Wikipedia:WikiProject Missing encyclopedic articles/Antarctica/E1

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Eadie Island[edit]

'''Eadie Island''' ({{coor dm|61|28|S|55|57|W|}}) is an [[island]] 1 nautical mile (1.9 km) long which lies between Aspland and O'[[Brien Islands]], in the [[South Shetland Islands]]. The island was charted in February 1821 by a Russian expedition under Bellingshausen, who gave the name "[[Ostrova Tri Brata]]" (three brothers islands) for the present Aspland, Eadie and O'Brien Islands. Eadie Island was named by Lieutenant [[L.C. Hill]], [[Royal Navy Reserve]], captain of the [[Discovery II]], which engaged in survey work in the area in 1936-37, for the dockyard manager of the [[Melbourne Harbour Trust]] of Williamstown, Australia.

== See also ==
* [[List of antarctic and sub-antarctic islands]]

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[[Category:Sub-antarctic islands]]

Eady Ice Piedmont[edit]

'''Eady Ice Piedmont''' ({{coor dm|78|31|S|165|20|E|}}) is the ice piedmont lying south of [[Mount Discovery]] and [[Minna Bluff]], merging at the south side with the [[Ross Ice Shelf]]. Mapped by [[United States Geological Survey]] (USGS) from ground surveys and Navy air phtos. Named by [[Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names]] (US-ACAN) in 1963 for Captain [[Jack A. Eady]], [[U.S. Navy]], Chief of Staff to the Commander, [[U.S. Naval Support Force]], Antarctica, from July 1959 to April 1962.

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica]]

Eagle Cove[edit]

'''Eagle Cove''' ({{coor dm|63|24|S|57|0|W|}}) is a small [[cove]] immediately west of [[Seal Point]] along the south side of [[Hope Bay]], at the northeast end of [[Antarctic Peninsula]]. Discovered by [[J. Gunnar Andersson]]'s party of the [[Swedish Antarctic Expedition]], 1901-04, who wintered at Hope Bay in 1903. Named by the [[Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey]] (FIDS) after the ship Eagle, which participated in the establishment of the FIDS base at Hope Bay in 1945.

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica]]

Eagle Island[edit]

'''Eagle Island''' ({{coor dm|63|40|S|57|29|W|}}) is an [[island]] 5 nautical miles (9 km) long and 4 nautical miles (7 km) wide, rising to 560 m on the northeast side. It is the largest island in the archipelago which lies between [[Trinity Peninsula]] and [[Vega Island]]. Probably first seen by a party under [[J. Gunnar Andersson]] of the [[Swedish Antarctic Expedition]], 1901-04. Eagle Island was charted in 1945 by the [[Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey]] (FIDS) and named after the ship Eagle, used by the FIDS.

== See also ==
* [[List of antarctic and sub-antarctic islands]]

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[[Category:Sub-antarctic islands]]

Earle Island[edit]

'''Earle Island''' ({{coor dm|63|29|S|54|47|W|}}) is a small [[island]] 3 nautical miles (6 km) southwest of [[Darwin Island]] and marking the southwest end of [[Danger Islands]], q.v. Following work in the area from HMS about 1790), artist in HMS Beagle, in association with [[Beagle Island]] and other names in the group.

== See also ==
* [[List of antarctic and sub-antarctic islands]]

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[[Category:Sub-antarctic islands]]

Early Bluff[edit]

'''Early Bluff''' ({{coor dm|75|13|S|113|57|W|}}) is a high bluff on the south side of [[Kohler Range]] in [[Marie Byrd Land]]. It stands at the east side of [[Kohler Glacier]] at the point where this distributary drains northward from [[Smith Glacier]]. Mapped by [[United States Geological Survey]] (USGS) from surveys and [[U.S. Navy]] air photos, 1959-66. Named by [[Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names]] (US-ACAN) after [[Thomas O. Early]], [[United States Antarctic Research Program]] (USARP) geologist with the [[Marie Byrd Land Survey Party]], 1966-67.

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica]]

Early Islands[edit]

'''Early Islands''' ({{coor dm|73|40|S|101|40|W|}}) is a group of small islands lying just west of [[Cosgrove Ice Shelf]] in the southeast corner of [[Ferrero Bay]], [[Amundsen Sea]]. Mapped by [[United States Geological Survey]] (USGS) from ground surveys and [[U.S. Navy]] air photos, 1960-66. Named by [[Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names]] (US-ACAN) for [[Tommy Joe Early]], biologist with the [[Ellsworth Land Survey]], 1968-69.

== See also ==
* [[List of antarctic and sub-antarctic islands]]

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[[Category:Islands of Antarctica]]

Mount Early[edit]

'''Mount Early''' ({{coor dm|87|4|S|153|46|W|}}) is a solitary [[volcano|volcanic cone]] (2,720 m) standing 13 nautical miles (24 km) north of D'[[Angelo Bluff]], on the west side and near the head of [[Scott Glacier]]. Discovered in December 1934 from nearby [[Mount Weaver]] by the [[Byrd Antarctic Expedition]] geological party led by [[Quin Blackburn]]. Visited by the [[Ohio State University]] geological party led by [[George Doumani]] on [[November 21]], [[1962]]. Named by [[Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names]] (US-ACAN) after Captain [[Neal E. Early]], USA, a member of the aviation unit that supported the [[United States Geological Survey]] (USGS) [[Topo East]] survey of this area, 1962-63.

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[[Category:Mountains of Antarctica|Early, Mount]]

Earnshaw Glacier[edit]

'''Earnshaw Glacier''' ({{coor dm|68|45|S|65|11|W|}}) is a [[glacier]] 10 nautical miles (18 km) long, flowing northward to the east of [[Norwood Scarp]] and entering [[Maitland Glacier]] to the south of [[Werner Peak]], in eastern [[Antarctic Peninsula]]. Photographed from the air by the [[United States Antarctic Service]] (USAS) on [[September 28]], [[1940]]. Surveyed by the [[Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey]] (FIDS) in January 1961. Named by [[United Kingdom Antarctic Place-Names Committee]] (UK-APC) after [[Thomas Earnshaw]] (1749-1829), English watchmaker who made innovations leading to the modern marine chronometer.

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[[Category:Glaciers of Antarctica]]

East Aisle Ridge[edit]

'''East Aisle Ridge''' ({{coor dm|78|21|S|163|23|E|}}) is a named from the position of the ridge in a group of three ridges in relation to [[The Stage]].

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica]]

East Arm[edit]

'''East Arm''' ({{coor dm|67|36|S|62|53|E|}}) is a rock mass forming the eastern limit of [[Horseshoe Harbor]] in [[Holme Bay]], Mac. [[Robertson Land]]. Roughly mapped by Norwegian cartographers from air photos taken by the [[Lars Christensen Expedition]], 1936-37. Rephotographed by [[U.S. Navy Operation Highjump]], 1946-47. First visited by an ANARE ([[Australian National Antarctic Research Expeditions]]) party on [[February 5]], [[1954]]. Named by ANARE.

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica]]

East Bay[edit]

'''East Bay''' ({{coor dm|54|4|S|37|9|W|}}) is a [[bay]], 0.5 nautical miles (0.9 km) wide, indenting the east portion of [[Prince Olav Harbor]], [[South Georgia]]. The name, which is descriptive of position, was given by a British expedition under Shackleton which visited South Georgia in 1921-22.

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica]]

East Beacon[edit]

'''East Beacon''' ({{coor dm|77|50|S|160|52|E|}}) is the prominent eastern [[peak]], rising to 2,265 m in [[Beacon Heights]], in the [[Quartermain Mountains]], [[Victoria Land]]. [[Named East Beacon]] by the [[New Zealand Geological Survey Antarctic Expedition]] (NZGSAE), 1958-59.

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica]]

East Budd Island[edit]

'''East Budd Island''' ({{coor dm|67|35|S|62|51|E|}}) is the eastern of two larger islands at the north end of the [[Flat Islands]] in [[Holme Bay]], Mac. [[Robertson Land]]. Mapped by Norwegian cartographers from air photos taken by the [[Lars Christensen Expedition]], 1936-37, who named the northern islands Flatoynalane (the flat [[island]] needles). This island was named by [[Antarctic Names Committee of Australia]] (ANCA) for Dr. [[G.M. Budd]], medical officer at [[Mawson Station]] in 1959.

== See also ==
* [[List of antarctic and sub-antarctic islands]]

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[[Category:Islands of Antarctica]]

East Cape[edit]

'''East Cape''' ({{coor dm|60|38|S|45|11|W|}}) is a cape 1.4 nautical miles (2.6 km) southeast of [[Cape Bennett]] on the north coast of [[Coronation Island]], in the [[South Orkney Islands]]. Discovered and roughly charted in the course of the joint cruise by Captain [[George Powell]] and Captain [[Nathaniel Palmer]] in December 1821. Named by DI personnel on the [[Discovery II]] who charted the South Orkney Islands in 1933. It is the easternmost cape on the north coast of Coronation Island.

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica]]

East Egerton[edit]

'''East Egerton''' ({{coor dm|80|50|S|158|6|E|}}) is a prominent [[peak]], 2,815 m, rising 2 nautical miles (3.7 km) east of [[Mount Egerton]] in the [[Churchill Mountains]]. Mapped by the [[New Zealand Geological Survey Antarctic Expedition]] (NZGSAE) (1960-61) and named in association with Mount Egerton.

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica]]

East Groin[edit]

'''East Groin''' ({{coor dm|77|39|S|160|57|E|}}) is a narrow rock spur that forms the east wall of [[Flory Cirque]] on the south side of [[Asgard Range]], [[Victoria Land]]. The descriptive name was given by [[Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names]] (US-ACAN) in 1976 and is in association with the nearby [[West Groin]], named by the [[British Antarctic Expedition]] (1910-13) under Captain [[Robert F. Scott]].

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica]]

East Melchior Islands[edit]

'''East Melchior Islands''' ({{coor dm|64|19|S|62|55|W|}}) is a group of small ice-covered islands and rocks which lie east of [[The Sound]] in the [[Melchior Islands]], [[Palmer Archipelago]]. The islands west of The Sound are called [[West Melchior Islands]]. The name was probably given by DI personnel who roughly charted these islands in 1927. The islands were surveyed by Argentine expeditions in 1942, 1943 and 1948.

== See also ==
* [[List of antarctic and sub-antarctic islands]]

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[[Category:Sub-antarctic islands]]

East Ongul Island[edit]

'''East Ongul Island''' ({{coor dm|69|1|S|39|35|E|}}) is an [[island]], 1 nautical mile (1.9 km) long, lying immediately east of the north part of [[Ongul Island]] at the east side of the entrance of [[Lutzow-Holm Bay]]. This island was originally mapped as a part of Ongul Island by Norwegian cartographers who worked from air photos taken by the [[Lars Christensen Expedition]], 1936-37. A strait separating this island from Ongul Island was discovered in 1957 by the [[Japanese Antarctic Research Expedition]] (JARE). They named this small island for its position with relation to Ongul Island.

== See also ==
* [[List of antarctic and sub-antarctic islands]]

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[[Category:Islands of Antarctica]]

East Point[edit]

'''East Point''' ({{coor dm|54|11|S|36|32|W|}}) is a point between [[Jason Harbor]] and [[Allen Bay]] in [[Cumberland West Bay]], [[South Georgia]]. The point was charted and probably named by DI between 1926-29.

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica]]

East Quartzite Range[edit]

'''East Quartzite Range''' ({{coor dm|72|0|S|165|5|E|}}) is a range, 12 nautical miles (22 km) long, forming a subordinate southwest unit of [[King Range]], in the [[Concord Mountains]]. It lies 5 nautical miles (9 km) east of [[West Quartzite Range]]. Named by the [[Northern Party]] of NZFMCAE, 1962-63, after the distinctive geological formation of the feature.

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[[Category:Mountain ranges of Antarctica]]

East Skerry[edit]

'''East Skerry''' ({{coor dm|54|15|S|36|18|W|}}) is a small group of islands and rocks forming the east part of [[Skrap Skerries]], lying 2 nautical miles (3.7 km) northwest of [[Cape George]], off the north coast of [[South Georgia]]. The name was applied in the period 1926-30 by DI personnel who charted these islands.

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica]]

East Stack[edit]

'''East Stack''' ({{coor dm|67|5|S|58|12|E|}}) is a coastal rock outcrop which rises to 60 m on the east side of [[Hoseason Glacier]], 16 nautical miles (30 km) southeast of [[Edward VIII Bay]]. Discovered in February 1936 by DI personnel on the [[Willam Scoresby]], and probably so named by them for its distinctive appearance and association with nearby [[West Stack]].

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica]]

Eastface Nunatak[edit]

'''Eastface Nunatak''' ({{coor dm|78|42|S|163|38|E|}}) is a small [[nunatak]] about 11 nautical miles (20 km) south of [[Mount Morning]] in [[Victoria Land]]. It is ice covered with a conspicuous rock face on the east side. Mapped by [[United States Geological Survey]] (USGS) from ground surveys and Navy air photos. Given this descriptive name by [[Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names]] (US-ACAN) in 1963.

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[[Category:Mountains of Antarctica]]

Mount Eastman[edit]

'''Mount Eastman''' ({{coor dm|65|10|S|62|59|W|}}) is a [[mountain]] overlooking the head of [[Flandres Bay]], 4 nautical miles (7 km) south of [[Pelletan Point]] on the west coast of [[Graham Land]]. Charted by the [[Belgian Antarctic Expedition]] under Gerlache, 1897-99. Named by the [[United Kingdom Antarctic Place-Names Committee]] (UK-APC) in 1960 for [[George Eastman]] (1854-1932), American inventor, manufacturer and philanthropist who, with [[W.H. Walker]], produced the first practicable photographic rollfilm camera (Kodak) in 1888.

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[[Category:Mountains of Antarctica|Eastman, Mount]]

Eastwind Glacier[edit]

'''Eastwind Glacier''' ({{coor dm|77|37|S|168|16|E|}}) is a [[glacier]] that drains part of the south slopes of [[Mount Terror]] in southeast [[Ross Island]]. It flows southwest and coalesces with the east margin of [[Terror Glacier]] where the two glaciers enter [[Fog Bay]]. In association with the names of expedition ships grouped on this [[island]], named after USCGC Eastwind. An icebreaker, "she" made nine Antarctic deployments in support of science activities from [[U.S. Navy Operation Deepfreeze]], 1955-56, through the 1966-67 season.

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[[Category:Glaciers of Antarctica]]

Eastwind Ridge[edit]

'''Eastwind Ridge''' ({{coor dm|76|36|S|160|47|E|}}) is a broad, partially ice-covered ridge about 10 nautical miles (18 km) long between the Chattahoochee and [[Towle Glaciers]] in the [[Convoy Range]]. Mapped by [[United States Geological Survey]] (USGS) from ground surveys and Navy air photos. Named by [[Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names]] (US-ACAN) in 1964 for the USCGC Eastwind, an icebreaker in several American convoys into [[McMurdo Sound]] since the 1958-59 season.

