.07
Nov 3, 2009[17] General Timothy D. "Tim" Hugo Republican 12,056 63.40
Susan S. Conrad Democratic 6,936 36.47
Write Ins 23 0.12
Nov 8, 2011[18] General Timothy D. "Tim" Hugo Republican 11,565 73.84
Dianne L. Blais Independent Greens 4,021 25.67
Write Ins 75 0.47
Nov 5, 2013[19] General Timothy D. "Tim" Hugo Republican 14,887 59.96
Jerry L. Foltz Democratic 9,903 39.88
Write Ins 40 0.16
Nov 3, 2015[20] General Timothy D. "Tim" Hugo Republican 10,875 65.17
Jerry L. Foltz Democratic 5,781 34.65
Write Ins 28 0.17
Nov 7, 2017[21] General Timothy D. "Tim" Hugo Republican 15,110 50.10
Donte T. Tanner Democratic 15,004 49.74
Write Ins 48 0.16
Nov 5, 2019[22] General Timothy D. "Tim" Hugo Republican 14,457 47.55
Dan Helmer Democratic 15,913 52.34
Write Ins 34 0.11

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Honorable Tim Hugo The Livingston Group, L.L.C." The Livingston Group. Retrieved 2019-11-05. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  2. ^ a b "Bio for Timothy D. Hugo". Virginia House of Delegates. Retrieved 2013-05-31. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  3. ^ "Legislative Information System". Virginia General Assembly. Archived from the original on 1996-12-19. Retrieved 2013-05-31. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  4. ^ "Virginia Election Results: November 5, 2019". The Virginia Public Access Project. Retrieved 2019-11-13.
  5. ^ "Dave Wasserman on Twitter". Twitter. Retrieved 2020-03-29.
  6. ^ Four Seek 40th District Seat in Va. House of Delegates (Washington Post)
  7. ^ a b Democrats optimistic after last vote in House 40th District (InsideNova)
  8. ^ a b Vote canvass changes lead in critical Northern Virginia House race (Roanoke Times)
  9. ^ House Democrat Leader Toscano says legal teams are in several districts for canvassing (WINA)
  10. ^ Virginia elections board certifies two state House races despite irregularities (Washington Post)
  11. ^ Democrats file for recounts in 2 tight Va. House races (WTOP)
  12. ^ First Va. House recount confirms Del. Tim Hugo’s re-election (WTOP)
  13. ^ "Special Election- Dec 17, 2002". Virginia State Board of Elections. Archived from the original on 2013-07-24. Retrieved 2013-05-31. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  14. ^ "General Election- November 4, 2003". Virginia State Board of Elections. Archived from the original on February 22, 2014. Retrieved 2013-05-31. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  15. ^ "General Election- November 8, 2005". Virginia State Board of Elections. Archived from the original on December 28, 2012. Retrieved 2013-05-31. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  16. ^ "November 6, 2007 General Election Official Results". Virginia State Board of Elections. Archived from the original on March 4, 2016. Retrieved 2013-05-31. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  17. ^ "November 2009 General Election Official Results". Virginia State Board of Elections. Archived from the original on 2016-03-04. Retrieved 2013-05-31. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  18. ^ "November 2011 General Election Official Results". Virginia State Board of Elections. Archived from the original on 2013-06-16. Retrieved 2013-05-31. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  19. ^ "November 2013 General Election Unofficial Results". Virginia State Board of Elections. Archived from the original on 2013-06-15. Retrieved 2013-11-30. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  20. ^ "November 2015 General Election Official Results". Virginia State Board of Elections. Retrieved 2015-11-04. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  21. ^ "November 2017 General Election Official Results". Virginia State Board of Elections. Retrieved 2017-11-27. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  22. ^ "November 2019 General Election Official Results". Virginia State Board of Elections. Retrieved 2019-12-20. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)

External links[edit]