Wikipedia:Peer review/List of number-one albums of 2000 (U.S.)/archive1

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List of number-one albums of 2000 (U.S.)[edit]

This peer review discussion has been closed.
I've listed this article for peer review to check the quality of the prose.

Thanks, Efe (talk) 08:39, 13 March 2009 (UTC)

Second nomination on 13 March: One nomination a day, please. Brianboulton (talk) 00:24, 15 March 2009 (UTC)

Been notified by Rurhfisch. Check on my talk page. Sorry. --Efe (talk) 08:23, 15 March 2009 (UTC)

Ruhrfisch comments: I will review this and the 2005 number-one albums list too. The lists in both cases seem OK, so my comments will be mostly on the lead. Here are some suggestions for improvement.

  • I've said this before about these kind of lists, but I really still do not understand the use of present tense. Instead of this Pop outfit The Beatles' compilation album 1 is one of the three longest-running albums of 2000, topping the Billboard 200 for eight weeks non-consecutively., I would say something like Pop outfit The Beatles' compilation album 1 was one of the three longest-running albums of 2000, topping the Billboard 200 for eight non-consecutive weeks. I am also not sure "Pop outfit" is needed here - do The Beatles really need a descriptive phrase like that?
  • Problem sentence: In 2000, 20 albums topped the chart in 53 issues of the magazine, but two of which albums started their peak position in 1999 and are therefore excluded. Suggest "two of those albums", and I would explicitly identify the two excluded albums. If one album is exluded, I assume it is the one on the first week(s) of the year, but here I am not sure which are meant. I have already noted my tense concerns.
  • "of which" is also awward or even ungrammatical here. I suggest something like The first two of which [these] albums [each] topped the Billboard 200 for eight straight weeks. 1 charted for eight non-consecutive weeks, of which [a] stretch [which] began in late 2000 and continued in early 2001.
  • I think it would read more clearly if "debut" and "first week" were swapped in The album was noted for its debut sales figure of 2.4 million, the highest first-week sales in the Billboard 200 history.
  • Similarly I would fix The figure marked as [This is] the only album to have sold more than two million copies in a one-week period, and the album [it] retains the distinction until today [as of March 2009].[3][4] as noted. Avoid words like "today" as things can change with time.
  • Needs to be clarified - is this "second best" record for that year? for all time? The album's debut sales, over 1.76 million, held the distinction as the second best sales in a week.[3]
  • I don't understand these three sentences. How did it break two records - why didn't Mariah Carey's album break the record established by Alanis Morisette? The album opened at number one on the Billboard 200 on the strength of over 1.3 million unit sales, breaking the record for first-week sales by a female act.[3] Debut sales of Oops!... I Did It Again broke the record set by singer Alanis Morissette's Supposed Former Infatuation Junkie, which opened with 469,054 sales. It also shattered singer Mariah Carey's record, whose album Daydream sold 759,959 copies during the week of Christmas 1995.[3] If I understand it right, I would combine the first two sentences to something like The album opened at number one on the Billboard 200 on the strength of over 1.3 million unit sales, breaking the record for first-week sales by a female act,[3] singer Alanis Morissette's Supposed Former Infatuation Junkie, which opened with 469,054 sales [in year].
  • "band" seems too bland a description in Band Backstreet Boys' Black & Blue sold 1.6 million units in its debut week... either use no description or find a better one (Boy band? Former boy band?)
  • Glad to see a non-Billboard ref - I was going to suggest a copyedit, but I think if you fix all the things I noted here, I think that you will not need one.
  • WHy not sell out the full name of "Now that's waht I call music 7" or whatever number it was?

Hope this helps. If my comments are useful, please consider peer reviewing an article, especially one at Wikipedia:Peer review/backlog (which is how I found this article). Yours, Ruhrfisch ><>°° 18:41, 22 March 2009 (UTC)