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica]]

Mount Eather[edit]

'''Mount Eather''' ({{coor dm|70|29|S|65|50|E|}}) is a [[mountain]] about 2 nautical miles (3.7 km) south of [[Martin Massif]] in the [[Porthos Range]], [[Prince Charles Mountains]]. Plotted from ANARE ([[Australian National Antarctic Research Expeditions]]) air photos. Named for [[R.H. Eather]], auroral physicist at [[Mawson Station]] in 1963.

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[[Category:Mountains of Antarctica|Eather, Mount]]

Eaton Nunatak[edit]

'''Eaton Nunatak''' ({{coor dm|75|10|S|72|0|W|}}) is a prominent [[nunatak]] marking the southeast extremity of the [[Merrick Mountains]], in [[Ellsworth Land]]. Mapped by [[United States Geological Survey]] (USGS) from surveys and [[U.S. Navy]] air photos, 1961-67. Named by [[Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names]] (US-ACAN) for [[John W. Eaton]], aurora scientist at [[Eights Station]] in 1963.

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[[Category:Mountains of Antarctica]]

Ebbe Glacier[edit]

'''Ebbe Glacier''' ({{coor dm|71|3|S|164|45|E|}}) is a tributary [[glacier]] about 60 nautical miles (110 km) long, draining northwest from the [[Homerun Range]] and [[Robinson Heights]], and then west-northwest between [[Everett Range]] and [[Anare Mountains]] into [[Lillie Glacier]]. This feature saddles with [[Tucker Glacier]], the latter draining southeast to the [[Ross Sea]]. Mapped by [[United States Geological Survey]] (USGS) from surveys and air photos by [[U.S. Navy Squadron VX]]-6, 1960-62. Named by [[Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names]] (US-ACAN) for Commander [[Gordon K. Ebbe]], commanding officer of [[Squadron VX]]-6 from June 1955 to June 1956.

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[[Category:Glaciers of Antarctica]]

Eblen Hills[edit]

'''Eblen Hills''' ({{coor dm|85|51|S|133|28|W|}}) is a cluster of precipitous rock hills, 1,640 m, rising just north of the mouth of [[Colorado Glacier]] where the latter enters the west side of [[Reedy Glacier]]. Mapped by [[United States Geological Survey]] (USGS) from surveys and [[U.S. Navy]] air photos, 1960-64. Named by [[Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names]] (US-ACAN) for [[James C. Eblen]], aviation machinist with the [[McMurdo Station]] winter party of 1959, a participant in several [[U.S. Navy Deep Freeze]] expeditions.

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica]]

Ebon Pond[edit]

'''Ebon Pond''' ({{coor dm|77|11|S|165|11|E|}}) is a pond located in the southwest extremity of [[Brown Peninsula]] in [[Victoria Land]]. First studied on the ground by U.S. geologist [[Troy L. Pewe]] during [[U.S. Navy Operation Deepfreeze]], 1957-58. So named by him because of the black volcanic terrain which entirely surrounds the pond.

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica]]

Ebony Ridge[edit]

'''Ebony Ridge''' ({{coor dm|83|46|S|172|46|E|}}) is a coastal ridge 5 nautical miles (9 km) long between [[Airdrop Peak]] and [[Mount Robert Scott]] at the north end of the [[Commonwealth Range]]. It consists of dark metamorphosed greywacke contrasting sharply with the predominate brown ochre of the weathered surface of the granitic intrusions forming nearby [[Mounts Kyffin]] and Harcourt. Descriptively named by the [[New Zealand Alpine Club Antarctic Expedition]], 1959-60.

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica]]

Ebony Wall[edit]

'''Ebony Wall''' ({{coor dm|63|55|S|59|9|W|}}) is a dark, nearly vertical rock wall which rises about 400 m at the head of [[Pettus Glacier]]. The wall is about 2 nautical miles (3.7 km) long and forms a part of the west escarpment of [[Detroit Plateau]] near the base of [[Trinity Peninsula]]. Charted in 1948 by [[Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey]] (FIDS) who applied the descriptive name.

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica]]

Echelmeyer Ice Stream[edit]

'''Echelmeyer Ice Stream''' ({{coor dm|79|10|S|150|0|W|}}) is an [[ice stream]] flowing west to [[Shirase Coast]] to the north of [[MacAyeal Ice Stream]]. It is one of several major ice streams draining from [[Marie Byrd Land]] into the [[Ross Ice Shelf]]. The ice streams were investigated and mapped by [[United States Antarctic Research Program]] (USARP) personnel in a number of field seasons from 1983-84 and named [[Ice Stream]] A, B, C, etc., according to their position from south to north. The name was changed by [[Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names]] (US-ACAN) in 2002 to honor [[Keith A. Echelmeyer]], [[Geophysical Institute]], University of Alaska, Fairbanks, AK, who studied the flow of Marie Byrd Land ice streams, 1992-93 and 1994-95, as well as fast flow of surging glaciers in Alaska and Greenland.

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica]]

Echo Mountain[edit]

'''Echo Mountain''' ({{coor dm|60|37|S|45|41|W|}}) is a conspicuous [[mountain]], 790 m, surmounting the west side of [[Laws Glacier]] close north of [[Cragsman Peaks]] on [[Coronation Island]], in the [[South Orkney Islands]]. Surveyed in 1948-49 by the [[Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey]] (FIDS), and so named by them because of the remarkable echoing noted in this part of Laws Glacier.

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[[Category:Mountains of Antarctica]]

Echo Pass[edit]

'''Echo Pass''' ({{coor dm|54|17|S|36|33|W|}}) is a pass, 305 m in elevation, lying 1.5 nautical miles (2.8 km) southwest of Grytviken, [[South Georgia]], in the chain of mountains which extends southwest from [[Mount Hodges]]. The pass provides a ski route from the station at Grytviken to the head of [[Cumberland West Bay]]. The name is used on the chart of a German expedition 1928-29, under [[Kohl-Larsen]], who states that the name was already in use by whalers.

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica]]

Eckener Point[edit]

'''Eckener Point''' ({{coor dm|64|26|S|61|36|W|}}) is a point marking the northeast side of the entrance to [[Charlotte Bay]], on the west coast of [[Graham Land]]. First roughly charted by the [[Belgian Antarctic Expedition]] under Gerlache, 1897-99. Named by the [[United Kingdom Antarctic Place-Names Committee]] (UK-APC) in 1960 for [[Hugo Eckener]] (1868-1954), German pioneer of airship aviation, president of Aeroarctic, an international society for exploration of the Arctic with airships, 1929-37, who piloted the [[Graf Zeppelin]] for more than 600 flights including a major Arctic flight in 1931.

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica]]

Eckhorner Peaks[edit]

'''Eckhorner Peaks''' ({{coor dm|71|31|S|11|27|E|}}) is a series of about six peaks that form the north wall of [[Schussel Cirque]], in the north-central [[Humboldt Mountains]] of [[Queen Maud Land]]. Discovered and given the descriptive name [[Eck-Horner]] (corner peaks) by the [[German Antarctic Expedition]], 1938-39, under Ritscher.

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[[Category:Mountains of Antarctica]]

Eckins Nunatak[edit]

'''Eckins Nunatak''' ({{coor dm|85|7|S|175|51|W|}}) is a small, isolated [[nunatak]] lying 5 nautical miles (9 km) northeast of [[Matador Mountain]], in the east part of [[Shackleton Glacier]]. Named by [[Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names]] (US-ACAN) for [[Henry J. Eckins]], [[United States Antarctic Research Program]] (USARP) meteorologist at [[South Pole Station]], winter 1961.

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[[Category:Mountains of Antarctica]]

Eckman Bluff[edit]

'''Eckman Bluff''' ({{coor dm|74|47|S|110|22|W|}}) is an angular bluff, mostly ice covered but with a steep southeast rock face, rising to about 350 m in the south part of [[Jones Bluffs]], [[Bear Peninsula]], on the [[Walgreen Coast]], [[Marie Byrd Land]]. Mapped by [[United States Geological Survey]] (USGS) from surveys and [[U.S. Navy]] aerial photographs taken 1966. Named by [[Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names]] (US-ACAN) after Commander [[James F. Eckman]], USCG, [[Engineer Officer]] on USCGC [[Burton Island]], 1970-71; ([[Executive Officer]], 1975-76); [[Ship Operations Officer]] on the staff of the Commander, [[Naval Support Force]], Antarctica, 1977-78 and 1978-79.

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica]]

Ecology Glacier[edit]

'''Ecology Glacier''' ({{coor dm|62|11|S|58|28|W|}}) is a [[glacier]] flowing northeast into [[Admiralty Bay]], [[King George Island]], north of [[Llano Point]]. Named by the [[Polish Antarctic Expedition]], 1980, after the Institute of Ecology of the [[Polish Academy]] of Sciences, sponsor of nearby [[Arcktowski Station]].

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[[Category:Glaciers of Antarctica]]

Eddy Col[edit]

'''Eddy Col''' ({{coor dm|63|26|S|57|6|W|}}) is a steep-sided rocky col between [[Mount Taylor]] and [[Blade Ridge]], 1.5 nautical miles (2.8 km) southwest of the head of [[Hope Bay]] on [[Trinity Peninsula]]. Surveyed in 1955 by the [[Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey]] (FIDS), who applied the descriptive name; the wind direction varies continually in this col.

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica]]

Eddy Point[edit]

'''Eddy Point''' ({{coor dm|62|14|S|58|59|W|}}) is a small point on the south side of [[Fildes Peninsula]], 0.5 nautical miles (0.9 km) west of [[Halfthree Point]] on [[King George Island]], in the [[South Shetland Islands]]. Charted and named by DI personnel on the [[Discovery II]] in 1935. The feature is used as a reference point for locating the rocks which lie along the route of boats passing through [[Fildes Strait]].

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica]]

Eddystone Rocks[edit]

'''Eddystone Rocks''' ({{coor dm|62|36|S|61|23|W|}}) is a group of rocks lying 4.5 nautical miles (8 km) west-southwest of [[Start Point]], [[Livingston Island]], in the [[South Shetland Islands]]. The name dates back to about 1822 and is now established in international usage.

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica]]

Eden Glacier[edit]

'''Eden Glacier''' ({{coor dm|66|12|S|63|15|W|}}) is a [[glacier]] 5 nautical miles (9 km) long, which flows in a southerly direction into the head of [[Cabinet Inlet]], northwest of [[Lyttelton Ridge]], on the east coast of [[Graham Land]]. Charted by the [[Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey]] (FIDS) and photographed from the air by the [[Ronne Antarctic Research Expedition]] (RARE) in 1947. Named by the FIDS for Rt. Hon. [[Robert Anthony Eden]], M.P., then [[British Secretary]] of State for [[Foreign Affairs]] and member of the [[War Cabinet]].

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[[Category:Glaciers of Antarctica]]

Eden Rocks[edit]

'''Eden Rocks''' ({{coor dm|63|29|S|55|40|W|}}) is a two rocks lying just off the east end of [[Dundee Island]], off the north end of [[Antarctic Peninsula]]. A small [[island]] was reported here by Captain [[James Ross]], [[Royal Navy]], on [[December 30]], [[1842]]. He named it "[[Eden Island]]" for Captain [[Charles Eden]], RN. Following survey by [[Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey]] (FIDS) in 1953, it was reported that the feature consists of two rocks lying close together.

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica]]

Edge Glacier[edit]

'''Edge Glacier''' ({{coor dm|82|29|S|51|7|W|}}) is a small cliff-type [[glacier]] draining northward into [[Davis Valley]] in northeast [[Dufek Massif]], [[Pensacola Mountains]]. Mapped by [[United States Geological Survey]] (USGS) from surveys and [[U.S. Navy]] air photos, 1956-66. Named by [[Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names]] (US-ACAN) for [[Joseph L. Edge]], photographer with [[U.S. Navy Squadron VX]]-6 on [[Operation Deep Freeze]] 1963 and 1964.

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[[Category:Glaciers of Antarctica]]

Edge Rocks[edit]

'''Edge Rocks''' ({{coor dm|83|59|S|52|55|W|}}) is a two rock exposures at the southeast margin of [[Iroquois Plateau]], 11 nautical miles (20 km) east of [[Hill Nunatak]], in the [[Pensacola Mountains]]. Mapped by [[United States Geological Survey]] (USGS) from surveys and [[U.S. Navy]] air photos, 1956-66. Given this name by [[Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names]] (US-ACAN) because of their fringe position with relation to Iroquois Plateau.

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica]]

Edgell Bay[edit]

'''Edgell Bay''' ({{coor dm|62|16|S|58|59|W|}}) is a [[bay]] 1.5 nautical miles (2.8 km) long and wide, indenting the northeast side of [[Nelson Island]], in the [[South Shetland Islands]]. This bay appears in rough outline on Powell's chart of the South Shetland Islands published in 1822. It was recharted during 1934-35 by DI personnel on the [[Augustine Edgell]], RN.

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica]]

Mount Edgell[edit]

'''Mount Edgell''' ({{coor dm|69|26|S|68|16|W|}}) is a [[mountain]], 1,675 m, rising eastward of [[Cape Jeremy]], the east side of the north entrance to [[George VI Sound]], on the west coast of [[Antarctic Peninsula]]. Discovered by the [[French Antarctic Expedition]] under Charcot, 1908-10. Seen from a great distance and thought to be an [[island]], he named it "[[Ile Gordon Bennett]]" for [[James Gordon Bennett]] (1841-1918) of the [[New York Herald]], who gave financial aid to the expedition. The [[British Graham Land Expedition]] (BGLE) under Rymill, surveying this area in 1936-37 and finding no island, applied the name Mount Edgell to the feature now recognized as Charcot's "Ile Gordon Bennett." The name Mount Edgell, after [[Sir John Augustine Edgell]], Hydrographer of the [[British Navy]], 1932-45, has since become established through international usage.

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[[Category:Mountains of Antarctica|Edgell, Mount]]

Edgeworth Glacier[edit]

'''Edgeworth Glacier''' ({{coor dm|64|23|S|59|55|W|}}) is a [[glacier]] 12 nautical miles (22 km) long, flowing southwest from the edge of [[Detroit Plateau]] below [[Wolseley Buttress]] to the [[ice shelf]] west of [[Sobral Peninsula]], [[Graham Land]]. Mapped from surveys by [[Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey]] (FIDS) (1960-61). Named by [[United Kingdom Antarctic Place-Names Committee]] (UK-APC) for [[Richard L. Edgeworth]] (1744-1817), English inventor of the "portable railway," the first track-laying vehicle, in 1770.

