Troy Grant

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The Honourable
Troy Grant
MP
Deputy Premier of New South Wales Troy Grant.jpg
Troy Grant in 2014
Minister for Police
Assumed office
2 April 2015
Premier Mike Baird
Gladys Berejiklian
Preceded by Stuart Ayres (as Minister for Police and Emergency Services)
Minister for Emergency Services
Assumed office
30 January 2017
Premier Gladys Berejiklian
Preceded by David Elliott
Member of the New South Wales Parliament
for Dubbo
Assumed office
26 March 2011
Preceded by Dawn Fardell
17th Deputy Premier of New South Wales
In office
16 October 2014 – 15 November 2016
Premier Mike Baird
Preceded by Andrew Stoner
Succeeded by John Barilaro
Minister for Justice
In office
2 April 2015 – 30 January 2017
Premier Mike Baird
Preceded by Brad Hazzard
Succeeded by portfolio abolished
Minister for the Arts
In office
23 April 2014 – 30 January 2017
Premier Mike Baird
Preceded by George Souris
Succeeded by Don Harwin
Minister for Racing
In office
2 April 2015 – 30 January 2017
Premier Mike Baird
Gladys Berejiklian
Preceded by himself (as Minister for Hospitality, Gaming and Racing)
Succeeded by Paul Toole
Personal details
Born (1970-02-11) 11 February 1970 (age 47)
Maitland, New South Wales
Nationality Australian
Political party The Nationals
Spouse(s) To Toni Grant
Occupation Former police officer
Website www.troygrant.com.au

Troy Wayne Grant (born 11 February 1970), an Australian politician, is the Minister for Police and the Minister for Emergency Services since January 2017 in the Berejiklian government.[1] Grant has been a member of the New South Wales Legislative Assembly representing Dubbo for the Nationals since 2011.

He is a former Deputy Premier of New South Wales and New South Wales Leader of The Nationals from October 2014 to November 2016. Grant was the Minister for Justice and Police, the Minister for Racing and the Minister for the Arts in the second Baird government, between April 2015 and January 2017.[2] In April 2014, Grant was appointed as the Minister for Hospitality, Gaming and Racing and the Minister for the Arts in the first Baird government.[3] Grant gained additional portfolio responsibilities in October 2014 and in addition to the above responsibilities in the two Baird ministries, he also served as the Minister for Trade and Investment, Minister for Regional Infrastructure and Services, and the Minister for Tourism and Major Events until 2 April 2015.[4][5] Grant stood down as Nationals leader and Deputy Premier on 15 November 2016.[6]

Early years and background[edit]

A police officer for 22 years, Grant has twice has been decorated with Commendations for Courage by the Commissioner of the New South Wales Police Force. He has implemented a number of community-based policing initiatives in Gilgandra and Brewarrina and he has received other awards, including the Premier’s Public Sector Award.[7] Grant led the paedophilia investigation into Catholic priest Vincent Ryan, and has said "there is nothing I would not do in order to protect the children of NSW" from sexual abuse.[5]

Grant can speak the Wiradjuri language, the native language of a large part of inland NSW.[8]

Political career[edit]

Grant was endorsed by the National Party as its candidate in Dubbo in June 2010, after a pre-selection battle with one other candidate, also a police officer.[9][10] At the March 2011 elections, Grant was elected and received a swing of 14.5% in the traditionally strong Nationals seat, winning 63.7% of the vote on a two-party preferred basis. Grant actually won 60 per cent of the primary vote, enough to take the seat without the need for preferences.[11] Grant defeated the incumbent independent politician Dawn Fardell, ending a 12-year hold by independent candidates.[12] In accordance with electoral procedures, he resigned his commission as a police officer.

Due to the resignation of Barry O'Farrell as Premier,[13] and the subsequent ministerial reshuffle by Mike Baird, the new Liberal Leader,[3] in April 2014 Grant was appointed as Minister for Hospitality, Gaming and Racing, Minister for the Arts, and appointed as a member of Cabinet.[4][14][15]

On 15 October 2014, state Nationals leader and Deputy Premier Andrew Stoner stood down for family reasons. The next day, on 16 October, Grant was elected party leader and the following day he was sworn in as Deputy Premier of New South Wales, assuming the majority of Stoner's former ministerial responsibilities.[5][16] On 14 November 2016, Grant, facing a leadership spill, announced his resignation as Nationals leader and Deputy Premier, effective the following day. His resignation followed a period of leadership speculation which came to a head after the Nationals' poor performance at the Orange state by-election on 12 November.[6][17]

Following the resignation of Mike Baird as Premier,[18] Gladys Berejiklian was elected as Liberal leader and sworn in as Premier.[19][20][21] The Berejiklian ministry was subsequently formed with Grant sworn in as the Minister for Police and the Minister for Emergency Services with effect from 30 January 2017.[1]

