1981 San Diego Chargers season

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1981 San Diego Chargers season
Head coach Don Coryell
Home field Jack Murphy Stadium
Results
Record 10–6
Division place 1st AFC West
Playoff finish Won Divisional Playoffs (Dolphins) (41–38 OT)
Lost Conference Playoffs (Bengals) (27–7)
Timeline
Previous season Next season
< 1980 1982 >

The 1981 San Diego Chargers season began with the team trying to improve on their 11–5 record in 1980. In the playoffs they beat the Dolphins in a game known as the Epic in Miami and lost to the Bengals in a game known as the Freezer Bowl.

1981 was the second straight season in which the Chargers reached the AFC Championship Game,[1] as well as their second consecutive loss.

Running back Chuck Muncie enjoyed his best season, running for 1,144 yards and 19 touchdowns, tying the then-NFL season record for rushing touchdowns.[2][3]

During this season, the Chargers lost two key players by way of trade. Before Week 3, wide receiver John Jefferson was dealt to the Green Bay Packers, while defensive end Fred Dean would be dealt to the eventual Super Bowl champion San Francisco 49ers by Week 5. The season was chronicled on September 18, 2008 for America's Game: The Missing Rings, as one of the five greatest NFL teams to never win the Super Bowl.

Schedule[edit]

Week Date Opponent Result Attendance
1 September 7, 1981 at Cleveland Browns W 44–14
78,904
2 September 13, 1981 Detroit Lions W 28–23
51,264
3 September 20, 1981 at Kansas City Chiefs W 42–31
63,866
4 September 27, 1981 at Denver Broncos L 42–24
74,822
5 October 4, 1981 Seattle Seahawks W 24–10
51,463
6 October 11, 1981 Minnesota Vikings L 33–31
50,708
7 October 18, 1981 at Baltimore Colts W 43–14
41,921
8 October 25, 1981 at Chicago Bears L 20–17
52,906
9 November 1, 1981 Kansas City Chiefs W 22–20
51,307
10 November 8, 1981 Cincinnati Bengals L 40–17
51,259
11 November 16, 1981 at Seattle Seahawks L 44–23
58,628
12 November 22, 1981 at Oakland Raiders W 55–21
50,199
13 November 29, 1981 Denver Broncos W 34–17
51,533
14 December 6, 1981 Buffalo Bills L 28–27
51,488
15 December 13, 1981 at Tampa Bay Buccaneers W 24–23
67,388
16 December 21, 1981 Oakland Raiders W 23–10
52,279

Game summaries[edit]

Week 1: at Cleveland Browns[edit]

Week 2: vs. Detroit Lions[edit]

Week 3: at Kansas City Chiefs[edit]

Week 4: at Denver Broncos[edit]

Week 5: vs. Seattle Seahawks[edit]

Week 6: vs. Minnesota Vikings[edit]

Week 7: at Baltimore Colts[edit]

Week 8: at Chicago Bears[edit]

Week 9: vs. Kansas City Chiefs[edit]

Week 10: vs. Cincinnati Bengals[edit]

Week 11: at Seattle Seahawks[edit]

Week 12: at Oakland Raiders[edit]

San Diego Chargers at Oakland Raiders
1 2 3 4 Total
Chargers 7 21 20 7 55
Raiders 7 14 0 0 21

Stats

  • Dan Fouts 28/44, 296 Yds, 6 TD, INT
  • Kellen Winslow 13 Rec, 144 Yds, 5 TD


Week 13: vs. Denver Broncos[edit]

Week 14: vs. Buffalo Bills[edit]

Week 15: at Tampa Bay Buccaneers[edit]

The game came down to the wire. A late interception from Buccaneers Quarterback Doug Williams at the Chargers own 1 yard-line sealed the deal for San Diego

Week 16: vs. Oakland Raiders[edit]

Oakland Raiders at San Diego Chargers
1 2 3 4 Total
Raiders 0 3 7 0 10
Chargers 7 10 3 3 23

Last regular season game of NFL season.


Playoffs[edit]

Week Date Opponent Result Attendance Nickname
Divisional January 2, 1982 at Miami Dolphins W 41–38
73,735
"The Epic in Miami"
Conference Championship January 10, 1982 at Cincinnati Bengals L 27–7
46,302
"The Freezer Bowl"

Standings[edit]

AFC West
W L T PCT DIV CONF PF PA
San Diego Chargers(3) 10 6 0 .625 6–2 8–4 478 390
Denver Broncos 10 6 0 .625 5–3 7–5 321 289
Kansas City Chiefs 9 7 0 .563 5–3 7–5 343 290
Oakland Raiders 7 9 0 .438 2–6 5–7 273 343
Seattle Seahawks 6 10 0 .375 2–6 6–8 322 388

[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ The Chargers lost to the Raiders the season before
  2. ^ "Chuck Muncie dies at age 60". ESPN.com. May 14, 2013. Archived from the original on May 16, 2013. 
  3. ^ "AFC West". Sports Illustrated. September 1, 1982. Archived from the original on September 13, 2011. 
  4. ^ 2010 NFL Record and Fact Book (PDF). National Football League. p. 385. Retrieved March 7, 2011. 

External links[edit]