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[[Category:Glaciers of Antarctica]]

Edholm Point[edit]

'''Edholm Point''' ({{coor dm|66|15|S|67|4|W|}}) is the northwestern point of [[Krogh Island]], [[Biscoe Islands]]. Mapped from air photos by [[Falkland Islands and Dependencies Aerial Survey Expedition]] (FIDASE) (1956-57). Named by [[United Kingdom Antarctic Place-Names Committee]] (UK-APC) for [[Otto G. Edholm]], British physiologist, Head of the Division of [[Human Physiology]] of the [[National Institute]] for [[Medical Research]] since its foundation in 1949, who has specialized in studies of the effects of cold on man.

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica]]

Edinburgh Hill[edit]

'''Edinburgh Hill''' ({{coor dm|62|33|S|60|1|W|}}) is a conspicuous volcanic knob forming the north side of the entrance to [[Moon Bay]] in the east part of [[Livingston Island]], in the [[South Shetland Islands]]. Photographed and named by Scottish geologist [[David Ferguson]] in 1913-14. The feature was renamed [[High Point]] in 1935 by DI personnel on the [[Discovery II]] but the original name has been approved.

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica]]

Edisto Channel[edit]

'''Edisto Channel''' ({{coor dm|66|5|S|100|50|E|}}) is a channel, whose south end is filled by [[Edisto Ice Tongue]]. It extends in a NE-SW direction between the [[Taylor Islands]] and the northwest islands of the [[Highjump Archipelago]] on the west, and the [[Bunger Hills]], [[Thomas Island]], and the remaining islands in the Highjump Archipelago on the east. Delineated from aerial photographs taken by [[U.S. Navy Operation Highjump]], 1946-47, and named by the [[Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names]] (US-ACAN) for the USS which assisted in establishing astronomical control stations along [[Wilhelm II]], [[Queen Mary]], Knox and [[Budd Coasts]].

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Edisto Glacier[edit]

'''Edisto Glacier''' ({{coor dm|72|27|S|169|53|E|}}) is a [[glacier]] flowing northeast between [[Felsite Island]] and [[Redcastle Ridge]] into the head of [[Edisto Inlet]]. Named by the [[New Zealand Geological Survey Antarctic Expedition]] (NZGSAE), 1957-58, for the USS Edisto, first vessel to visit the Edisto Inlet area.

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[[Category:Glaciers of Antarctica]]

Edisto Ice Tongue[edit]

'''Edisto Ice Tongue''' ({{coor dm|66|10|S|100|40|E|}}) is an ice tongue along the northwest margin of [[Bunger Hills]] where it occupies the southwestern portion of [[Edisto Channel]], in the [[Highjump Archipelago]]. The ice tongue is a seaward extension of the flow of [[Apfel Glacier]] as well as part of the main flow of [[Scott Glacier]]. Mapped from air photos taken by [[U.S. Navy Operation Highjump]], 1946-47. Named by [[Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names]] (US-ACAN) in association with Edisto Channel.

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Edisto Inlet[edit]

'''Edisto Inlet''' ({{coor dm|72|20|S|170|5|E|}}) is a rectangular arm of [[Moubray Bay]], 7 nautical miles (13 km) long and 3 nautical miles (6 km) wide, entered between [[Cape Hallett]] and [[Cape Christie]]. The USS this branch of Moubray Bay in February 1956, and the name [[Edisto Bay]] was given at that time. Edisto Inlet has overtaken the earlier name in usage.

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Edisto Rocks[edit]

'''Edisto Rocks''' ({{coor dm|68|13|S|67|8|W|}}) is a low rocks 1.2 nautical miles (2.2 km) southwest of the west tip of [[Neny Island]], lying in [[Marguerite Bay]] off the west coast of [[Graham Land]]. Surveyed in 1947 by the [[Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey]] (FIDS) and named for the USS Edisto, icebreaker with [[U.S. Navy Operation Windmill]], which visited Marguerite Bay in February 1948 and assisted in the relief of the [[Ronne Antarctic Research Expedition]] (RARE) and FIDS parties on [[Stonington Island]].

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica]]

Mount Edixon[edit]

'''Mount Edixon''' ({{coor dm|71|49|S|163|35|E|}}) is a [[mountain]], 2,080 m, located 6 nautical miles (11 km) southeast of [[Bowers Peak]] in the [[Lanterman Range]], [[Bowers Mountains]]. Named by the northern party of [[New Zealand Geological Survey Antarctic Expedition]] (NZGSAE), 1963-64, for Lieutenant [[James R. Edixon]], pilot with [[U.S. Navy Squadron VX]]-6, who, with considerable willingness and skill, was responsible for the expedition's air support.

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[[Category:Mountains of Antarctica|Edixon, Mount]]

Edlin Neve[edit]

'''Edlin Neve''' ({{coor dm|71|10|S|163|6|E|}}) is a neve at the south side of [[Mount Sturm]] in the [[Bowers Mountains]]. Several glaciers, including the Carryer, Irwin, [[McLin]] and Graveson, are nourished by this neve. Named by [[New Zealand Geological Survey Antarctic Expedition]] (NZGSAE), 1967-68, for [[G. Edlin]], who served as postmaster at [[Scott Base]] and assisted in the field during this expedition.

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica]]

Edman Island[edit]

'''Edman Island''' ({{coor dm|66|18|S|110|32|E|}}) is an [[island]] near the center of O'[[Brien Bay]], [[Budd Coast]]. First mapped from air photos taken by [[U.S. Navy Operation Highjump]] and [[Operation Windmill]] in 1947 and 1948. Named by the [[Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names]] (US-ACAN) for [[Donald H. Edman]], ionospheric scientist and member of the [[Wilkes Station]] party of 1958.

== See also ==
* [[List of antarctic and sub-antarctic islands]]

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[[Category:Sub-antarctic islands]]

Edmonson Point[edit]

'''Edmonson Point''' ({{coor dm|74|20|S|165|8|E|}}) is a rounded, largely ice-free point lying below [[Mount Melbourne]] along the west side of [[Wood Bay]], [[Victoria Land]]. Mapped by [[United States Geological Survey]] (USGS) from surveys and [[U.S. Navy]] air photos, 1955-63. Named by [[Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names]] (US-ACAN) for [[Larry D. Edmonson]], satellite geodesy scientist at [[McMurdo Station]], winter party 1966.

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Mount Edred[edit]

'''Mount Edred''' ({{coor dm|70|35|S|69|0|W|}}) is a prominent ice-covered [[mountain]], 2,195 m, which stands 10 nautical miles (18 km) inland from [[George VI Sound]] and marks the south limit of [[Douglas Range]] on [[Alexander Island]]. First photographed from the air on [[November 23]], [[1935]] by [[Lincoln Ellsworth]] and mapped from these photos by [[W.L.G. Joerg]]. Its east side was roughly surveyed in 1936 by the [[British Graham Land Expedition]] (BGLE) and resurveyed in 1949 by the [[Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey]] (FIDS). Named by the FIDS for Edred, Saxon king of England, 946-955. The west face of the mountain was mapped from air photos taken by the [[Ronne Antarctic Research Expedition]] (RARE), 1947-48, by Searle of the FIDS in 1960.

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[[Category:Mountains of Antarctica|Edred, Mount]]

Edson Hills[edit]

'''Edson Hills''' ({{coor dm|79|50|S|83|39|W|}}) is a group of mainly ice-free hills lying south of [[Drake Icefall]] and west of [[Union Glacier]] in the [[Heritage Range]], [[Ellsworth Mountains]]. Named by the University of [[Minnesota Ellsworth Mountains Party]], 1962-63, for [[Dean T. Edson]], [[United States Geological Survey]] (USGS) topographic engineer with the party.

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica]]

Edward Ridge[edit]

'''Edward Ridge''' ({{coor dm|67|15|S|55|34|E|}}) is a gently rising, snow-covered ridge standing 13 nautical miles (24 km) northwest of [[Rayner Peak]] in [[Enderby Land]]. Plotted from air photos taken from ANARE ([[Australian National Antarctic Research Expeditions]]) aircraft in 1959. Named by [[Antarctic Names Committee of Australia]] (ANCA) for [[Edward Nash]], aircraft mechanic with the ANARE ([[Nella Dan]]), under [[Phillip Law]] in 1965.

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica]]

Edward VII Peninsula[edit]

'''Edward VII Peninsula''' ({{coor dm|77|40|S|155|0|W|}}) is a large ice-covered [[peninsula]] which forms the northwest extremity of [[Marie Byrd Land]] and projects into the [[Ross Sea]] between [[Sulzberger Bay]] and the northeast corner of the [[Ross Ice Shelf]]. Discovered on [[January 30]], [[1902]], by the ''Discovery'' expedition under Scott, who named it [[King Edward VII Land]] for the King of England. Its peninsular character was determined by exploration conducted by the [[Byrd Antarctic Expedition]] (1933-35) and the [[United States Antarctic Service]] (USAS) (1939-41).

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Edward VIII Bay[edit]

'''Edward VIII Bay''' ({{coor dm|66|50|S|57|0|E|}}) is a [[bay]] about 20 nautical miles (37 km) in extent, entered between [[Edward VIII Plateau]] and the [[Oygarden Group]]. Discovered in 1936 by DI personnel on the [[William Scoresby]], and named for [[Edward VIII]], then King of England.

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica]]

Edward VIII Ice Shelf[edit]

'''Edward VIII Ice Shelf''' ({{coor dm|66|50|S|56|33|E|}}) is an [[ice shelf]] occupying the head of [[Edward VIII Bay]]. The northern part of this feature was called Innviksletta (the inner [[bay]] plain) by Norwegian cartographers, who mapped it from aerial photos taken by the [[Lars Christensen Expedition]], 1936-37. The area was first visited in 1954 by an ANARE ([[Australian National Antarctic Research Expeditions]]) sledge party. The entire ice shelf was then mapped and named in association with Edward VIII Bay.

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica]]

Edward VIII Plateau[edit]

'''Edward VIII Plateau''' ({{coor dm|66|35|S|56|50|E|}}) is a dome-shaped, ice-covered [[peninsula]] between [[Magnet Bay]] and [[Edward VIII Bay]]. Probably seen by personnel on the [[William Scoresby]] in 1936. Mapped by Norwegian cartographers from aerial photos taken by the [[Lars Christensen Expedition]], 1936-37, and named Gulfplataet (the gulf plateau). It was renamed [[King Edward Plateau]] by [[Antarctic Names Committee of Australia]] (ANCA), but the form Edward VIII Plateau has been approved by the [[Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names]] (US-ACAN) to be consistent with the names of nearby Edward VIII Bay and [[Ice Shelf]].

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Mount Edward[edit]

'''Mount Edward''' ({{coor dm|75|12|S|69|33|W|}}) is a prominent rock [[mountain]] (1,635 m) located centrally along the south margin of the [[Sweeney Mountains]], in eastern [[Ellsworth Land]]. Discovered by the [[Ronne Antarctic Research Expedition]] (RARE), 1947-48, under Ronne, who named this summit for Commander [[Edward C. Sweeney]], [[U.S. Navy Reserve]], a contributor to the expedition.

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[[Category:Mountains of Antarctica|Edward, Mount]]

Edwards Gap[edit]

'''Edwards Gap''' ({{coor dm|71|15|S|70|20|W|}}) is a pass at about 500 m through the [[Walton Mountains]], southward of [[Mount McArthur]], on [[Alexander Island]]. Named by [[United Kingdom Antarctic Place-Names Committee]] (UK-APC) for [[Christopher W. Edwards]], [[British Antarctic Survey]] (BAS) geologist at [[Stonington Island]], 1973-75, who mapped this area.

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Edwards Glacier[edit]

'''Edwards Glacier''' ({{coor dm|71|35|S|160|30|E|}}) is a [[glacier]] draining the east slopes of [[Daniels Range]] between [[Thompson Spur]] and [[Schroeder Spur]], in the [[Usarp Mountains]]. Mapped by [[United States Geological Survey]] (USGS) from surveys and [[U.S. Navy]] air photos, 1960-63. Named by [[Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names]] (US-ACAN) for [[Lloyd N. Edwards]], [[United States Antarctic Research Program]] (USARP) geologist at [[McMurdo Station]], 1967-68.

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[[Category:Glaciers of Antarctica]]

Edwards Island[edit]

'''Edwards Island''', now correctly renamed '''Wynne-Edwards Island'''({{coor dm|65|35|S|64|19|W|}}) is the second largest and innermost of the group of islands lying in the entrance to [[Leroux Bay]], off the west coast of [[Graham Land]]. Mapped from air photos and surveys by [[Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey]] (FIDS), 1955-57. Named by [[United Kingdom Antarctic Place-Names Committee]] (UK-APC) for Lieutenant [[Cecil J.C. Wynne-Edwards]], [[Royal Navy]], leader of a hydrographic survey unit in the area, 1956-57 and 1957-58.

== See also ==
* [[List of antarctic and sub-antarctic islands]]

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[[Category:Sub-antarctic islands]]

Edwards Islands[edit]

'''Edwards Islands''' ({{coor dm|66|51|S|50|29|E|}}) is a group of islands in the east side of [[Amundsen Bay]], about 2.5 nautical miles (4.6 km) southwest of [[Mount Oldfield]] in [[Enderby Land]]. Plotted from air photos taken from ANARE ([[Australian National Antarctic Research Expeditions]]) aircraft in 1956. Named by [[Antarctic Names Committee of Australia]] (ANCA) for [[T. Edwards]], assistant diesel mechanic at Wilkes station in 1960.

== See also ==
* [[List of antarctic and sub-antarctic islands]]

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[[Category:Islands of Antarctica]]

Edwards Islands (Canisteo Peninsula)[edit]

'''Edwards Islands''' ({{coor dm|73|53|S|103|8|W|}}) is a group of about 20 small islands, mostly ice free, lying off the southwest tip of [[Canisteo Peninsula]] in [[Amundsen Sea]]. Plotted from air photos taken by [[U.S. Navy Squadron VX]]-6 in January 1960. Named by [[Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names]] (US-ACAN) for "Z" "T" Edwards, chief quartermaster on the USS this area in February 1960.

== See also ==
* [[List of antarctic and sub-antarctic islands]]

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[[Category:Islands of Antarctica]]

Edwards Nunatak[edit]

'''Edwards Nunatak''' ({{coor dm|70|46|S|65|42|E|}}) is a [[nunatak]] with two small rock outliers, lying 2 nautical miles (3.7 km) southwest of [[Mount Kizaki]] in the [[Aramis Range]], [[Prince Charles Mountains]]. Plotted from ANARE ([[Australian National Antarctic Research Expeditions]]) air photos. Named by [[Antarctic Names Committee of Australia]] (ANCA) for [[D.R. Edwards]] radio technician at [[Mawson Station]] in 1969, who took part in the [[Prince Charles Mountains Survey]] in 1969.

