User talk:Subverted

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
  (Redirected from User talk:Arachnowhat)
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Sparassid - wagga wagga[edit]

hey,

as i just read you're interested in sparassidae, do you have any idea what species the one from wagga wagga here (or possibly the others) could be? :) --Sarefo (talk) 10:50, 1 October 2008 (UTC)

To be totally honest I currently know next to nothing about sparassid taxonomy. More of a passive interest as of now, I even have one that is native to my area I have yet to ID past the most likely genus... Sorry. :) --Arachnowhat (talk) 02:28, 2 October 2008 (UTC)

I'm the guy that took the picture of the trapdoor spider[edit]

Hi, You wrote this:

That image does not show any part of either pair of book lungs.(And also, let me urge you not to dispose any more trapdoor spiders from their homes. As someone that has worked with them, around them, and for their conservation seeing someone dig up such a sensitive species is quite disheartening.[not to mention that the spider, unless you collected it, probably died due to the way they do not dig new burrows...that is if the ruptured abdomen you caused did not kill anyway.]) In the future, please utilize the numerous images already available online instead of digging something up. Arachnowhat (talk) 03:38, 5 January 2009 (UTC)

First let me thank you for your response.

I didn't collect that spider. I came along when somebody was and I took this picture. It was his intention to keep it I believe.

I read on the internet that trapdoor spiders might be becoming endangered because of habitat loss. How do people know that? There's still a lot of undeveloped habitat in Southern California. Is somebody out doing surveys and they can't find as many as they expect?

I thought the two clearly visible (after expanding it) depressions on the abdomen were associated with the book lungs. They seemed to be in about the right place based on the information from this image: http://giantspiders.com/anatomy.html

If they aren't associated with the book lungs do you know what they are?

I also had read that only the young can dig the holes. I wasn't quite sure I had quite understood that, but it sounds like I did based on what you said. Will the adult even make an attempt to dig a new burrow after it's been pulled out?

Anyway thanks again for your response and I appreciate your concerns about the trapdoor spiders.

Regards, Dave davefoc@gmail.com —Preceding unsigned comment added by Davefoc (talkcontribs) 06:30, 8 January 2009 (UTC)

Sorry for my ~ over the top response, but I have seen whole populations dug up and collected in pristine localities. From experience I have found it is far better to respond in such a manner than to say "dont do that..."

Is somebody out doing surveys and they can't find as many as they expect?

I have been personally doing a similar kind of thing, mostly finding, mapping, and documenting populations, habitats, and proximity to humans. To be completely honest, none of them have been in great shape. This is without mentioning the amazingly slow growth rate they have. In captivity(4 spiders collected from an area about to be developed, 2 were spiderlings) I had one spiderling survive to molt, this took just over a year...and it got smaller. Of the two adult females I collected only one ended up molting in captivity and this was a year and a half after I had collected it. With the slow growth rate and habitat destruction they are experiencing, these spiders certainly arent doing well in the wild.(And if all goes well they will soon have protected status or even endangered status.)

I thought the two clearly visible (after expanding it) depressions on the abdomen were associated with the book lungs.

Those are not the book lungs but rather just depressions on the sternum, the book lungs are visible in this image of one of the females I had.

Will the adult even make an attempt to dig a new burrow after it's been pulled out?

In my experience all they will do is dig down, make a cell in the ground and die. But, like I said, the ruptured abdomen it seemed to have suffered, it wouldnt have mattered. Anyways, you say that you found someone who was collecting it, do you happen to have their contact info/name? There has been quite an upsurgence in collecting of California native mygalomorphs lately and it would be nice to know if that person is somehow connected to it...—Arachnowhat (talk) 09:12, 8 January 2009 (UTC)

Bump-proof locks[edit]

In reply to your message: you're correct, however, in the context of pin tumbler locks, there are none that are bump-proof. It's a problem with the design. 70.91.178.185 (talk) 17:48, 3 June 2009 (UTC)

Interesting. A friend of mine who works in a lock shop has not heard of these. Thanks for pointing it out. 70.91.178.185 (talk) 13:30, 5 June 2009 (UTC)

Talkback[edit]

Nuvola apps edu languages.svg
Hello, Subverted. You have new messages at Ged UK's talk page.
You can remove this notice at any time by removing the {{Talkback}} or {{Tb}} template.

