Wendy Carlin

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Wendy Carlin
Born1957
Alma mater
Spouse(s)Andrew Glyn
Awards
Websitehttps://sites.google.com/site/wendycarlinucl/
Scientific career
Institutions
ThesisThe development of the factor distribution of income and profitability in West Germany, 1945-1973
Doctoral advisorAndrea Boltho

Wendy Joan Carlin, CBE (born 1957) is a Professor of Economics at University College London, expert advisor to the Office for Budget Responsibility, and research fellow at the Centre for Economic Policy Research.[1][2]

Early life and education[edit]

Carlin was born in 1957, her father Brian Frederick Carlin was an agricultural scientist.[3] Carlin completed her undergraduate education at Murdoch University, Australia in 1978.[4][5] She then went on to study for a master's degree and PhD at the University of Oxford on a Rhodes Scholarship, finishing in 1987. Her thesis was entitled The development of the factor distribution of income and profitability in West Germany, 1945-1973 and was supervised by Andrea Boltho.[6] In her early academic career, Carlin focused on contemporary economics and economic history, and in particular, West Germany.[7][8]

Career[edit]

During her PhD studies, Carlin was a lecturer in Economics at Christ Church, Oxford[9]. After her PhD she moved to the department of Economics at UCL where she has remained since[10]. She was appointed professor at UCL in 2002[10].

In 2000, Carlin became a research fellow at the Centre for Economic Policy Research[10]. Since 2011, Carlin has been a member of the expert advisory board to the Office for Budget Responsibility[10]. Between 2000 and 2015 she was co-managing editor (with Philippe Aghion) of Economics of Transition.[11]

In 2013, Carlin was one of the founders of Curriculum Open-access Resources in Economics (CORE), for which she is now the director. CORE is a new introductory course in economics provided free to students and teachers,[12][13] in which economists "will learn to use evidence from history, experiments and other data sources to test competing explanations and policies"[14] CORE is funded by grants from various organisations, including Open Society Foundations, Friends Provident Foundation and Nuffield Foundation[15] and is based in the Economics Department at University College London[16].

In 2015, she became a member of the council of the Royal Economic Society[10].

Carlin has written three books, all coauthored with David Soskice:[17]

  • Macroeconomics and the Wage Bargain: A Modern Approach to Employment, Inflation and the Exchange Rate (1990)
  • Macroeconomics: Imperfections, Institutions and Policies (2006)
  • Macroeconomics: Institutions, Instability and the Financial System (2015)

Awards and Honours[edit]

In September of 2014, Carlin was awarded an honorary degree in Economics from Murdoch University.[18]

In 2015, Carlin was awarded a CBE in the new year honours.[19]

Personal life[edit]

Carlin was married to University of Oxford economics lecturer Andrew Glyn, with whom she had two children. Glyn died in December 2007 from brain cancer.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Wendy Carlin". Institute for New Economic Thinking. Retrieved 2018-03-08.
  2. ^ "Professor Wendy Carlin | People". Oxford Martin School. Retrieved 2018-03-08.
  3. ^ a b Glyn, Andrew John (1943–2007), economist and socialist | Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/99345.
  4. ^ "CV - Wendy Carlin - UCL Economics". sites.google.com. Retrieved 2018-03-08.
  5. ^ "Alumni profile: The Professor of common sense". media.murdoch.edu.au. Retrieved 2018-03-08.
  6. ^ Wendy., Carlin, (1987). "The development of the factor distribution of income and profitability in West Germany, 1945-1973".
  7. ^ Carlin, Wendy (1996). Post-war European Growth: West German growth and institutions, 1945-1990. Cambridge University Press. pp. 455–497.
  8. ^ Carlin, Wendy (2015). European Social Models From Crisis to Crisis: Employment and Inequality in the Era of Monetary Integration: The Transformation of the German Model. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
  9. ^ "Alumni profile: The Professor of common sense". Murdoch University. Retrieved 1 May 2018.
  10. ^ a b c d e Carlin, Wendy. "Curriculum Vitae". University College London. Retrieved 1 May 2018.
  11. ^ "Professor Wendy Carlin - RMIT University". www.rmit.edu.au. Retrieved 2018-04-02.
  12. ^ "Interview with Professor Wendy Carlin – Drayton Tribune". www.draytontribune.com. Retrieved 2018-03-08.
  13. ^ "The Ronald Tress Memorial Lecture: Trump, Brexit and Economics". Retrieved 2018-03-08.
  14. ^ Carlin, Wendy (2013). "Economics explains our world – but economics degrees don't". Financial Times. Retrieved 2018-04-02.
  15. ^ "Who funds CORE?". The CORE Project. Retrieved 1 May 2018.
  16. ^ "Contact us". The CORE Project. Retrieved 1 May 2018.
  17. ^ "Professor Wendy Carlin". www.ucl.ac.uk. Retrieved 2018-03-08.
  18. ^ "Honorary degree for international economist". media.murdoch.edu.au. Retrieved 2018-03-08.
  19. ^ "Subscribe to read". Financial Times. Retrieved 2018-03-08.