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[[Category:Mountains of Antarctica]]

Edwards Peninsula[edit]

'''Edwards Peninsula''' ({{coor dm|72|0|S|97|40|W|}}) is an ice-covered [[peninsula]] about 20 nautical miles (37 km) long, between Murphy and [[Koether Inlets]] on the north side of [[Thurston Island]]. Delineated from aerial photographs made by [[U.S. Navy Operation Highjump]] in December 1946 and by [[U.S. Navy Squadron VX]]-6 in January 1960. Named by [[Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names]] (US-ACAN) for Lieutenant [[Donald L. Edwards]], navigator of USS [[Burton Island]] on the [[U.S. Navy Bellingshausen Sea Expedition]] to this area in February 1960.

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica]]

Edwards Pillar[edit]

'''Edwards Pillar''' ({{coor dm|73|5|S|66|20|E|}}) is a large rock pillar on the western face of [[Mount Stinear]], [[Prince Charles Mountains]]. The feature is in the vicinity of a geodetic survey station established by the ANARE ([[Australian National Antarctic Research Expeditions]]) Prince Charles Mountains survey party in 1971. Named for [[N.F. Edwards]], a surveyor with the party.

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Edwards Point[edit]

'''Edwards Point''' ({{coor dm|62|29|S|59|30|W|}}) is a point which marks the south extremity of [[Robert Island]], in the [[South Shetland Islands]]. Charted in 1935 by DI personnel on the 1948 Admiralty chart based upon this survey.

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Edwards Spur[edit]

'''Edwards Spur''' ({{coor dm|75|59|S|135|18|W|}}) is a spur with a small rock exposure along its crest, located on the lower northwest slopes of [[Mount Moulton]] in [[Marie Byrd Land]]. Mapped by [[United States Geological Survey]] (USGS) from surveys and [[U.S. Navy]] air photos, 1959-65. Named by [[Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names]] (US-ACAN) for [[Alvah G. Edwards]], CD1, U.S. Navy, [[Construction Driver]] with the [[Army-Navy Trail Party]] that traversed eastward from [[Little America V]] to establish [[Byrd Station]] in 1956.

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica]]

Mount Edwards[edit]

'''Mount Edwards''' ({{coor dm|76|51|S|144|7|W|}}) is a [[mountain]] 5 nautical miles (9 km) east-southeast of [[Morris Peak]] in the [[Denfeld Mountains]] of the [[Ford Ranges]], [[Marie Byrd Land]]. Mapped by the [[United States Antarctic Service]] (USAS) (1939-41) led by [[R. Admiral R.E. Byrd]]. Named for [[Leroy P. Edwards]] who acted as financial advisor to [[Admiral Byrd]] with regard to funds for the early Byrd expeditions.

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[[Category:Mountains of Antarctica|Edwards, Mount]]

Mount Egbert[edit]

'''Mount Egbert''' ({{coor dm|69|57|S|69|37|W|}}) is a mainly ice-covered [[mountain]], 2,895 m, 8 nautical miles (15 km) south-southeast of [[Mount Stephenson]] in the [[Douglas Range]] of [[Alexander Island]]. Possibly first seen in 1909 by the [[French Antarctic Expedition]] under Charcot, but not recognized as a part of Alexander Island. Surveyed in 1936 by the [[British Graham Land Expedition]] (BGLE) under Rymill. Resurveyed in 1948 by the [[Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey]] (FIDS), who named the mountain for Egbert, Saxon king of England, 802-839.

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[[Category:Mountains of Antarctica|Egbert, Mount]]

Mount Ege[edit]

'''Mount Ege''' ({{coor dm|83|34|S|55|53|W|}}) is a [[mountain]], 1,350 m, between Berquist and [[Drury Ridges]] in the [[Neptune Range]], [[Pensacola Mountains]]. Mapped by [[United States Geological Survey]] (USGS) from surveys and [[U.S. Navy]] air photos, 1956-66. Named by [[Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names]] (US-ACAN) for [[John R. Ege]], geologist with the Neptune Range field party, 1963-64.

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[[Category:Mountains of Antarctica|Ege, Mount]]

Egeberg Glacier[edit]

'''Egeberg Glacier''' ({{coor dm|71|34|S|169|50|E|}}) is a small [[glacier]] between [[Scott Keltie Glacier]] and [[Dugdale Glacier]], flowing into the west side of [[Robertson Bay]], [[Victoria Land]]. First charted by the [[British Antarctic Expedition]], 1898-1900, under [[C.E. Borchgrevink]], who named it for [[Consul Westye Egeberg]] of Christiania (now Oslo), Norway.

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[[Category:Glaciers of Antarctica]]

Mount Egerton[edit]

'''Mount Egerton''' ({{coor dm|80|50|S|157|55|E|}}) is a [[mountain]], 2,830 m, rising 3 nautical miles (6 km) north-northwest of [[Mount Field]] in the [[Churchill Mountains]]. Discovered by the ''Discovery'' expedition (1901-04) and named for [[Admiral Sir George Le Clerc Egerton]], a member of the [[Arctic Expedition]] of 1875-76, one of Scott's advisors for this expedition.

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[[Category:Mountains of Antarctica|Egerton, Mount]]

Egg Island[edit]

'''Egg Island''' ({{coor dm|63|41|S|57|42|W|}}) is a circular [[island]] 1.5 nautical miles (2.8 km) in diameter and 310 m high, lying 1 nautical mile (1.9 km) west of [[Tail Island]] in the northeast part of [[Prince Gustav Channel]]. Probably first seen by a party under [[J. Gunnar Andersson]] of the [[Swedish Antarctic Expedition]], 1901-04. It was charted in 1945 by the [[Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey]] (FIDS), who so named it because of its relative position to Tail, Eagle and [[Beak Islands]].

== See also ==
* [[List of antarctic and sub-antarctic islands]]

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[[Category:Sub-antarctic islands]]

Lake Eggers[edit]

'''Lake Eggers''' ({{coor dm|78|6|S|165|25|E|}}) is an ice-covered [[lake]], 0.5 nautical miles (0.9 km) long, located just east of [[Rainbow Ridge]] in central [[Brown Peninsula]], [[Scott Coast]], [[Victoria Land]]. Named by [[Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names]] (US-ACAN) (1999) after [[Alan J. Eggers]], Department of Geology, [[Victoria University]] of Wellington, who, in December 1975 as a member of [[Victoria University of Wellington Antarctic Expedition]] (VUWAE), sampled the [[Scallop Hill Formation]] at the north end of Brown Peninsula.

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[[Category:Lakes of Antarctica|Eggers, Lake]]

Egil Peak[edit]

'''Egil Peak''' ({{coor dm|72|24|S|1|18|E|}}) is a [[peak]], 2,640 m, at the east side of [[Isingen Mountain]], in the [[Sverdrup Mountains]], [[Queen Maud Land]]. Photographed from the air by the [[German Antarctic Expedition]] (1938-39). Mapped by Norwegian cartographers from surveys and air photos by [[Norwegian-British-Swedish Antarctic Expedition]] (NBSAE) (1949-52) and air photos by the Norwegian expedition (1958-59). Named for [[Egil Rogstad]], chief radio operator with the NBSAE.

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[[Category:Mountains of Antarctica]]

Egress Peak[edit]

'''Egress Peak''' ({{coor dm|81|24|S|158|54|E|}}) is a [[peak]] rising to 1690 m 6 nautical miles (11 km) east of [[Mount Albert Markham]], [[Churchill Mountains]]. Situated at the west extremity of [[Carlstrom Foothills]], the peak overlooks a 1400-m ice divide. [[Benbrook Glacier]] flows south from the divide into [[Flynn Glacier]]; an unnamed [[glacier]] flows north from the divide into [[Jorda Glacier]]. So named by [[Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names]] (US-ACAN) because of the emergence of the two glaciers adjacent to this peak.

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[[Category:Mountains of Antarctica]]

Ehlers Knob[edit]

'''Ehlers Knob''' ({{coor dm|72|35|S|95|9|W|}}) is a small but conspicuous ice-covered knob which surmounts the west part of the north coast of [[Dustin Island]]. The knob was photographed from helicopters of the [[Burton Island]] and February 1960. It was visited and surveyed by a party from the Ehlers, field assistant at [[Byrd Station]], 1966-67.

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica]]

Mount Ehrenspeck[edit]

'''Mount Ehrenspeck''' ({{coor dm|84|46|S|175|35|W|}}) is an one of the [[Cathedral Peaks]], a group of summits that form a portion of the wall on the east side of [[Shackleton Glacier]], in the [[Queen Maud Mountains]]. This [[peak]] (2,090 m) stands 2 nautical miles (3.7 km) southwest of [[Mount Kenney]]. Named by [[Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names]] (US-ACAN) for [[Helmut Ehrenspeck]], geologist with the [[Ohio State University Party]] of 1970-71 which geologically mapped this vicinity.

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[[Category:Mountains of Antarctica|Ehrenspeck, Mount]]

Eichorst Island[edit]

'''Eichorst Island''' ({{coor dm|64|47|S|64|4|W|}}) is a small [[island]] whose west end is deeply cleft into three parts, giving the appearance of three separate rocks at high tide, lying between [[Shortcut Island]] and [[Surge Rocks]] off the southwest coast of [[Anvers Island]]. Named by [[Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names]] (US-ACAN) for Marvin H. (Ike) Eichorst of Glenview, IL, licensed operator of amateur radio station W9RUK who handled radio traffic between points in the [[United States]] and [[Palmer Station]] during the period 1964-72.

== See also ==
* [[List of antarctic and sub-antarctic islands]]

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[[Category:Sub-antarctic islands]]

Eidsgavlen Cliff[edit]

'''Eidsgavlen Cliff''' ({{coor dm|71|41|S|11|42|E|}}) is a cliff 1 nautical mile (1.9 km) south of [[Eidshaugane Peaks]] in the [[Humboldt Mountains]] of [[Queen Maud Land]]. Discovered and photographed by the [[German Antarctic Expedition]], 1938-39. Mapped from air photos and surveys by [[Norwegian Antarctic Expedition]], 1956-60, and named Eidsgavlen (the isthmus gable).

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Eidshaugane Peaks[edit]

'''Eidshaugane Peaks''' ({{coor dm|71|40|S|11|46|E|}}) is a group of peaks 1 nautical mile (1.9 km) north of [[Eidsgavlen Cliff]] in the [[Humboldt Mountains]] of [[Queen Maud Land]]. Discovered and photographed by the [[German Antarctic Expedition]], 1938-39. Mapped from air photos and surveys by [[Norwegian Antarctic Expedition]], 1956-60, and named Eidshaugane (the isthmus hills).

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Eielson Peninsula[edit]

'''Eielson Peninsula''' ({{coor dm|70|35|S|61|45|W|}}) is a rugged, mainly snow-covered [[peninsula]], 20 nautical miles (37 km) long in an east-west direction and averaging 10 nautical miles (18 km) wide, lying between [[Smith Inlet]] and [[Lehrke Inlet]] on the east coast of [[Palmer Land]]. The rocky north wall of this peninsula is probably the feature which, on his flight of [[December 20]], [[1928]], [[Sir Hubert Wilkins]] sighted and named "[[Cape Eielson]]" from a position above [[Stefansson Strait]] (Wilkins gave the name to the farthest south rock outcrop seen from this position). This rock wall is conspicuous in the aerial photographs of the peninsula taken by members of the [[United States Antarctic Service]] (USAS) in 1940 from an aerial position at the north side of Stefansson Strait. The peninsula is named for [[Carl B. Eielson]], pilot on Wilkins' flight of 1928.

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica]]

Eights Coast[edit]

'''Eights Coast''' ({{coor dm|73|30|S|96|0|W|}}) is that portion of the coast of Antarctica between [[Cape Waite]] and [[Phrogner Point]]. This coast is bordered by [[Thurston Island]], [[Abbot Ice Shelf]] and some islands within the [[ice shelf]]. It was sighted by members of the [[United States Antarctic Service]] (USAS) in flights from the ship from surveys and [[U.S. Navy]] air photos, 1960-66. Named by US-SCAN for [[James Eights]] of Albany, NY, geologist on the Annawan in 1830, who carried on geologic investigations in the [[South Shetland Islands]], and who cruised westward on the Annawan, in company with the Penguin, to 103�W. Eights, the earliest American scientist in the Antarctic, discovered the first known fossils in the Antarctic region, a tree section, in the South Shetland Islands. As a result of these investigations Eights, in 1833, published in the Transactions of the [[Albany Institute]] (Vol. 2) what proved to be remarkably accurate observations and conclusions on the natural phenomena of the region.

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Eijkman Point[edit]

'''Eijkman Point''' ({{coor dm|65|37|S|64|10|W|}}) is the extremity of a rocky spur projecting into [[Leroux Bay]] from the west coast of [[Graham Land]], 4 nautical miles (7 km) south-southeast of [[Nunez Point]]. First mapped by the [[British Graham Land Expedition]] (BGLE) under Rymill 1934-37. Named by the [[United Kingdom Antarctic Place-Names Committee]] (UK-APC) in 1959 for [[Christiaan Eijkman]] (1858-1930), Dutch biologist, who in 1890-97 first produced experimental beriberi and initiated work on its prevention.

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Eilefsen Peak[edit]

'''Eilefsen Peak''' ({{coor dm|76|52|S|146|25|W|}}) is a [[peak]] in the northeast part of [[Radford Island]], lying in [[Sulzberger Ice Shelf]] off the coast of [[Marie Byrd Land]]. The peak was probably seen on an aerial flight by the [[Byrd Antarctic Expedition]] (1928-30). Named by [[Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names]] (US-ACAN) for [[Albert Eilefsen]], driver with the Byrd Antarctic Expedition (1933-35).

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Eilers Peak[edit]

'''Eilers Peak''' ({{coor dm|80|4|S|159|28|E|}}) is a prominent [[peak]] (c.1500 m) located 2.5 nautical miles (4.6 km) north-northwest of [[Rand Peak]] in central [[Nebraska Peaks]]. Named by [[Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names]] (US-ACAN) after [[D.H. Eilers]] of the [[Ross Ice Shelf Management Office]], University of Nebraska, Lincoln, a member of the [[United States Antarctic Research Program]] (USARP) glaciological party during RISP, 1974-75 field season.

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Eillium Island[edit]

'''Eillium Island''' ({{coor dm|60|42|S|44|51|W|}}) is a small [[island]] 1.2 nautical miles (2.2 km) northwest of [[Route Point]], the northwest tip of [[Laurie Island]] in the [[South Orkney Islands]]. It was first seen and roughly charted by Captain [[George Powell]] and Captain [[Nathaniel Palmer]] during their joint cruise in 1821. Recharted in 1903 by the [[Scottish National Antarctic Expedition]] under Dr. [[William S. Bruce]], who named it for his son Eillium.

