Vyacheslav Kebich

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Vyacheslav Kebich
Вячеслав Францевич Кебич.jpg
1st Prime Minister of Belarus
In office
19 September 1991 – 21 July 1994
Preceded byPosition established
Succeeded byMikhail Chyhir
Personal details
Born (1936-06-10) 10 June 1936 (age 83)
Koniuszewszczyzna, Nowogródek Voivodeship, Poland
ProfessionEngineer

Vyacheslav Frantsevich Kebich (Belarusian: Вячаслаў Францавіч Кебіч [vʲatʂaˈslaw kˈʲɛbʲitʂ], Russian: Вячесла́в Фра́нцевич Ке́бич; born 10 June 1936 in a village near Wołożyn, Poland)[1] is a political figure from Belarus.

Prime Minister of Belarus[edit]

He was the first Prime Minister of Belarus, serving from 1991 until 1994, having held the equivalent office of the Byelorussian SSR since 1990. During his tenure in office he promoted a pro-Russian stance. In early February 1994 that he 'would continue campaigning for a [monetary] union with [Russia], as I always have done and am doing now. It is not just a question of economic circumstances. We are linked by the closest spiritual bonds; we have a common history and similar cultures'. In early March he told parliament that Belarusian-Russian relations were Minsk's basic foreign policy priority, 'owing to the community of Belarusian-Russian culture, the identical interests of two fraternal peoples.

Other roles and background[edit]

Kebich was one of the drafters and signers of the Belavezha Accords that effectively ended the Soviet Union and founded the Commonwealth of Independent States.

He was also one of two candidates in the final running for President of Belarus in 1994, but losing to current leader Alexander Lukashenko by a wide margin. After that election, he has led the Belarusian Commerce and Financial Union and was member of the House of Representatives.

Before his career as a politician, Kebich worked as an engineer.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Bernard A. Cook (2001). Europe since 1945: An Encyclopedia - Vol. 2. New York: Garland. p. 718. Retrieved 1 September 2013.