GedUK  14:57, 7 June 2009 (UTC)

Mark Lloyd[edit]

Marcus0609 created the page and later blanked it. We take this as an indication that the author does not want it around and remove it. You are welcome to have the best version at User:Subverted/Mark Lloyd. I have restored it there for you. You can see why, it was not retained when you look at the page, it may not be the person you think it is. Graeme Bartlett (talk) 04:01, 15 August 2009 (UTC)

Proposed deletion of Robert Daley (filmmaker)[edit]

Ambox warning yellow.svg

The article Robert Daley (filmmaker) has been proposed for deletion because under Wikipedia policy, all biographies of living persons created after March 18, 2010, must have at least one source that directly supports material in the article.

If you created the article, please don't take offense. Instead, consider improving the article. For help on inserting references, see Wikipedia:Referencing for beginners or ask at Wikipedia:Help desk. Once you have provided at least one reliable source, you may remove the {{prod blp}} tag. Please do not remove the tag unless the article is sourced. If you cannot provide such a source within ten days, the article may be deleted, but you can request that it be undeleted when you are ready to add one. Nat Gertler (talk) 03:49, 11 January 2011 (UTC)

I added a link to a news article about a film and to (I know...) IMDb. Is that enough? -Subverted (talkcontribs) 04:35, 11 January 2011 (UTC)
It's enough to stop the BLP prod, yes. The article could use more sources to show notability, so don't be surprised if someone flags it at some point for that. Thanks for taking the action to fix it up! --Nat Gertler (talk) 06:29, 11 January 2011 (UTC)

L. deserta[edit]

Thanks for your note. If you've got references, the anti-alarmist figures you've presented would make a great addition. I've been browsing around, adding to the article every tidbit of information I can scrape up from a scholarly source, and haven't found any yet that express this less-elevated danger, only that there are confirmed cases of infections.

Interestingly, however, I was browsing the Arachnoboards and found LOTS of closeup shots of folks handling these spiders with bare hands-- something I've never seen done with L. reclusa. Bob the WikipediaN (talkcontribs) 04:06, 4 March 2011 (UTC)

I will look through my various collected papers to see if I have a paper with something specific about that figure, it was something I discussed in person with Rick Vetter, so I dont have a citation on hand. When you find information about Loxosceles species...always take it with a grain of salt unless that person is a respected/published arachnologist. Far more misinformation out there than fact...as for handling, I have handled L. reclusa(also L. laeta, L. blanda, Sicarius sp., Latrodectus, etc...) in the course of keeping them, the spiders are generally very calm handlers as opposed to most true spiders. Not me in the photo, but another person also from AB: [1] -Subverted (talkcontribs) 04:42, 4 March 2011 (UTC)
Interesting indeed. I keep brown recluses myself and have never dared touch one! I use a pair of cosmetic tweezers (and have grown very skilled at picking up the spiders with them). And as for third party literature on recluses-- I'm well aware of the myth surrounding the spiders and am only using scholarly journals as references.
Thanks for doing some research on this; I trust you know your stuff here, especially if you're handling them barehanded. I assume certain precautions should be taken when handling recluses? Bob the WikipediaN (talkcontribs) 05:56, 4 March 2011 (UTC)

I finally found a bit of info for you to parse into article form, if you really would like to.

There are four categories of Loxosceles bites:

- Unremarkable (very little damage, self-healing)
- Mild reaction (redness, itching, slight lesion but typically self-healing)
- Dermonecrotic (necrotic skin lesion considered by many the typical reaction)
- Systemic or viscerocutaneous (affect vascular system, very rare, potentially fatal)
One point that should be kept in mind is that most Loxosceles bites do not result in serious skin lesions, are typically self-healing without medical intervention and do not result in scarring; regular supportive care is typically sufficient with excellent outcome (Wright et al. 1997; Anderson 1998; Cacy & Mold 1999). Of patients developing necrotic lesions, about two-thirds heal without complications (Pauli et al. 2006). The more extreme manifestations of venom injury generate concern and publication of medical reports and, hence, skew the perception of the severity of the average loxoscelism event. Nonetheless, in the most severe manifestations, loxoscelism lesions can grow to 40 cm in size, healing