== See also ==
* [[List of antarctic and sub-antarctic islands]]

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[[Category:Sub-antarctic islands]]

Einstoding Islands[edit]

'''Einstoding Islands''' ({{coor dm|67|28|S|61|41|E|}}) is a group of three small islands, 2 nautical miles (3.7 km) north of the [[Stanton Group]] off the coast of Mac. [[Robertson Land]]. Mapped by Norwegian cartographers from air photos taken by the [[Lars Christensen Expedition]], 1936-37, and named Einstodingane.

== See also ==
* [[List of antarctic and sub-antarctic islands]]

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[[Category:Islands of Antarctica]]

Einstodingen Island[edit]

'''Einstodingen Island''' ({{coor dm|69|39|S|38|50|E|}}) is a lone [[island]] lying 10 nautical miles (18 km) east of [[Padda Island]] in southern [[Lutzow-Holm Bay]]. Mapped by Norwegian cartographers from air photos taken by the [[Lars Christensen Expedition]], 1936-37, and named Einstodingen (the hermit) because of its isolated position.

== See also ==
* [[List of antarctic and sub-antarctic islands]]

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[[Category:Islands of Antarctica]]

Einthoven Hill[edit]

'''Einthoven Hill''' ({{coor dm|64|14|S|62|9|W|}}) is a hill 3 nautical miles (6 km) southwest of [[Mitchell Point]] on the east side of [[Brabant Island]], in the [[Palmer Archipelago]]. Photographed by [[Hunting Aerosurveys Ltd]]. in 1956-57, and mapped from these photos in 1959. Named by the [[United Kingdom Antarctic Place-Names Committee]] (UK-APC) for [[Willem Einthoven]] (1860-1927), Dutch inventor of the electrocardiograph.

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Eisberg Head[edit]

'''Eisberg Head''' ({{coor dm|75|12|S|110|27|W|}}) is a [[headland]] consisting of steep cliffs marked by rocky exposures, located just west of the mouth of [[Vane Glacier]] on the coast of [[Marie Byrd Land]]. The headland is the north extremity of a mountainous ridge descending from the central part of the [[Mount Murphy]] massif Mapped by [[United States Geological Survey]] (USGS) from surveys and [[U.S. Navy]] air photos, 1959-66. Named by [[Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names]] (US-ACAN) for Commander (later Capt.) [[Harry B. Eisberg]], U.S. Navy, [[Staff Medical Officer]] on [[Operation Highjump]], 1946-47.

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Eisenhower Range[edit]

'''Eisenhower Range''' ({{coor dm|74|15|S|162|15|E|}}) is a majestic [[mountain]] range, about 45 nautical miles (80 km) long and rising to 3,070 m, which rises between [[Reeves Neve]] on the west, [[Reeves Glacier]] on the south, and [[Priestley Glacier]] on the north and east, in [[Victoria Land]]. The range is flat topped and descends gradually to Reeves Neve, but is steep cliffed and marked by sharp spurs along the Priestley Glacier. The range was probably observed by most early expeditions due to its prominence as viewed from the [[Ross Sea]]. It was mapped in detail by [[United States Geological Survey]] (USGS) from surveys and [[U.S. Navy]] air photos, 1955-63. Named by [[Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names]] (US-ACAN) for [[Dwight D. Eisenhower]], who was President of the [[United States]] in 1954, at the time when the U.S. Navy's [[Operation Deep Freeze]] expeditions to Antarctica were initiated.

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[[Category:Mountain ranges of Antarctica]]

Eisner Peak[edit]

'''Eisner Peak''' ({{coor dm|68|50|S|65|45|W|}}) is a [[peak]] rising to 1,525 m at the west side of the terminus of [[Sumner Glacier]], 2 nautical miles (3.7 km) south-southeast of [[Mount Blunt]], on the east coast of [[Antarctic Peninsula]]. The peak was photographed from the air by the [[Ronne Antarctic Research Expedition]] (RARE), 1947, and [[U.S. Navy]], 1966, and was surveyed from the ground by [[Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey]] (FIDS), 1960-61. Named in 1977 by [[Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names]] (US-ACAN) for [[Glen Eisner]], [[United States Antarctic Research Program]] (USARP) biologist, [[Palmer Station]], 1975.

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[[Category:Mountains of Antarctica]]

Mount Eissinger[edit]

'''Mount Eissinger''' ({{coor dm|70|2|S|67|44|W|}}) is a large ridge-like [[mountain]] at the north side of [[Riley Glacier]] on the west side of [[Palmer Land]]. The feature has a snow-topped upper surface, bare rock cliffs along the north side, and an impressive rectangular rock buttress rises in an unbroken, near-vertical sweep from the [[glacier]] to 500 m at the west end. Mapped by the [[United States Geological Survey]] (USGS) in 1974. Named by [[Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names]] (US-ACAN) for [[Karlheinz Eissinger]], USGS topographic engineer with the [[Ellsworth Land Survey]] party, 1968-69.

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[[Category:Mountains of Antarctica|Eissinger, Mount]]

Ekblad Glacier[edit]

'''Ekblad Glacier''' ({{coor dm|83|4|S|167|17|E|}}) is a [[glacier]], 8 nautical miles (15 km) long, flowing from the east slopes of the [[Holland Range]] into [[Wise Bay]], [[Ross Ice Shelf]]. Named by [[Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names]] (US-ACAN) for [[A. Ekblad]], Master of the USNS Wyandot during [[U.S. Navy Operation Deepfreeze]], 1964 and 1965.

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Mount Ekblaw[edit]

'''Mount Ekblaw''' ({{coor dm|77|19|S|141|48|W|}}) is a [[mountain]], 1,235 m, standing 3 nautical miles (6 km) east of [[Mount Van Valkenburg]] in the east part of the [[Clark Mountains]] in [[Marie Byrd Land]]. Discovered on aerial flights from the [[West Base]] of the [[United States Antarctic Service]] (USAS) in 1940 and named for [[W.E. Ekblaw]], professor of geography at [[Clark University]] and a member of the [[Crocker Land Expedition]] in the Arctic (1913-17).

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[[Category:Mountains of Antarctica|Ekblaw, Mount]]

Ekelof Point[edit]

'''Ekelof Point''' ({{coor dm|64|14|S|57|12|W|}}) is a high rocky point which lies 5 nautical miles (9 km) southwest of [[Cape Gage]] and marks the north side of the entrance to [[Markham Bay]] on the east side of [[James Ross Island]]. First seen and surveyed by the [[Swedish Antarctic Expedition]] under Nordenskjold, 1901-04, who named it [[Kap Ekelof]] after Dr. [[Eric Ekelof]], medical officer of the expedition. Resurveyed by [[Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey]] (FIDS) in 1953. Point is considered a more suitable descriptive term for this feature than cape.

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Ekesteinen Rock[edit]

'''Ekesteinen Rock''' ({{coor dm|71|46|S|10|46|E|}}) is an isolated rock 3.5 nautical miles (6 km) southeast of [[Smirnov Peak]], [[Shcherbakov Range]], at the east end of the [[Orvin Mountains]], [[Queen Maud Land]]. Mapped from air photos and surveys by [[Norwegian Antarctic Expedition]], 1956-60, and named Ekesteinen (the spoke stone).

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Ekho Mountain[edit]

'''Ekho Mountain''' ({{coor dm|71|28|S|15|26|E|}}) is a [[mountain]], 1,690 m, standing 3 nautical miles (6 km) southwest of [[Vorposten Peak]] in the [[Lomonosov Mountains]], [[Queen Maud Land]]. Discovered and roughly plotted from air photos by [[German Antarctic Expedition]], 1938-39. Mapped from air photos and surveys by [[Norwegian Antarctic Expedition]], 1958-59; remapped by [[Soviet Antarctic Expedition]], 1960-61, and named [[Gora Ekho]] ([[Echo Mountain]]).

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Eklund Islands[edit]

'''Eklund Islands''' ({{coor dm|73|16|S|71|50|W|}}) is a group of islands which rise through the ice near the southwest end of [[George VI Sound]]. The largest [[island]], 5 nautical miles (9 km) in extent and rising to 410 m, was discovered in December 1940 by [[Finn Ronne]] and [[Carl R. Eklund]] of the [[United States Antarctic Service]] (USAS) during their 1,097-mile sledge journey south from [[Stonington Island]] to the southwest part of George VI Sound and return. At that time this large island, named by Ronne for Eklund, ornithologist and assistant biologist of the expedition was the only land protruding above an area of hummocky ice. [[V.E. Fuchs]] and [[R.J. Adie]] of the [[Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey]] (FIDS) sledged to the southwest part of George VI Sound in 1949, at which time, because of a recession of the ice in the [[sound]], they were able to determine that the island discovered by Ronne and Eklund is the largest of a group of mainly ice-covered islands. On the basis of original discovery, the [[Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names]] (US-ACAN) recommends that the name Eklund be applied to the island group rather than the single island discovered by Ronne and Eklund.

== See also ==
* [[List of antarctic and sub-antarctic islands]]

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Ekspress Nunatak[edit]

'''Ekspress Nunatak''' ({{coor dm|71|48|S|2|53|E|}}) is an isolated [[nunatak]] 10 nautical miles (18 km) north of [[Stabben Mountain]] in [[Queen Maud Land]]. Mapped by [[Norsk Polarinstitutt]] from air photography of 1951-52 and 1958-59. Also mapped by [[Soviet Antarctic Expedition]] in 1961 and named [[Gora Ekspress]] (express hill).

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Ekstrom Ice Shelf[edit]

'''Ekstrom Ice Shelf''' ({{coor dm|71|0|S|8|0|W|}}) is the [[ice shelf]] lying between [[Sorasen Ridge]] and [[Halvfarryggen Ridge]], on the coast of [[Queen Maud Land]]. First mapped by [[Norwegian-British-Swedish Antarctic Expedition]] (NBSAE), 1949-52. Named for [[Bertil Ekstrom]], Swedish mechanical engineer with NBSAE, who drowned when the weasel (track-driven vehicle) he was driving plunged over the edge of [[Quar Ice Shelf]], [[February 24]], [[1951]].

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El Pulgar[edit]

'''El Pulgar''' ({{coor dm|71|29|S|161|46|E|}}) is a precipitous granite monolith (1,660 m) standing 3 nautical miles (6 km) north of [[Berg Peak]] in northern [[Morozumi Range]]. The feature was climbed by four members of [[New Zealand Geological Survey Antarctic Expedition]] (NZGSAE), 1967-68, who gave the name El Pulgar (Spanish for "the thumb").

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El-Sayed Glacier[edit]

'''El-Sayed Glacier''' ({{coor dm|75|40|S|141|52|W|}}) is a [[glacier]] about 15 nautical miles (28 km) long which drains the northeast slopes of [[Zuncich Hill]] in [[Marie Byrd Land]]. It flows northeast to enter [[Land Glacier]] at the south side of [[Mount Shirley]]. Mapped by [[United States Geological Survey]] (USGS) from surveys and [[U.S. Navy]] air photos, 1959-65. Named by [[Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names]] (US-ACAN) for [[Sayed Z. El-Sayed]], [[United States Antarctic Research Program]] (USARP) oceanographer on the [[International Weddell Sea Oceanographic Expedition]], 1967-68 and 1969-70.

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Eland Mountains[edit]

'''Eland Mountains''' ({{coor dm|70|35|S|63|10|W|}}) is a range of mountains which rise above 2,440 m and extend about 20 nautical miles (37 km) in a NE-SW direction along the south side of [[Clifford Glacier]], on the east coast of [[Palmer Land]]. The mountains were discovered in 1936 by the [[British Graham Land Expedition]] (BGLE), and they appear in aerial photographs taken by the [[United States Antarctic Service]] (USAS) in September 1940. During 1947 they were photographed from the air by members of the [[Ronne Antarctic Research Expedition]] (RARE), who in conjunction with the [[Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey]] (FIDS) charted them from the ground. The name Eland, [[Lady Clifford]]'s maiden name, was given in 1952 by [[Sir Miles Clifford]], Gov. of the [[Falkland Islands]], at the request of members of the FIDS staff.

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[[Category:Mountain ranges of Antarctica]]

Elbow Peak[edit]

'''Elbow Peak''' ({{coor dm|83|32|S|56|37|W|}}) is a [[peak]], 1,195 m, located at the southernmost bend of [[Berquist Ridge]] in the [[Neptune Range]], [[Pensacola Mountains]]. Mapped by [[United States Geological Survey]] (USGS) from surveys and [[U.S. Navy]] air photos, 1956-66. The name given by [[Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names]] (US-ACAN) describes the peak's position along the ridge.

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[[Category:Mountains of Antarctica]]

Eld Peak[edit]

'''Eld Peak''' ({{coor dm|69|20|S|157|12|E|}}) is a prominent [[peak]] (800 m) rising 6 nautical miles (11 km) southeast of [[Reynolds Peak]] on the west side of [[Matusevich Glacier]]. Two conical peaks were sighted in the area from the Peacock on [[January 16]], [[1840]] by [[Passed Midshipmen Henry Eld]] and [[William Reynolds]] of the [[United States Exploring Expedition]] (1838 42). The southeastern peak was named for Eld by USEE leader Lieutenant [[Charles Wilkes]]. In 1959 [[Phillip Law]] of ANARE ([[Australian National Antarctic Research Expeditions]]) made investigations of features in this area. Reference to Wilkes' narrative showed that the recorded descriptions of the peaks sighted by Eld and Reynolds to be in accord with photographs of the peaks on the west side of Matusevich Glacier. The peak described was selected by Law to commemorate Wilkes' naming.

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Elder Bluff[edit]

'''Elder Bluff''' ({{coor dm|70|31|S|61|44|W|}}) is a prominent and mostly bare rock bluff that forms a portion of the north side of [[Eielson Peninsula]] and overlooks [[Smith Inlet]], on the east coast of [[Palmer Land]]. Named by [[Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names]] (US-ACAN) for [[Robert B. Elder]], Chief of the [[U.S. Coast Guard Oceanographic Unit]] on the first [[International Weddell Sea Oceanographic Expedition]] on board USCGC Glacier in 1968.

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Elder Glacier[edit]

'''Elder Glacier''' ({{coor dm|72|35|S|168|46|E|}}) is a tributary [[glacier]] entering the [[Tucker Glacier]] just west of [[Oread Spur]], in the [[Victory Mountains]], [[Victoria Land]]. Mapped by [[United States Geological Survey]] (USGS) from surveys and [[U.S. Navy]] air photos, 1960-62. Named by [[Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names]] (US-ACAN) for [[William C. Elder]], topographic engineer, a member of the USGS [[Topo North-South]] party that surveyed the area, 1961-62.

