Vivian Gornick

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Vivian Gornick
Vivian Gornick (2018)
Vivian Gornick (2018)
Born (1935-06-14) June 14, 1935 (age 83)
The Bronx, New York City
OccupationAuthor, memoirist, essayist
NationalityAmerican
SubjectCultural history, memoir
Notable worksIn Search of Ali Mahmoud: an American Woman in Egypt (1973), Fierce Attachments: a Memoir (1987), Emma Goldman: Revolution as a Way of Life (2011), The Odd Woman and the City (2015)

Vivian Gornick (born June 14, 1935 in Bronx, New York)[1][2] is an American critic, journalist, essayist, and memoirist.

Background[edit]

In 1957 Gornick received a bachelor of arts degree from City College of New York and in 1960 a master of arts degree from New York University.[3]

Career[edit]

She was a reporter for the Village Voice from 1969 to 1977.[2] Her work has also appeared in The New York Times, The Nation, The Atlantic Monthly, and many other publications. In 1969, the radical feminist group New York Radical Feminists was founded by Shulamith Firestone and Anne Koedt;[4](p186) Firestone's and Koedt's desire to start this new group was aided by Gornick's 1969 Village Voice article, "The Next Great Moment in History Is Theirs". The end of this essay announced the formation of the group and included a contact address and phone number, raising considerable national interest from prospective members.[4](p187)[5] Gornick has also published eleven books; the most recent, The Odd Woman and the City, was published in May, 2015.[6] She teaches writing at The New School. For the 2007–2008 academic year, she was a fellow at the Radcliffe Institute at Harvard University, and in 2015 she served as the Bedell Distinguished Visiting Professor in the University of Iowa's Nonfiction Writing Program.[7]

Partial bibliography[edit]

  • In Search of Ali Mahmoud: an American Woman in Egypt (1973, Saturday Review Press) (Nominated for the 1974 National Book Award)
  • The Romance of American Communism (1977, Basic Books)
  • Essays in Feminism (1978, Harper & Row)
  • Women in Science: Portraits from a World in Transition (1983, Simon & Schuster)[8]
  • Fierce Attachments: A Memoir (1987, Farrar, Straus and Giroux)
  • Approaching Eye Level (1996, Beacon Press)
  • The End of the Novel of Love (1997, Beacon Press; Nominated for the 1997 National Book Critics Circle Award for Criticism)
  • The Situation and the Story: The Art of Personal Narrative (2001, Farrar, Straus and Giroux)
  • The Solitude of Self: Thinking About Elizabeth Cady Stanton (2005, Farrar, Straus and Giroux)
  • The Men in My Life (2008, MIT Press; National Book Critics Circle Award finalist for criticism)
  • Women in Science: Then and Now (2009, The Feminist Press at CUNY)
  • The Ancient Dream (Sep/Oct 2010, Boston Review)
  • Emma Goldman: Revolution as a Way of Life. (2011, Yale University Press; Finalist for the 2011 National Jewish Book Award)
  • The Odd Woman and the City (May 2015, Farrar, Straus and Giroux)[6]

Selected essays[edit]

  • "What Independence Has Come to Mean to Me" in Cathi Hanauer's 2002 New York Times best-selling essay anthology The Bitch in the House: 26 Women Tell the Truth about Sex, Solitude, Work, Motherhood and Marriage

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Library of Congress authority file". loc.gov. Archived from the original on July 25, 2017. Retrieved June 2, 2013.
  2. ^ a b Tresa Grauer. "Vivian Gornick". Jewish Women's Archives Encyclopedia. Archived from the original on September 24, 2016. Retrieved July 24, 2017.
  3. ^ Elaine Blair (Winter 2014). "Vivian Gornick, The Art of Memoir No. 2". The Paris Review. Archived from the original on July 11, 2017. Retrieved July 24, 2017.
  4. ^ a b Echols, Alice (1990). Daring to Be Bad: Radical Feminism in America, 1967–75. University of Minnesota Press. pp. 186–187. ISBN 0-8166-1787-2. Retrieved July 15, 2017.
  5. ^ Vivian Gornick (1969). "The Next Great Moment in History Is Theirs". The Village Voice (November 27, 1969). (Reprinted in: V Gornick. (1978). Essays in Feminism. Harper and Row. ISBN 0-06-011627-7.)
  6. ^ a b "Vivian Gornick – biography". Department of English, The University of Iowa. Archived from the original on May 30, 2015. Retrieved April 13, 2016.
  7. ^ "Visiting Writers Series". Department of English, College of Liberal Arts & Sciences, The University of Iowa. July 24, 2017. Archived from the original on April 9, 2015. Retrieved April 13, 2016.
  8. ^ Gornick, Vivian (January 1, 1983). Women in Science: Portraits from a World in Transition. Simon & Schuster. ISBN 9780671417383.

External links[edit]