Triangle Park (Dayton)

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Triangle Park
Triangle Park
LocationDayton, Ohio
Coordinates39°47′06″N 84°11′59″W / 39.785030°N 84.199596°W / 39.785030; -84.199596
OwnerDayton, Ohio
OperatorDayton Triangles
Capacity5,000 (American football)
SurfaceGrass
Tenants
Dayton Triangles

Triangle Park is a former American football stadium located in Dayton, Ohio. The stadium was home to the Dayton Triangles of the National Football League from 1920 to 1929. It had a capacity of 5,000 spectators. It was located at the confluence of the Great Miami River and Stillwater River. On October 3, 1920, it hosted the first NFL game against the Columbus Panhandles.[1]

Currently, Triangle Park is a park in the city of Dayton, known formally as Triangle Park Pavilion, located on 1700 Embury Park Rd., near Island Metro Park in North Dayton. Its features include both a baseball/softball diamond and a soccer field and it can be booked for special events.[2]

In 2019, in honor of the NFL's centennial season, the league announced that it would fund the construction of a new turf field at Triangle Park, and make donations to local youth football programs. Additionally, the Cincinnati Bengals planned to host a practice on the newly constructed field in late July or early August 2019.[1] In response to the announcement by the NFL to build the new turf field, a Native American filed to halt and cease the project, to protect a supposed American Indian burial site located at Triangle Park.[3]

Ohio's state historic preservation office stated that the burial sites are a "considerable distance" from the proposed site of the field. Despite this, the city of Dayton announced that they would postpone breaking ground on the new field until officials could be certain that the construction would not disturb anything of historical value.[4] On May 15, 2019, the city of Dayton officially scrapped the field, after a survey discovered a "unique and sizable anomaly" in the area that was "potentially prehistoric". The NFL donated the field to Welcome Stadium instead.[5]

Notes and references[edit]

  1. ^ a b Frolik, Cornelius (March 26, 2019). "NFL to build new field at Dayton park where first game was played". WHIO-TV. Retrieved March 26, 2019.
  2. ^ "Dayton - Triangle Park Pavilion". March 26, 2019. Retrieved March 26, 2019.
  3. ^ "Native American objects to new football field at Triangle Park". www.whio.com. Retrieved 2019-04-25.
  4. ^ "Dayton postpones turf field construction out of respect for Native American community". WDTN. April 26, 2019. Retrieved April 26, 2019.
  5. ^ "City of Dayton calls off plans for turf field at Triangle Park". WHIO.com. Cox Media Group. May 15, 2019. Retrieved May 15, 2019.