can take several months and leave a disfiguring scar. Cutaneous loxoscelism damage is greater in obese victims (e.g., Masters 1998) because the venom enzymes readily destroy poorly vascularized adipose tissue. There can be gravitational spread of the lesion. Rare systemic manifestations can be serious and potentially life threatening (especially in children). Typically, Loxosceles spiders bite for defensive purposes and the resulting injury is a single focal lesion. Bites frequently occur when the spider is compressed against exposed flesh, typically while a person is sleeping or getting dressed.
- page 6/14 Spiders of the genus Loxosceles (Araneae, Sicariidae): a review of biological, medical and psychological aspects regarding envenomations

No specifics, but still some good information. As for special precautions, I try to be careful but it is generally unnecessary beyond making sure that you do not get one of the spiders on you unless you know where they are, I actually have a reference for this from another paper: "Gertsch mentions hand-collecting hundreds of recluses without receiving bites" I am much more nervous handling grass, wolf, and jumping spiders(all of which have bitten me) than these spiders, not that I do not give them the respect the so definitely deserve... (As for knowing my stuff, I like to think I do, but I have no qualifications beyond my bothering academics with my questions and having found a few interesting things.) - Subverted (talkcontribs) 06:42, 4 March 2011 (UTC)

I hadn't imagined jumping spiders would bite (the ones I'm used to are rather tiny). While I'm busy at the moment (the editing you saw me doing today was merely to keep my sanity during a stressful programming assignment), I'll bookmark your talk page and hopefully get around to adding the information within the next couple weeks (perhaps it'll be a good break from researching how insulin resistance causes blood coagulation and inflammation, of all the exciting topics in the world that I could have been assigned... Face-confused.svg ) Thanks for coming up with those facts in such a quick period of time! Face-grin.svg Bob the WikipediaN (talkcontribs) 09:12, 4 March 2011 (UTC)
You should look into what species of Phidippus are found in your area when summer rolls around, I was bitten by a nearly 1" P. audax in Texas, but everything is bigger there (at least invertebrate wise, lol). Not a problem at all on the facts...I have a slightly outdated collection of papers I keep in my bookmarks for personal reference so I didnt have to look far. I wish I had your level dedication to wiki projects, it is very impressive. - Subverted (talkcontribs) 09:25, 4 March 2011 (UTC)
Thanks! Heh, knowledge, dedication, seems like a fair trade-off to me, lol. Now that I think about it, I do remember one particularly large urban jumper I found once here in Evansville, Indiana|southern Indiana]], but it got away before I could find something to take it home in to identify and preserve it. Bob the WikipediaN (talkcontribs) 09:34, 4 March 2011 (UTC)
I've added the information to recluse spider-- I suggest you run through it with a fine-toothed comb and make sure I haven't purported anything! Thanks! Bob the WikipediaN (talkcontribs) 15:50, 14 March 2011 (UTC)

Comment in sig[edit]

yea, I'm on bugguide, done a few stuff there, but prefer to do what I can on Wikipedia :D. Bugboy52.4 ¦ =-= 02:25, 20 March 2011 (UTC)

Lol[edit]

Thanks for the extended laugh, this made my day: [2] Bob the WikipediaN (talkcontribs) 23:42, 2 June 2011 (UTC)

Always happy to allow my fail to be humorous to others. :) - Subverted (talkcontribs) 01:54, 3 June 2011 (UTC)

Type of tarantula in Afghanistan[edit]

Hello,

I am a US soldier currently deployed to Afghanistan in the Mehtar Lam province. Several of my soldiers have reported sitings of large brown spiders in their living quarters. Some of them have been saying it's a camel spider, others have claimed it's a tarantula. Being a medic, this raises some alarm. Soldiers are not incredibly bright, and like to keep often dangerous types of animals and insects as pets or mascots. In my aid station today, I spotted one of these big guys and was able to snap a photo. If you could email me so that I could send you the photo, I would greatly appreciate it. I am having some trouble finding a site to identify this one. The largest problem is that in every search I conduct, people are only seeming interested in camel spiders which aren't an arachnid at all, but a member of the crustecian family. I am unable to find any sites that have any info on common spiders in the middle east and asia.

