Australian National Living Treasures

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Australian National Living Treasures are people who have made outstanding contributions to Australian society in any field of human endeavour. In 1997 the National Trust of Australia (NSW) called for nominations from the public for 100 Australian Living Treasures and each nomination was counted as one vote. The nominees had to be living and had to have made a substantial and enduring contribution. The choice of those who were named as National Living Treasures was made via more than 10,000 Australians voting. Their votes determined who was chosen. The first list of 100 Living Treasures was published in 1997.

In 2004 the list was refreshed with 15 names, following the deaths of notable Australians and the exclusion of disgraced former Justice Marcus Einfeld,[1] following an identical process to that used in 1997 – a public nomination and vote.

On 23 January 2012, the National Trust of Australia (NSW) joined with Woman's Day magazine to launch a nationwide search for seven new National Living Treasures. They were announced, amid controversy,[2] on 4 March 2012.[3][4]

On 30 July 2014, the board of the National Trust of Australia (NSW) voted to remove Rolf Harris from the list after his conviction on twelve charges of indecent assault between 1969 and 1986, and to withdraw the award.[5] Harris had been among the original 100 Australians selected for the honour in 1997.

Current list[edit]

As of February 2014 the list, in alphabetical order, acknowledges the contributions made by 88 living Australians, as follows:[5]

Deceased (formerly listed)[edit]

Removed while living[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "15 Australians honoured as 'national living treasures'". Australia: ABC News. 14 March 2004. Retrieved 18 July 2010. 
  2. ^ Christine Sams, Cosima Marriner: National living treasure uproar, The Sydney Morning Herald, 4 March 2012. Accessed 16 March 2012.
  3. ^ "Kylie, Olivia and... Clive?". The Sydney Morning Herald. AAP. 4 March 2012. Retrieved 4 March 2012. 
  4. ^ "National Trust announces seven new National Living Treasures" (Press release). National Trust of Australia (NSW). 4 March 2012. Retrieved 8 March 2012. 
  5. ^ a b c "List of National Living Treasures". National Trust of Australia. Retrieved 29 August 2014. 
  6. ^ Clennell, Andrew; Wood, Alicia (24 January 2013). "O'Shane to retire from life on bench". The Australian. Retrieved 27 February 2015. 
  7. ^ Daniele, Linda (1 November 2008). "Marcus Einfeld: From living treasure to liar". The Australian. Retrieved 18 July 2010. 

External links[edit]