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Elder Peak[edit]

'''Elder Peak''' ({{coor dm|81|7|S|157|20|E|}}) is a [[peak]] at the north margin of [[Chapman Snowfield]] in the [[Churchill Mountains]]. The peak rises to 2360 m 6 nautical miles (11 km) southwest of [[Mount Wharton]]. Named after [[William C. Elder]], [[United States Geological Survey]] (USGS) topographic engineer with the [[Topo North-Topo South]] survey expedition in these mountains, 1961-62.

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Mount Elder[edit]

'''Mount Elder''' ({{coor dm|61|13|S|55|12|W|}}) is a [[mountain]] between [[Endurance Glacier]] and [[Mount Pendragon]] in [[Elephant Island]], [[South Shetland Islands]]. Named by [[United Kingdom Antarctic Place-Names Committee]] (UK-APC) for Captain [[John P. Elder]], RE, surveyor of the U.K. joint [[Services Expedition]] to Elephant Island, 1970-71.

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[[Category:Mountains of Antarctica|Elder, Mount]]

Eldred Glacier[edit]

'''Eldred Glacier''' ({{coor dm|61|58|S|58|16|W|}}) is a [[glacier]] 2.5 nautical miles (4.6 km) long, flowing to the north coast of [[King George Island]] immediately east of [[Potts Peak]], in the [[South Shetland Islands]]. Named by the [[United Kingdom Antarctic Place-Names Committee]] (UK-APC) in 1960 for [[Andrew J. Eldred]], Master of the sealing vessel [[Thomas Hunt]] from Stonington, CT, who visited the South Shetland Islands in 1873-74, 1875-76, 1878-79 and 1879-80. During the latter season he took part in the unsuccessful search for the [[Charles Shearer]].

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Eldred Point[edit]

'''Eldred Point''' ({{coor dm|75|30|S|141|58|W|}}) is an ice-covered point which marks the west side of the terminus of [[Land Glacier]] on the coast of [[Marie Byrd Land]]. Mapped by [[United States Geological Survey]] (USGS) from surveys and [[U.S. Navy]] aerial photographs, 1959-65. Named by [[Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names]] (US-ACAN) for [[David T. Eldred]], a member of the U.S. Navy winter-over support unit at [[McMurdo Station]] in 1958, 1965 and 1969.

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Eldridge Bluff[edit]

'''Eldridge Bluff''' ({{coor dm|73|27|S|164|48|E|}}) is a prominent rock bluff 5 nautical miles (9 km) long, comprising that part of the west wall of [[Aviator Glacier]] immediately south of [[Cosmonaut Glacier]], in [[Victoria Land]]. Mapped by [[United States Geological Survey]] (USGS) from surveys and [[U.S. Navy]] air photos, 1960-64. Named by [[Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names]] (US-ACAN) for Lieutenant Commander [[David B. Eldridge]], Jr., U.S. Navy, officer in charge of the winter detachment of [[Squadron VX]]-6 at [[McMurdo Station]], 1967.

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Eldridge Peak[edit]

'''Eldridge Peak''' ({{coor dm|84|51|S|116|50|W|}}) is a small, mainly ice-free [[peak]], or [[nunatak]], marking the west extremity of the [[Ohio Range]]. Surveyed by the [[United States Antarctic Research Program]] (USARP) [[Horlick Mountains Traverse]] party in December 1958. Named by [[Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names]] (US-ACAN) for [[Henry M. Eldridge]], Antarctic cartographer, Branch of [[Special Maps]], [[U.S. Geological Survey]].

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[[Category:Mountains of Antarctica]]

Mount Electra[edit]

'''Mount Electra''' ({{coor dm|77|30|S|160|52|E|}}) is a prominent [[peak]], over 2,000 m, immediately west of [[Mount Dido]] in the [[Olympus Range]] of [[Victoria Land]]. Named by the [[Victoria University of Wellington Antarctic Expedition]] (VUWAE) (1958-59) for a figure in Greek mythology.

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[[Category:Mountains of Antarctica|Electra, Mount]]

Elephant Cove[edit]

'''Elephant Cove''' ({{coor dm|54|9|S|37|41|W|}}) is a small circular [[cove]] lying 0.5 nautical miles (0.9 km) north of [[Klutschak Point]] along the south coast and near the west end of [[South Georgia]]. The name [[Elephant Bay]], probably applied by early sealers at South Georgia, was recorded on the chart of the German expedition under [[Kohl-Larsen]], 1928-29, and the chart by DI personnel who mapped South Georgia in this period. Cove is considered a better descriptive term for the feature.

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica]]

Elephant Flats[edit]

'''Elephant Flats''' ({{coor dm|60|42|S|45|37|W|}}) is a mud flat along the shore between [[Cemetery Bay]] and [[Marble Knolls]] on the east side of [[Signy Island]]. Named by [[United Kingdom Antarctic Place-Names Committee]] (UK-APC) after the elephant seals that frequent the flat.

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Elephant Island[edit]

'''Elephant Island''' ({{coor dm|61|10|S|55|14|W|}}) is an [[island]] 24 nautical miles (44 km) long and 12 nautical miles (22 km) wide in its widest part, lying in the east part of the [[South Shetland Islands]]. The name dates back to at least 1821 and is now established in international usage.

== See also ==
* [[List of antarctic and sub-antarctic islands]]

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[[Category:Sub-antarctic islands]]

Elephant Lagoon[edit]

'''Elephant Lagoon''' ({{coor dm|54|4|S|37|8|W|}}) is a lagoon, 0.3 nautical miles (0.6 km) long, situated close south of [[Cook Bay]] to which it is connected by [[Carl Passage]], on the north coast of [[South Georgia]]. Probably named by DI personnel who charted the area during the period 1926-30.

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Elephant Moraine[edit]

'''Elephant Moraine''' ({{coor dm|76|17|S|157|20|E|}}) is an isolated moraine, 3 nautical miles (6 km) long, located 27 nautical miles (50 km) west of [[Reckling Peak]], to the west of the head of [[Mawson Glacier]] in [[Victoria Land]]. The moraine, described in some reports as an ice core moraine, is situated along a long, narrow patch of bare ice that extends west from Reckling Peak for 60 miles. The feature was noted in U.S. satellite imagery of 1973, and in aerial photographs obtained subsequently, by [[William R. MacDonald]] of [[United States Geological Survey]] (USGS), who originally described it to [[William A. Cassidy]] as "a possible [[nunatak]] having an outline similar to an elephant." [[Several United States Antarctic Research Program]] (USARP) field parties led by Cassidy successfully searched for meteorites at this moraine from the 1979-80 season. The descriptive name was approved by [[Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names]] (US-ACAN) in 1989.

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Elephant Point[edit]

'''Elephant Point''' ({{coor dm|62|41|S|60|52|W|}}) is a mainly ice-free promontory on which there is a square black rock, forming the southernmost point of the west half of [[Livingston Island]], in the [[South Shetland Islands]]. First charted and named by [[Robert Fildes]] in 1820-22. The name was incorrectly placed on the point between South and [[False Bays]] (now [[Miers Bluff]]) for many years.

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Elephant Ridge[edit]

'''Elephant Ridge''' ({{coor dm|71|20|S|68|19|W|}}) is a sharp curved ridge, orientated generally W-E, and extending for about 0.5 nautical miles (0.9 km), with the highest point at the center rising to 6999m. The north slopes are snow and ice free, and the central point is situated about 0.7 nautical miles (1.3 km) south-southeast of [[Khufu Peak]] and 0.9 nautical miles (1.7 km) southwest of [[Giza Peak]]. Uranus Glacier forms the south boundary of the feature. Elephant Ridge is referred to as [[Man Pack Hill]] in scientific reports in the early 1960s, and is locally known descriptively as [[The Elephant]]. The summit resembles an elephant's head, with the ridge forming the trunk.

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Elephant Rocks[edit]

'''Elephant Rocks''' ({{coor dm|64|46|S|64|5|W|}}) is a group of three prominent rocks connected by shoals, located between [[Torgersen Island]] and the northwest entrance to [[Arthur Harbor]], off the southwest coast of [[Anvers Island]]. The name became established locally among [[United States Antarctic Research Program]] (USARP) personnel at nearby [[Palmer Station]] in about 1971, as these rocks provide a favorite habitat for elephant seals.

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Elevation Point[edit]

'''Elevation Point''' ({{coor dm|77|48|S|161|39|E|}}) is a bold rock point which forms the west end of [[Kukri Hills]], overlooking [[Taylor Glacier]] in [[Victoria Land]]. The name is one of a group in the area associated with surveying applied by [[New Zealand Geographic Board]] (NZGB) in 1993.

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Eley Peak[edit]

'''Eley Peak''' ({{coor dm|79|39|S|84|20|W|}}) is a small rock [[peak]] in the north part of [[Soholt Peaks]], over-looking the head of [[Balish Glacier]] in the [[Heritage Range]], [[Ellsworth Mountains]]. Mapped by [[United States Geological Survey]] (USGS) from surveys and [[U.S. Navy]] air photos, 1961-66. Named by [[Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names]] (US-ACAN); for [[Richard G. Eley]], U.S. Navy, photographer on flights over [[Marie Byrd Land]] and [[Ellsworth Land]], 1965-66 and 1966-67.

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[[Category:Mountains of Antarctica]]

Elgar Uplands[edit]

'''Elgar Uplands''' ({{coor dm|69|39|S|70|43|W|}}) is an uplands rising to 1,900 m, between [[Tufts Pass]] to the north and [[Sullivan Glacier]] to the south, in the north part of [[Alexander Island]]. First photographed from the air and roughly mapped by the [[British Graham Land Expedition]] (BGLE) in 1937. Remapped from air photos taken by the [[Ronne Antarctic Research Expedition]] (RARE), 1947-48, by Searle of the [[Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey]] (FIDS) in 1960, and from [[U.S. Landsat]] imagery of February, 1975. Named by [[United Kingdom Antarctic Place-Names Committee]] (UK-APC) after [[Sir Edward Elgar]] (1857-1934), English composer.

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Eliason Glacier[edit]

'''Eliason Glacier''' ({{coor dm|64|15|S|59|25|W|}}) is a [[glacier]] 5 nautical miles (9 km) long close west of [[Mount Hornsby]], flowing south from [[Detroit Plateau]] into the ice piedmont north of [[Larsen Inlet]], [[Graham Land]]. Mapped from surveys by [[Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey]] (FIDS) (1960-61). Named by [[United Kingdom Antarctic Place-Names Committee]] (UK-APC) after the Eliason motor sledge, invented in 1942 in Sweden, now made in Canada, and used in [[Arctic Canada]] since 1950 and in the Antarctic since 1960.

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[[Category:Glaciers of Antarctica]]

Eliza Cone[edit]

'''Eliza Cone''' ({{coor dm|66|55|S|163|12|E|}}) is a rock with an archway through it standing 1 nautical mile (1.9 km) west of [[Cape McNab]] on the south end of [[Buckle Island]], in the [[Balleny Islands]]. Located adjacent to [[Scott Cone]], the two features appear to have been named after [[John Balleny]]'s schooner, the [[Eliza Scott]], in which he discovered the Balleny Islands in February 1839.

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Eliza Rocks[edit]

'''Eliza Rocks''' ({{coor dm|62|26|S|60|14|W|}}) is a group of rocks lying west of [[Zed Island]], in the [[South Shetland Islands]]. Named by the [[United Kingdom Antarctic Place-Names Committee]] (UK-APC) in 1958 after the sealer [[Desolation Island]], during part of the 1821-22 season.

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Mount Elizabeth[edit]

'''Mount Elizabeth''' ({{coor dm|83|54|S|168|23|E|}}) is a massive ice-free [[mountain]], 4,480 m, standing 6 nautical miles (11 km) south of [[Mount Anne]] in [[Queen Alexandra Range]]. Discovered by the [[British Antarctic Expedition]] (1907-09) and named for [[Elizabeth Dawson-Lambton]], a supporter of the expedition.

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[[Category:Mountains of Antarctica|Elizabeth, Mount]]

Elkhorn Ridge[edit]

'''Elkhorn Ridge''' ({{coor dm|76|40|S|161|3|E|}}) is a rugged ridge, 10 nautical miles (18 km) long, between Towle and [[Northwind Glaciers]] in the [[Convoy Range]] of [[Victoria Land]]. Mapped by [[United States Geological Survey]] (USGS) from ground surveys and Navy air photos. Named by [[Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names]] (US-ACAN) in 1964 for the USNS Elkhorn, a tanker in the American convoy into [[McMurdo Sound]], 1961-62.

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Ellefsen Harbor[edit]

'''Ellefsen Harbor''' ({{coor dm|60|44|S|45|3|W|}}) is a harbor lying at the south end of [[Powell Island]] between Christoffersen and [[Michelsen Islands]], in the [[South Orkney Islands]]. Discovered in the course of the joint cruise by Captain [[George Powell]], British sealer, and Captain [[Nathaniel Palmer]], American sealer, in December 1821. The name first appears on Powell's chart published in 1822.

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Ellen Glacier[edit]

'''Ellen Glacier''' ({{coor dm|78|13|S|84|30|W|}}) is a large [[glacier]] in central [[Sentinel Range]], [[Ellsworth Mountains]], draining the east slopes of [[Mount Anderson]] and [[Long Gables]] and flowing generally southeast for 22 nautical miles (41 km) to [[Barnes Ridge]], where it leaves the range and enters S.-flowing [[Rutford Ice Stream]]. First mapped by [[United States Geological Survey]] (USGS) from surveys and [[U.S. Navy]] air photos, 1957-59. Named by [[Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names]] (US-ACAN) for Lieutenant Colonel [[Cicero J. Ellen]], [[United States Air Force]] (USAF), who was in command of many of the air operations when the [[South Pole Station]] was established by air drop in the 1956-57 season.

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[[Category:Glaciers of Antarctica]]

Ellerbeck Peak[edit]

'''Ellerbeck Peak''' ({{coor dm|54|23|S|36|19|W|}}) is a [[peak]] rising to 685 m on the south side of [[Sorling Valley]], [[South Georgia]]. Named by the [[United Kingdom Antarctic Place-Names Committee]] (UK-APC) in 1987 for Lieutenant Commander [[John A. Ellerbeck]], [[Royal Navy]], pilot in command of the helicopter from HMS submarine [[Santa Fe]] during the retaking of Grytviken, [[April 25]], [[1982]].

