Triglochin maritima

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Sea arrowgrass
Stranddreizack.jpg
Scientific classification e
Kingdom: Plantae
Clade: Angiosperms
Clade: Monocots
Order: Alismatales
Family: Juncaginaceae
Genus: Triglochin
Species: T. maritima
Binomial name
Triglochin maritima

Triglochin maritima is a species of flowering plant in the arrowgrass family Juncaginaceae. It is found in brackish marshes, freshwater marshes, wet sandy beaches, fens, damp grassland and bogs. It has a circumboreal distribution, occurring throughout the northern Northern Hemisphere. In the British Isles it is common on the coast, but very rare inland.

Description[edit]

It is similar to marsh arrowgrass (Triglochin palustris) but has the following differences: it has stolons, is stouter. The leaves are fleshy and not furrowed above. It is not very aromatic. The raceme are more dense and like sea plantain. The flowers are fleshier[1]. The fruits are oval, 4 mm long, 2 mm wide.[2]

It varies in height from 8-30 inches (to 45 cm). It flowers in May to August; flowers are greenish, 3 petalled, edged with purple, 1/8 inch (2mm) across, in a long spike.[3][4] Common names include seaside arrowgrass,[5] common arrowgrass, sea arrowgrass and shore arrowgrass.

It can be an annual or perennial.[6]

Triglochin concinna is a synonym of this species.[7]

This plant is toxic, as it can produce cyanide. This species has been known to cause losses in cattle, with green leaves being more toxic than dried material[1].

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b C. Dwight Marsh, A. B. Clawson, and G. C. Roe Jr (1929). Arrow grass as a Stock-Poisoning Plant. United States Department of Agriculture.
  2. ^ Rose, Francis (2006). The Wild Flower Key. Frederick Warne & Co. p. 488. ISBN 978-0-7232-5175-0. 
  3. ^ Common Arrow-grass (Triglochin maritima)
  4. ^ Sterry, Paul (2006). Complete British Wild Flowers. HarperCollins Publishers Ltd. p. 188. ISBN 978-0-00-781484-8. 
  5. ^ "Triglochin maritima". Natural Resources Conservation Service PLANTS Database. USDA. Retrieved 15 December 2015. 
  6. ^ Phillips, Roger (1994). Wild Flowers of Britain. Macmillan Reference Books. p. 52. ISBN 0-330-25183-X. 
  7. ^ "Triglochin maritima in Flora of North America". www.efloras.org. Retrieved 2018-09-22.