It was rather large, the torso being about 2 1/2" to 3" inches in length, and about an inch wide. Or, about the size of an average adult male thumb. The legs spread out over 4" to 6", or the size of a palm. Definitely not camel spider. It was a tan/gray color with very fine hair. I tried to scoop him up for further investigation, but he ran around the side of the box and fell. It was on a high shelf. To my amazement however, he floated safely to the floor via the web he had attached to the box, and sped away. Not common with a tarantula. In fact, I've never heard of a tarantula dangling from a single line of web, although they are able to spin large webs.

You can reach me at kevin.nakata@ymail.com If you can't identify it, I'm hoping that perhaps you'll be able to point me in the right directin. Thanks in advance for all of your help.

CPL Nakata, Kevin FOB Kalagush, Afg. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 214.26.214.163 (talk) 06:23, 23 March 2012 (UTC)

ArbCom elections are now open![edit]

Hi,
You appear to be eligible to vote in the current Arbitration Committee election. The Arbitration Committee is the panel of editors responsible for conducting the Wikipedia arbitration process. It has the authority to enact binding solutions for disputes between editors, primarily related to serious behavioural issues that the community has been unable to resolve. This includes the ability to impose site bans, topic bans, editing restrictions, and other measures needed to maintain our editing environment. The arbitration policy describes the Committee's roles and responsibilities in greater detail. If you wish to participate, you are welcome to review the candidates' statements and submit your choices on the voting page. For the Election committee, MediaWiki message delivery (talk) 13:47, 24 November 2015 (UTC)

ArbCom Elections 2016: Voting now open![edit]

Scale of justice 2.svg Hello, Subverted. Voting in the 2016 Arbitration Committee elections is open from Monday, 00:00, 21 November through Sunday, 23:59, 4 December to all unblocked users who have registered an account before Wednesday, 00:00, 28 October 2016 and have made at least 150 mainspace edits before Sunday, 00:00, 1 November 2016.

The Arbitration Committee is the panel of editors responsible for conducting the Wikipedia arbitration process. It has the authority to impose binding solutions to disputes between editors, primarily for serious conduct disputes the community has been unable to resolve. This includes the authority to impose site bans, topic bans, editing restrictions, and other measures needed to maintain our editing environment. The arbitration policy describes the Committee's roles and responsibilities in greater detail.

If you wish to participate in the 2016 election, please review the candidates' statements and submit your choices on the voting page. MediaWiki message delivery (talk) 22:08, 21 November 2016 (UTC)

ArbCom 2017 election voter message[edit]

Scale of justice 2.svg Hello, Subverted. Voting in the 2017 Arbitration Committee elections is now open until 23.59 on Sunday, 10 December. All users who registered an account before Saturday, 28 October 2017, made at least 150 mainspace edits before Wednesday, 1 November 2017 and are not currently blocked are eligible to vote. Users with alternate accounts may only vote once.

The Arbitration Committee is the panel of editors responsible for conducting the Wikipedia arbitration process. It has the authority to impose binding solutions to disputes between editors, primarily for serious conduct disputes the community has been unable to resolve. This includes the authority to impose site bans, topic bans, editing restrictions, and other measures needed to maintain our editing environment. The arbitration policy describes the Committee's roles and responsibilities in greater detail.

If you wish to participate in the 2017 election, please review the candidates and submit your choices on the voting page. MediaWiki message delivery (talk) 18:42, 3 December 2017 (UTC)

Nomination of Joshua Claybourn for deletion[edit]

A discussion is taking place as to whether the article Joshua Claybourn is suitable for inclusion in Wikipedia according to Wikipedia's policies and guidelines or whether it should be deleted.

The article will be discussed at Wikipedia:Articles for deletion/Joshua Claybourn (2nd nomination) until a consensus is reached, and anyone is welcome to contribute to the discussion. The nomination will explain the policies and guidelines which are of concern. The discussion focuses on high-quality evidence and our policies and guidelines.

Users may edit the article during the discussion, including to improve the article to address concerns raised in the discussion. However, do not remove the article-for-deletion notice from the top of the article.

Notifying you about the discussion, since you have made significant contributions to articles related to this subject. --IndyNotes (talk) 04:09, 21 January 2018 (UTC)