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[[Category:Mountains of Antarctica]]

Mount Ellery[edit]

'''Mount Ellery''' ({{coor dm|69|53|S|159|38|E|}}) is a [[mountain]] (1,110 m) near the head of [[Suvorov Glacier]], 2 nautical miles (3.7 km) northwest of [[Hornblende Bluffs]], in the [[Wilson Hills]]. The region was photographed by [[U.S. Navy Operation Highjump]], 1946-47. The position of the mountain was fixed on [[February 21]], [[1962]] by [[Syd L. Kirkby]], surveyor with the ANARE ([[Australian National Antarctic Research Expeditions]]) [[Thala Dan]] cruise led by [[Phillip Law]]. Named for [[R.L.J. Ellery]], a member of the [[Austratian Antarctic Exploration Committee]] of 1886.

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[[Category:Mountains of Antarctica|Ellery, Mount]]

Elliot Peak[edit]

'''Elliot Peak''' ({{coor dm|84|31|S|164|4|E|}}) is the summit [[peak]] of a conspicuous northeast trending basalt ridge, rising 1 nautical mile (1.9 km) northwest of [[Tempest Peak]], in [[Queen Alexandra Range]]. Named by the [[Ohio State University]] party to the Queen Alexandra Range (1966-67) for [[David H. Elliot]], geologist with the party.

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Mount Elliot[edit]

'''Mount Elliot''' ({{coor dm|70|53|S|166|32|E|}}) is a [[mountain]] (1,500 m) rising between [[Kirkby Glacier]] and O'[[Hara Glacier]], about 5 nautical miles (9 km) south of [[Yule Bay]], in the [[Anare Mountains]], [[Victoria Land]]. A mountain in this approximate position was sighted by Captain [[James C. Ross]], [[Royal Navy]], in February 1841, who named it for [[R. Admiral George Elliot]], Commander-in-Chief in the Cape of [[Good Hope Station]].

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[[Category:Mountains of Antarctica|Elliot, Mount]]

Elliott Glacier[edit]

'''Elliott Glacier''' ({{coor dm|66|33|S|115|14|E|}}) is a small channel [[glacier]] that drains northward to [[Budd Coast]] midway between [[Cape Hammersly]] and [[Cape Waldron]]. Delineated from aerial photographs taken by [[U.S. Navy Operation Highjump]] (1946-47), and named by [[Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names]] (US-ACAN) after [[Samuel Elliott]], Midshipman on the sloop Wilkes.

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[[Category:Glaciers of Antarctica]]

Elliott Hills[edit]

'''Elliott Hills''' ({{coor dm|71|25|S|65|25|W|}}) is a group of low hills and [[nunatak]]s, 12 nautical miles (22 km) long, that mark the northwest end of the [[Gutenko Mountains]], in central [[Palmer Land]]. Mapped by [[United States Geological Survey]] (USGS) in 1974. Named by [[Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names]] (US-ACAN) for Lieutenant Commander [[David J. Elliott]], [[U.S. Navy]], Commander of LC-130 aircraft in aerial photographic and ice-sensing flights over extensive areas of the Antarctic continent during [[Operation Deep Freeze]], 1970 and 1971.

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Elliott Nunatak[edit]

'''Elliott Nunatak''' ({{coor dm|85|16|S|89|43|W|}}) is a large [[nunatak]] (2,165 m) jutting out from the center of [[Bermel Escarpment]], in the [[Thiel Mountains]]. The name was proposed by [[Peter Bermel]] and [[Arthur Ford]], co-leaders of the [[United States Geological Survey]] (USGS) Thiel Mountains party that surveyed these mountains in 1960-61. Named for [[Raymond L. Elliott]], geologist with the Thiel Mountains party.

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Elliott Passage[edit]

'''Elliott Passage''' ({{coor dm|67|44|S|68|28|W|}}) is a marine channel running NE-SW between the southeast coast of [[Adelaide Island]] and [[Jenny Island]]. Named by the [[United Kingdom Antarctic Place-Names Committee]] (UK-APC) in 1984 after Captain [[Christopher R. Elliott]], Master of RRS [[John Biscoe]] from 1975; he served in other officer positions on John Biscoe and RRS Bransfield from 1967.

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Elliott Ridge[edit]

'''Elliott Ridge''' ({{coor dm|83|57|S|57|0|W|}}) is a hook-shaped ridge, 8 nautical miles (15 km) long, extending westward from [[Wiens Peak]] in southern [[Neptune Range]], [[Pensacola Mountains]]. Mapped by [[United States Geological Survey]] (USGS) from surveys and [[U.S. Navy]] air photos, 1956-66. Named by [[Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names]] (US-ACAN) for Commander [[James Elliott]], captain of the icebreaker USS [[Staten Island]] which assisted the cargo ship Wyandot through the [[Weddell Sea]] pack ice to establish [[Ellsworth Station]] on the [[Filchner Ice Shelf]] in January 1957.

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Elliott Rock[edit]

'''Elliott Rock''' ({{coor dm|54|0|S|38|5|W|}}) is a rock lying in [[Stewart Strait]], close west of [[Bird Island]], off the west end of [[South Georgia]]. Positioned by DI personnel under Lieutenant Commander [[J.M. Chaplin]] in the period 1926-30. Named in 1957 by the [[United Kingdom Antarctic Place-Names Committee]] (UK-APC) for [[Henry W. Elliott]] (1846-1930), American naturalist; pioneer of fur seal studies in the [[North Pacific]] and life-long champion of fur seal protection. Fur seals breed on nearby Bird Island.

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Cape Elliott[edit]

'''Cape Elliott''' ({{coor dm|65|52|S|102|35|E|}}) is an ice-covered cape marking the north extremity of the [[Knox Coast]] of [[Wilkes Land]]. It fronts on [[Shackleton Ice Shelf]], 28 nautical miles (50 km) southwest of [[Bowman Island]]. Delineated from aerial photographs taken by [[U.S. Navy Operation Highjump]] (1946-47) and named by the [[Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names]] (US-ACAN) after [[J.L. Elliott]], chaplain on the sloop Vincennes of the [[United States Exploring Expedition]] (1838-42) under Wilkes.

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica|Elliott, Cape]]

Mount Elliott[edit]

'''Mount Elliott''' ({{coor dm|64|24|S|60|2|W|}}) is a conspicuous [[mountain]], 1,265 m, with a few small rock exposures and ice-free cliffs on the southeast side, standing 16 nautical miles (30 km) northwest of [[Cape Sobral]], on the east coast of [[Graham Land]]. Charted in 1947 by the [[Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey]] (FIDS) and named for [[F.K. Elliott]], leader of the FIDS base at [[Hope Bay]] in 1947 and 1948.

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[[Category:Mountains of Antarctica|Elliott, Mount]]

Ellipsoid Hill[edit]

'''Ellipsoid Hill''' ({{coor dm|77|48|S|163|49|E|}}) is a rounded, partly ice-covered summit (1,130 m) to the north of [[Blue Glacier]], between [[Geoid Glacier]] and [[Spheroid Hill]], in [[Victoria Land]]. The name is one of a group in the area associated with surveying applied in 1993 by [[New Zealand Geographic Board]] (NZGB). Named from ellipsoid, in geodesy a mathematical figure formed by revolving an ellipse about its minor axis.

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Ellis Bluff[edit]

'''Ellis Bluff''' ({{coor dm|85|20|S|175|35|W|}}) is a rock bluff rising to 2,280 m at the south side of the mouth of [[Logie Glacier]], in the [[Cumulus Hills]]. Named by [[Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names]] (US-ACAN) for [[W. Ellis]], a chief air controlman, [[U.S. Navy]], during [[Operation Deepfreeze]] 1965 and 1966.

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Ellis Cone[edit]

'''Ellis Cone''' ({{coor dm|75|49|S|116|23|W|}}) is an one of several small cones or cone remnants along the southwest side of [[Toney Mountain]] in [[Marie Byrd Land]]. Mapped by [[United States Geological Survey]] (USGS) from surveys and [[U.S. Navy]] air photos, 1959-66. Named by [[Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names]] (US-ACAN) for [[Homer L. Ellis]], ACC, U.S. Navy, radar air traffic controller at [[McMurdo Station]], winter party 1968, and chief in charge of the ground controlled approach unit at the [[Byrd Station]] skiway landing strip, summer season, 1969-70.

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Ellis Fjord[edit]

'''Ellis Fjord''' ({{coor dm|68|36|S|78|5|E|}}) is a long narrow fjord between [[Breidnes Peninsula]] and [[Mule Peninsula]] in the [[Vestfold Hills]]. Photographed by the [[Lars Christensen Expedition]] (1936-37), and plotted by Norwegian cartographers as a [[bay]] and a remnant [[lake]] which were called Mulvik (snout bay) and Langevatnet (the long lake) respectively. Analysis by [[John Roscoe]] of air photos taken by [[U.S. Navy Operation Highjump]] (1946-47) showed these two features to be connected. The feature was renamed Ellis Fjord by Roscoe after [[Edwin E. Ellis]], aerial photographer on U.S. Navy Operation Highjump flights over this area.

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Ellis Glacier[edit]

'''Ellis Glacier''' ({{coor dm|71|58|S|24|17|E|}}) is a [[glacier]], 4 nautical miles (7 km) long, flowing north from [[Mount Walnum]] between Gillock and [[Jennings Glaciers]] in the [[Sor Rondane Mountains]]. Mapped by Norwegian cartographers in 1957 from air photos taken by [[U.S. Navy Operation Highjump]], 1946-47, and named for [[Edwin E. Ellis]], aerial photographer on U.S. Navy Operation Highjump photographic flights in this area and other coastal areas between 14 and 164 East.

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Ellis Ridge[edit]

'''Ellis Ridge''' ({{coor dm|74|45|S|113|54|W|}}) is an ice-covered ridge, 10 nautical miles (18 km) long and 1.5 nautical miles (2.8 km) wide, extending northeast from [[Jenkins Heights]] between [[Dorchuck Glacier]] and [[Keys Glacier]], on [[Walgreen Coast]], [[Marie Byrd Land]]. Mapped by [[United States Geological Survey]] (USGS) from surveys and [[U.S. Navy]] aerial photographs, 1959-67, and [[U.S. Landsat]] imagery, 1972-73. Named by [[Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names]] (US-ACAN) for [[Melvin Y. Ellis]], USGS cartographer, a member of the USGS satellite surveying team at [[South Pole Station]], winter party 1974.

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Mount Ellis[edit]

'''Mount Ellis''' ({{coor dm|79|52|S|156|14|E|}}) is the highest point, 2,330 m, of the [[Darwin Mountains]], surmounting the northern edge of [[Midnight Plateau]]. Mapped by the [[Darwin Glacier Party]] of the [[Commonwealth Trans-Antarctic Expedition]] (1956-58). Named for [[M.R. Ellis]], engineer with the Commonwealth Trans-Antarctic Expedition, who accompanied [[Sir Edmund Hillary]] to the [[South Pole]].

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Ellsworth Land[edit]

'''Ellsworth Land''' ({{coor dm|75|30|S|80|0|W|}}) is that portion of the Antarctic continent bounded on the west by [[Marie Byrd Land]], on the north by [[Bellingshausen Sea]], on the northeast by the base of [[Antarctic Peninsula]], and on the east by the western margin of [[Ronne Ice Shelf]]. It is largely a high ice plateau, but includes the majestic [[Ellsworth Mountains]] and a number of scattered [[mountain]] groups as the Hudson, Jones, Behrendt, Merrick, Sweeney and [[Scaife Mountains]]. This land lies near the center of the area traversed by American explorer [[Lincoln Ellsworth]] on an airplane flight during [[November-December]] 1935. It was named for him by [[Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names]] (US-ACAN) (1962) to commemorate that historic transcontinental flight from [[Dundee Island]] to the [[Ross Ice Shelf]].

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Ellsworth Mountains[edit]

'''Ellsworth Mountains''' ({{coor dm|78|45|S|85|0|W|}}) is a major group of mountains, 200 nautical miles (370 km) long and 30 nautical miles (60 km) wide, which trend NNW-SSE and rise from the relatively featureless snow plain that borders the western margin of the [[Ronne Ice Shelf]]. They are bisected by [[Minnesota Glacier]] to form the northern [[Sentinel Range]] and the southern [[Heritage Range]]. The former is by far the higher and more spectacular with [[Vinson Massif]] (5,140 m) constituting the highest point on the continent. The mountains were discovered on [[November 23]], [[1935]], by [[Lincoln Ellsworth]] in the course of a trans-Antarctic flight from [[Dundee Island]] to the [[Ross Ice Shelf]]. He gave the descriptive name Sentinel Range. The mountains were mapped in detail by [[United States Geological Survey]] (USGS) from ground surveys and [[U.S. Navy]] aerial photography, 1958-66. When it became evident that the mountains comprise two distinct ranges, the [[Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names]] (US-ACAN) restricted the application of Sentinel Range to the high northern one and gave the name Heritage Range to the southern one; the Committee recommended the name of the discoverer for this entire group of mountains.

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Ellsworth Subglacial Highlands[edit]

'''Ellsworth Subglacial Highlands''' ({{coor dm|80|30|S|94|0|W|}}) is a line of subglacial highlands in [[West Antarctica]] that extend west-southwest from central [[Ellsworth Mountains]] to the vicinity of [[Mount Moore]] and [[Mount Woollard]]. The existence of the feature was first indicated from seismic soundings by the [[Marie Byrd Land Traverse Party]], 1957-58, led by [[Charles R. Bentley]]. It was delineated in detail by the [[Scott Polar Research Institute]] (SPRI)-[[National Science Foundation]] (NSF)-[[Technical University of Denmark]] (TUD) airborne radio echo sounding program, 1967-79, and named in association with the Ellsworth Mountains.

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Cape Ellsworth[edit]

'''Cape Ellsworth''' ({{coor dm|66|17|S|162|18|E|}}) is a sheer rock bluff (290 m) forming the north end of [[Young Island]] in the [[Balleny Islands]]. Named by personnel of the Ellsworth. The vessel, after picking up Ellsworth at [[Little America]] on the [[Ross Ice Shelf]] made a running survey around the northern end of the Balleny Islands on the way back to Australia.

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica|Ellsworth, Cape]]

Mount Ellsworth[edit]

'''Mount Ellsworth''' ({{coor dm|85|45|S|161|0|W|}}) is the highest [[peak]], 2,925 m, on the elongated massif between Steagall and [[Amundsen Glaciers]], in the [[Queen Maud Mountains]]. Discovered by [[R. Admiral Byrd]] on the [[South Pole]] flight of November 28-29, 1929, and named by him for [[Lincoln Ellsworth]], [[American Antarctic]] explorer.

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[[Category:Mountains of Antarctica|Ellsworth, Mount]]

Ellyard Nunatak[edit]

'''Ellyard Nunatak''' ({{coor dm|70|19|S|64|54|E|}}) is a [[nunatak]] on the north side of [[Scylla Glacier]], about 7 nautical miles (13 km) south-southeast of [[Mount Bechervaise]], in the [[Prince Charles Mountains]]. Plotted from ANARE ([[Australian National Antarctic Research Expeditions]]) air photos of 1965. Named by [[Antarctic Names Committee of Australia]] (ANCA) for [[D.G. Ellyard]], physicist at [[Mawson Station]] in 1966.