On 21 March 2017, the ABC reported with a headline Mr Grant NSW Police Minister fined for using phone in car, says he didn't know it was illegal[22] The Daily Telegraph reported that Police Minister Troy Grant was a"..decorated former police officer.." and also that "Mr Grant, who has always tried to ram home road safety messages — including the dangers of using mobiles behind the wheel .."[23]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Refreshed NSW cabinet sworn in". Sky News. Australia. AAP. 30 January 2017. Retrieved 30 January 2017. 
  2. ^ Hasham, Nicole (3 April 2015). "Premier Mike Baird's new NSW cabinet sworn in: Gladys Berejiklian and Gabrielle Upton first female Treasurer and Attorney-General". The Sydney Morning Herald. Retrieved 6 April 2015. 
  3. ^ a b Nicholls, Sean (22 April 2014). "Mike Baird's cabinet reshuffle a preparation for next election". The Sydney Morning Herald. Retrieved 24 April 2014. 
  4. ^ a b "The Hon. Troy Wayne GRANT, MP". Current Members of Parliament. Parliament of New South Wales. 3 December 2014. Retrieved 9 January 2015. 
  5. ^ a b c Hasham, Nicole (16 October 2014). "New NSW Nationals leader and Deputy Premier Troy Grant is not easily categorised". The Sydney Morning Herald. Retrieved 9 January 2015. 
  6. ^ a b Nicholls, Sean (14 November 2016). "Troy Grant to stand down as NSW Nationals leader". smh.com.au. Retrieved 14 November 2016. 
  7. ^ "Troy Grant – Candidate for Dubbo". The Nationals team. National Party of Australia. 2010. Retrieved 3 April 2011. 
  8. ^ http://www.smh.com.au/nsw/nsw-state-election-2015/nationals-leader-troy-grant-launches-nsw-campaign-in-local-aboriginal-dialect-20150315-144jbl.html
  9. ^ "Grant the voice for change in Dubbo". Media Release – Andrew Stoner MP. National Party of Australia. 7 June 2010. Retrieved 3 April 2011. 
  10. ^ Billings, Patrick (7 June 2010). "Nationals choose their cop". Daily Liberal. Fairfax Media. Retrieved 3 April 2011. 
  11. ^ Green, Antony (26 March 2011). "Dubbo". NSW Votes 2011. Australian Broadcasting Corporation. Retrieved 3 April 2011. 
  12. ^ Huntsdale, Justin (31 March 2011). "Nationals win Dubbo in state wide Coalition landslide". ABC News. Australian Broadcasting Corporation. Retrieved 3 April 2011. 
  13. ^ "Barry O'Farrell quits as NSW Premier over memory fail". The Australian. 16 April 2014. Retrieved 23 April 2014. 
  14. ^ "Mike Baird's NSW cabinet". The Sydney Morning Herald. 22 April 2014. Retrieved 23 April 2014. 
  15. ^ "Troy Grant joins NSW cabinet". Daily Liberal. 22 April 2014. Retrieved 24 April 2014. 
  16. ^ Gerathy, Sarah (16 October 2014). "Troy Grant replaces Andrew Stoner as NSW Deputy Premier". ABC News. Retrieved 16 October 2014. 
  17. ^ Gerathy, Sarah (14 November 2016). "Who will lead the NSW Nationals after Troy Grant, and what does the vote mean for Mike Baird?". www.abc.net.au. Retrieved 14 November 2016. 
  18. ^ Jacques, Owen (19 January 2017). "Baird resigns: NSW Premier to quit top job and Parliament". The Satellite. Retrieved 18 January 2017. 
  19. ^ "Swearing-In of The Honourable Gladys Berejiklian MP, the 45th Premier of New South Wales, and The Honourable John Barilaro MP, Deputy Premier". Vice Regal Program. Governor of New South Wales. 23 January 2017. Retrieved 27 January 2017. 
  20. ^ "Ministers". www.parliament.nsw.gov.au. Parliament of New South Wales. Retrieved 27 January 2017. 
  21. ^ Clennell, Andrew (26 January 2017). "Premier Gladys Berejiklian plans major reshuffle for cabinet". The Daily Telegraph. Retrieved 27 January 2017. 
  22. ^ "'I didn't know it was illegal': NSW Police Minister fined for using phone in car". ABC News. 21 March 2017. 
  23. ^ "Minister’s baa-d mistake". The Daily Telegraph. Retrieved 21 March 2017. 

External links[edit]

Parliament of New South Wales
Preceded by
Dawn Fardell
Member for Dubbo
2011–present
Incumbent
Political offices
Preceded by
Stuart Ayres
as Minister for Police and Emergency Services
Minister for Police
2015 – present
Incumbent
Preceded by
David Elliott
Minister for Emergency Services
2017 – present
Preceded by
George Souris
Minister for the Arts
2014 – 2017
Succeeded by
Don Harwin
Preceded by
Andrew Stoner
Deputy Premier of New South Wales
2014–2016
Succeeded by
John Barilaro
Minister for Regional Infrastructure and Services
2014 – 2015
Succeeded by
John Barilaro
as Minister for Regional Development
Minister for Trade and Investment
2014 – 2015
Succeeded by
Stuart Ayres
as Minister for Trade, Tourism, and Major Events
Minister for Tourism and Major Events
2014 – 2015
Preceded by
George Souris
Minister for Hospitality, Gaming and Racing
2014 – 2015
Succeeded by
himself
as Minister for Racing
Preceded by
himself
as Minister for Hospitality, Gaming and Racing
Minister for Racing
2015 – 2017
Succeeded by
Paul Toole
Preceded by
Brad Hazzard
as Minister for Justice
Minister for Justice
2015 – 2017
Succeeded by
portfolio abolished
Party political offices
Preceded by
Andrew Stoner
Leader of the National Party of Australia – NSW
2014–2016
Succeeded by
John Barilaro