William Lyford

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William Lyford (1598–1653) was an English nonconformist clergyman, elected to the Westminster Assembly though not sitting in it.

Life[edit]

Lyford was born at Peasemore, near Newbury in Berkshire, the son of the rector, an elder William Lyford and his wife, Mary Smith.[1] He entered Magdalen Hall, Oxford, as a commoner on 26 April 1615, became a demy of Magdalen College in 1617, and graduated B.A. on 16 December 1618. He proceeded M.A. on 14 June 1621 (incorporated at Cambridge 1623), and B.D. 12 May 1631.[2] On the presentation of John Digby, 1st Earl of Bristol, he became vicar of Sherborne, Dorset, in 1631.

His Calvinistic views left him undisturbed during the civil war; he was chosen member of the Westminster Assembly, but did not sit. In 1653 he was allowed an annuity out of Lord Digby's estate. Lyford died at Sherborne on 3 October 1653, and was buried under the communion table in the chancel of the church. By his wife Elizabeth he left children.

Works[edit]

Lyford published:

  • Principles of Faith and Good Conscience digested into a Catechistical Form, London, 1642; 5th edit. Oxford, 1658.
  • An Apology for our Public Ministry and Infant Baptism, London, 1653; 3rd edit. 1657.

Posthumous were:

  • The Plain Man's Senses exercised to discern both Good and Evil, London, 1655, with a funeral sermon by W. H., D.D., which was also issued separately.
  • William Lyford his Legacy, or a Help for Young People to prepare them for the Sacrament, London, 1656; 2nd edit. 1658.
  • Cases of Conscience propounded in the Time of Rebellion resolved, London, 1661.

Lyford edited in 1634 the second edition of William Pinke's Tryall of a Christians syncere Love unto Christ.

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Ford, David Nash (2011). "William Lyford (1598-1653)". Royal Berkshire History. Nash Ford Publishing. Retrieved 5 January 2014. 
  2. ^ "Lyford, William (LFRT623W)". A Cambridge Alumni Database. University of Cambridge. 

References[edit]