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[[Category:Mountains of Antarctica]]

Elmers Nunatak[edit]

'''Elmers Nunatak''' ({{coor dm|83|58|S|55|25|W|}}) is a prominent [[nunatak]] 5 nautical miles (9 km) southeast of [[Mount Hawkes]] in the [[Neptune Range]], [[Pensacola Mountains]]. Mapped by [[United States Geological Survey]] (USGS) from surveys and [[U.S. Navy]] air photos, 1956-66. Named by [[Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names]] (US-ACAN) for [[Elmer H. Smith]], aerographer with the wintering parties at [[Ellsworth Station]] in 1958 and [[McMurdo Station]] in 1961.

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[[Category:Mountains of Antarctica]]

Else Nunataks[edit]

'''Else Nunataks''' ({{coor dm|67|21|S|55|40|E|}}) is a group of low, partially snow-covered [[nunatak]]s 3 nautical miles (6 km) north of [[Mount Oydeholmen]], on the south, side of [[Wilma Glacier]], [[Enderby Land]]. Mapped from ANARE ([[Australian National Antarctic Research Expeditions]]) surveys and air photos, 1954-66. Named by [[Antarctic Names Committee of Australia]] (ANCA) for [[H. Else]], pilot with ANARE ([[Nella Dan]]), 1965.

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[[Category:Mountains of Antarctica]]

Else Platform[edit]

'''Else Platform''' ({{coor dm|70|22|S|66|48|E|}}) is an elevated, flat-topped mass of rock at the north end of [[Jetty Peninsula]], Mac. [[Robertson Land]]. The feature was the site of a survey station occupied by [[M.N. Rubeli]], surveyor with the ANARE ([[Australian National Antarctic Research Expeditions]]) [[Prince Charles Mountains]] survey in 1969. Named after [[H. Else]], helicopter pilot with the survey.

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica]]

Elsehul[edit]

'''Elsehul''' ({{coor dm|54|1|S|37|59|W|}}) is a [[bay]] 0.5 nautical miles (0.9 km) wide, entered close west of [[Cape Pride]] along the north coast of [[South Georgia]]. The name dates back to the period 1905-12 and was probably applied by Norwegian sealers and whalers working in the area.

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica]]

Elsner Ridge[edit]

'''Elsner Ridge''' ({{coor dm|71|47|S|167|21|E|}}) is a narrow, southwest-trending ridge, or spur, 6 nautical miles (11 km) long, located 4 nautical miles (7 km) northeast of the south end of [[Homerun Range]] in the [[Admiralty Mountains]]. Mapped by [[United States Geological Survey]] (USGS) from surveys and [[U.S. Navy]], aerial photographs, 1960-63. Named by [[Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names]] (US-ACAN) for [[Robert W. Elsner]], [[United States Antarctic Research Program]] (USARP) biologist at [[McMurdo Station]], 1967-68, 1968-69 and 1969-70.

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica]]

Eltanin Bay[edit]

'''Eltanin Bay''' ({{coor dm|73|40|S|82|0|W|}}) is a [[bay]] about 35 nautical miles (60 km) wide in southern [[Bellingshausen Sea]]. It indents the coast of [[Ellsworth Land]] west of [[Wirth Peninsula]]. Mapped by [[United States Geological Survey]] (USGS) from surveys and [[U.S. Navy]] air photos, 1961-66. Named by [[Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names]] (US-ACAN) for the [[United States Antarctic Research Program]] (USARP) oceanographic research ship [[South Pacific Ocean]].

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica]]

Elton Hill[edit]

'''Elton Hill''' ({{coor dm|68|50|S|66|35|W|}}) is a prominent rocky hill (1,000 m) which marks the southeast limit of [[Meridian Glacier]] at its junction with [[Clarke Glacier]] in southern [[Graham Land]]. First seen from the air and photographed by [[Ronne Antarctic Research Expedition]] (RARE), November 1947. Surveyed by [[Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey]] (FIDS), December 1958. Named by [[United Kingdom Antarctic Place-Names Committee]] (UK-APC) after [[John Elton]], English inventor of the artificial horizon and its application to quadrants and sextants, in 1732.

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica]]

Elvers Peak[edit]

'''Elvers Peak''' ({{coor dm|79|52|S|83|33|W|}}) is a [[peak]], 1,615 m, at the southeast end of [[Edson Hills]] in the [[Heritage Range]]. Mapped by [[United States Geological Survey]] (USGS) from surveys and [[U.S. Navy]] air photos, 1961-66. Named by [[Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names]] (US-ACAN) for [[Douglas J. Elvers]], seismologist on the [[United States Antarctic Research Program]] (USARP) [[South Pole-Queen Maud Land Traverse II]], in 1965-66.

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[[Category:Mountains of Antarctica]]

Ely Nunatak[edit]

'''Ely Nunatak''' ({{coor dm|72|8|S|66|30|E|}}) is a small, dark-colored [[nunatak]] 4 nautical miles (7 km) north of [[Mount Izabelle]] in the [[Prince Charles Mountains]]. The position of the nunatak was fixed by intersection from geodetic survey stations in 1971. Named by [[Antarctic Names Committee of Australia]] (ANCA) for [[J. Ely]], [[Technical Officer]] (survey) with the ANARE ([[Australian National Antarctic Research Expeditions]]) Prince Charles Mountains survey in 1971.

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[[Category:Mountains of Antarctica]]

Embassy Islands[edit]

'''Embassy Islands''' ({{coor dm|67|53|S|68|45|W|}}) is a two small islands, the westernmost of the [[Dion Islands]], lying 7 nautical miles (13 km) south of [[Adelaide Island]]. The Dion Islands were first sighted and roughly charted in 1909 by the [[French Antarctic Expedition]] under Charcot. This feature was surveyed in 1949 by the [[Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey]] (FIDS) and named [[Embassy Rock]] by the [[United Kingdom Antarctic Place-Names Committee]] (UK-APC) because of its detached position in association with [[Emperor Island]]. In 1963 the [[British Royal Navy Hydrographic Survey Unit]] found there were two islands, not one as previously supposed.

== See also ==
* [[List of antarctic and sub-antarctic islands]]

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[[Category:Islands of Antarctica]]

Embree Glacier[edit]

'''Embree Glacier''' ({{coor dm|77|59|S|85|10|W|}}) is a [[glacier]] 20 nautical miles (37 km) long in the north-central part of the [[Sentinel Range]], flowing north-northeast from the slopes of [[Mount Anderson]] and [[Mount Bentley]] and then east to its terminus opposite [[Mount Tegge]] on the east side of the range. Named by the [[Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names]] (US-ACAN) for Maj. [[Henry Embree]], [[United States Air Force]] (USAF), who participated in the establishment of the [[South Pole Station]] in 1956.

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[[Category:Glaciers of Antarctica]]

Emeline Island[edit]

'''Emeline Island''' ({{coor dm|62|24|S|59|48|W|}}) is an one of the [[Aitcho Islands]], lying 2 nautical miles (3.7 km) northwest of [[Cecilia Island]] in the [[South Shetland Islands]]. Named by the [[United Kingdom Antarctic Place-Names Committee]] (UK-APC) in 1961 after the American sealing vessel Emeline (Captain [[Jeremiah Holmes]]) from Stonington, CT, which visited the South Shetland Islands in 1820-21 and operated from nearby [[Clothier Harbor]].

== See also ==
* [[List of antarctic and sub-antarctic islands]]

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[[Category:Sub-antarctic islands]]

Emerald Cove[edit]

'''Emerald Cove''' ({{coor dm|61|35|S|57|46|W|}}) is a [[cove]] 2 nautical miles (3.7 km) wide, lying between [[North Foreland]] and [[Brimstone Peak]] on the north coast of [[King George Island]], in the [[South Shetland Islands]]. The name Shireff's Cove (sic) was given by [[William Smith]] in 1819, after Captain [[William H. Shirreff]], [[Royal Navy]], to whom he reported his discovery of the South Shetland Islands. In 1820, Smith's description of his landing on North Foreland was confused with his description of features on northern [[Livingston Island]], and the name was applied to a feature on that [[island]], where it has been officially accepted. Emerald Cove was applied by the [[United Kingdom Antarctic Place-Names Committee]] (UK-APC) in 1960 and is for the brig Emerald (Captain [[John G. Scott]]) from Boston, MA, which visited the South Shetland Islands in 1820-21 in company with the Esther. These two vessels rescued the crew of the Venus from [[Esther Harbor]] in March 1821.

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica]]

Emerald Fracture Zone[edit]

'''Emerald Fracture Zone''' ({{coor dm|62|0|S|170|0|E|}}) is an undersea fracture zone running the distance from the southwest corner of the [[Campbell Plateau]] to the northern tip of [[Iselin Bank]]. Name proposed by Dr. [[Steven C. Cande]], [[Scripps Institution]] of Oceanography for the vessel Emerald, which traversed this region in 1821. Name approved 6/97 (ACUF 270).

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica]]

Emerald Icefalls[edit]

'''Emerald Icefalls''' ({{coor dm|62|9|S|58|34|W|}}) is an icefalls along the north side of [[Ezcurra Inlet]], [[Admiralty Bay]], [[King George Island]]. So named by the [[Polish Antarctic Expedition]], 1980, from the color of the serac.

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica]]

Emerald Lake[edit]

'''Emerald Lake''' ({{coor dm|60|43|S|45|39|W|}}) is a small [[lake]] in western [[Signy Island]], about 0.6 nautical miles (1.1 km) southeast of [[Jebsen Point]]. The name, applied by [[United Kingdom Antarctic Place-Names Committee]] (UK-APC), describes the unique (for Signy Island) color of the water.

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[[Category:Lakes of Antarctica]]

Emerald Nunatak[edit]

'''Emerald Nunatak''' ({{coor dm|69|39|S|69|59|W|}}) is a [[nunatak]] (1,250 m) on the west side of [[Douglas Range]] near the head of [[Hampton Glacier]], northeast [[Alexander Island]]. So named by [[United Kingdom Antarctic Place-Names Committee]] (UK-APC) following surveys by [[British Antarctic Survey]] (BAS), 1973-77, because of the greenish rock of which the feature is composed.

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[[Category:Mountains of Antarctica]]

Emerging Island[edit]

'''Emerging Island''' ({{coor dm|73|23|S|168|2|E|}}) is an ice-covered [[island]] 2 nautical miles (3.7 km) long, lying 1.5 nautical miles (2.8 km) east of [[Index Point]], [[Victoria Land]], in the north part of [[Lady Newnes Bay]]. The feature appears to be barely emerging above the ice at the terminus of [[Mariner Glacier]]. Named in 1966 by the [[New Zealand Antarctic Place-Names Committee]] (NZ-APC).

== See also ==
* [[List of antarctic and sub-antarctic islands]]

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[[Category:Islands of Antarctica]]

Mount Emerson[edit]

'''Mount Emerson''' ({{coor dm|71|35|S|168|44|E|}}) is a [[mountain]] (2,190 m) 5 nautical miles (9 km) east-southeast of [[Brewer Peak]] in the south part of [[DuBridge Range]], [[Admiraity Mountains]]. Mapped by [[United States Geological Survey]] (USGS) from surveys and [[U.S. Navy]] air photos, 1960-63. Named by [[Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names]] (US-ACAN) for [[George L. Emerson]], SW1, U.S. Navy, Steelworker at [[McMurdo Station]], 1967.

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[[Category:Mountains of Antarctica|Emerson, Mount]]

Mount Emily[edit]

'''Mount Emily''' ({{coor dm|85|50|S|174|20|E|}}) is a rock [[peak]] 2 nautical miles (3.7 km) north of [[Mount Cecily]], in the [[Grosvenor Mountains]]. Shown by the [[British Antarctic Expedition]] (1907-09) as being part of the [[Dominion Range]], but it is separated from that range by the flow of the [[Mill Glacier]]. Named by Shackleton for his wife, [[Lady Emily Dorman Shackleton]].

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[[Category:Mountains of Antarctica|Emily, Mount]]

Mount Emison[edit]

'''Mount Emison''' ({{coor dm|74|12|S|163|44|E|}}) is a prominent [[mountain]], 2,050 m, rising on the west side of [[Campbell Glacier]], just north of the mouth of [[Bates Glacier]], in the [[Deep Freeze Range]], [[Victoria Land]]. Mapped by [[United States Geological Survey]] (USGS) from surveys and [[U.S. Navy]] air photos, 1955-63. Named by [[Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names]] (US-ACAN) after [[William B. Emison]], biologist at [[McMurdo Station]], 1964-65 and 1965-66 seasons.

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[[Category:Mountains of Antarctica|Emison, Mount]]

Emlen Peaks[edit]

'''Emlen Peaks''' ({{coor dm|71|54|S|160|35|E|}}) is a group of scattered peaks and [[nunatak]]s, 16 nautical miles (30 km) long and 7 nautical miles (13 km) wide, lying 6 nautical miles (11 km) south of [[Daniels Range]] in the south end of the [[Usarp Mountains]]. Mapped by [[United States Geological Survey]] (USGS) from surveys and [[U.S. Navy]] air photos, 1960-63. Named by [[Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names]] (US-ACAN) after [[John T. Emlen]], biologist, University of Wisconsin, program leader who made penguin navigational studies on the [[Ross Ice Shelf]], the interior of [[Victoria Land]], and elsewhere in Antarctica, 1962-63.

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[[Category:Mountains of Antarctica]]

Emm Rock[edit]

'''Emm Rock''' ({{coor dm|62|16|S|58|42|W|}}) is a conspicuous rock 30 m high, lying 0.5 nautical miles (0.9 km) off the south coast of [[King George Island]] at the east side of the entrance to [[Potter Cove]], in the [[South Shetland Islands]]. This rock, presumably known to early sealers in the area, was sketched by the [[French Antarctic Expedition]], 1908-10, under Charcot, and charted by DI personnel on the [[Discovey II]] in 1935. The name derives from the shape of the rock, which resembles the letter M.

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[[Category:Geography of Antarctica]]

Emma Island[edit]

'''Emma Island''' ({{coor dm|64|36|S|62|20|W|}}) is an [[island]] 1.5 nautical miles (2.8 km) long, with bare jagged peaks projecting through an icecap, lying 4 nautical miles (7 km) west of [[Nansen Island]] in the southwest half of the entrance to [[Wilhelmina Bay]], off the west coast of [[Graham Land]]. Discovered by the [[Belgian Antarctic Expedition]], 1897-99, under Lieutenant Adrien de Gerlache, and named after his mother, Emma de Gerlache de Gomery.

== See also ==
* [[List of antarctic and sub-antarctic islands]]

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[[Category:Sub-antarctic islands]]