BMW M30

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BMW M30
Bmw-m30b35-right.jpg
Overview
Manufacturer BMW
Production 1968–1994
Combustion chamber
Configuration Straight-6
Chronology
Successor BMW M60 V8
BMW M52

The BMW M30 (early models are sometimes referred to as "M06") is a straight-6 SOHC piston engine which was used over a 28 year lifespan over many BMW models. Ward's have rated the M30 as one of the "Top Engines of the 20th Century".[1]

It has been given the nicknames of 'Big Six' and 'Senior Six', following the introduction of the smaller BMW M20 straight-six in the late 1970s.

Development[edit]

The M30 was originally developed in the late 1960s, loosely based on the straight-four BMW M10 engine first used in the 'Neue Klasse' BMW 1500.[2] Several features, including a 30-degree cant to the right for a lower profile, a crossflow head design, and a chain-driven single overhead cam with rocker arm valve actuation, are common between the M10 and the M30.[3] Further similarities include a cast-iron block and an aluminium head, hemispherical combustion chambers, and a forged crankshaft. The first two engines introduced were the 2.5 and the 2.8 litre option, both short-stroke engines sharing a common bore.[2]

Models[edit]

Engine Displacement Power Torque Redline CR Year
2500 version 2494 cc 110 kW (147 hp) @ 6000 211 N·m (156 lb·ft) @ 3700 9.0 1968
2800 version 2788 cc 125 kW (168 hp) @ 6000 234 N·m (173 lb·ft) @ 3700 9.0 1968
3.0CS version 2986 cc 132 kW (177 hp) @ 6000 255 N·m (188 lb·ft) @ 3700 9.0 1971
3.0CSi version 2986 cc 147 kW (197 hp) @ 5500 272 N·m (201 lb·ft) @ 4300 9.5 1971
M30B25 2494 cc 110 kW (147 hp) @ 6000 211 N·m (156 lb·ft) @ 3700 9.0 1973
M30B28
carburetor
2788 cc 125 kW (168 hp) @ 5800 233 N·m (172 lb·ft) @ 4000 9.3 1975
M30B28
injected
2788 cc 135 kW (181 hp) @ 5800 240 N·m (180 lb·ft) @ 4200 6500 9.3 1978
M30B30 2986 cc 130-140 kW 1975
M30B32 3210 cc 145 kW (194 hp) @ 5500 285 N·m (210 lb·ft) @ 4300 1976
M30B34
North America
3428 cc 136 kW @ (182 hp) 5400 290 N·m (210 lb·ft) @ 4000 6200 8.0 1985
M30B34
Europe
3428 cc 163 kW @ (218 hp) 5800 310 N·m (230 lb·ft) @ 4200 10.0 1985
M30B35 3428 cc 155 kW (207 hp) @ 5700 305 N·m (225 lb·ft) @ 4000 6200 9.0 1988

2.5 litre[edit]

The first model to use the 2494 cc version of the M30 was the E3 2500 in 1968. This, called the M30B25, is the smallest of the M30 engines. Unless otherwise noted, these engines use a carburetor.

Applications:

  • 1968-1972 E3 2500
  • 1974-1975 E9 2.5 CS
  • 1973–1976 E12 525 (107 kW)
  • 1975-1979 E23 725 (110 kW)
  • 1976–1981 E12 525 (110 kW)
  • 1981–1987 E28 525i (110 kW, fuel injected)[4]

2.8 litre[edit]

A 2.8 litre version of the M30, this appeared in 1968 in the then new E3 2800 and E9 2800CS. It has a bore of 86 mm, a stroke of 80 mm and a displacement of 2,788 cc (170.1 cu in).[5] In the E24 628 CSi, it uses Bosch L-Jetronic fuel injection.[5] Originally, two Solex Zenith "35/40 INAT" carburetors are used, the compression ratio is 9.0:1 and the engine produces 170 PS (125 kW) and 24.0 kg·m (235 N·m; 174 lb·ft).[6]

Applications:

  • 1968-1971 E3 2800
  • 1971 E3 Bavaria
  • 1968-1971 E9 2800CS
  • 1975-1976 E12 528 (125 kW, carburetor)[7]
  • 1977-1979 E23 728 (125 kW, carburetor)
  • 1976-1978 E12 528 (130 kW, carburetor)
  • 1977-1978 E12 528i (129 kW, fuel injected, lower compression ratio, North America only)
  • 1978-1981 E12 528i (135 kW, fuel injected)
  • 1979-1986 E23 728i (135 kW, fuel injected)
  • 1979–1987 E24 628CSi (135 kW, fuel injected)
  • 1981-1987 E28 528i (135 kW, fuel injected)[8]

3.0 litre[edit]

This version was produced from 1971 until 1992. It has a bore of 89 mm, a stroke of 80 mm and a displacement of 2986 cc. The first model to use the carburetted version of the 3 litre M30 was the E9 3.0CS. There was also the first fuel-injected M30 version for the CSi and later Si models.

Applications (carburettor):

Fuel injected
  • 1971-1975 E9 3.0CSi
  • 1972-1973 E9 3.0CSL
  • 1974-1975 E3 3.0Si
  • 1975–1978 E12 530 (130 kW, South Africa only)
  • 1975–1978 E12 530i (131 kW, North America only)
  • 1976 E12 530 MLE (147 kW, South Africa only)
  • 1977–1978 E24 630CSi (North America only)
  • 1986–1992 E32 730i (138 kW)
  • 1988–1990 E34 530i (not sold in North America)

M30B32[edit]

Despite having a capacity of 3210 cc, this engine appeared in many cars badged so as to suggest 3.3 litres of displacement, such as the 633i, 3.3 Li, and 733i. It has a bore of 89 mm, a stroke of 86 mm and a capacity of 3210 cc. In the E24 633CSi, it uses Bosch L-Jetronic fuel injection.[5] The US version used L-Jetronic from 1978 to 1982, then changed to Motronic fuel injection in June 1982.

Applications:

  • 1976–1984 E24 633CSi
  • 1976-1977 E3 3.3 Li
  • 1977-1979 E23 733i (145 kW)
  • 1979 E12 533i
  • 1979–1986 E23 732i (144 kW)
  • 1983–1984 E28 533i (North America only)
  • 1984-1986 E30 333i (145 kW, South Africa only)

M30B34[edit]

This engine has a bore of 92.0 mm, a stroke of 86.0 mm and a displacement of 3428cc. In the E24 635CSi, it uses Bosch Motronic 1.0 fuel injection.[5]

With catalytic converter: 8.0:1 compression ratio, 185 brake horsepower (138 kW) - mostly North America and Japan

Applications:

  • 1982–1987 E24 635CSi
  • 1982-1987 E23 735i (160 kW)
  • 1985-1988 E28 535i (136 kW, North America only)
  • 1985-1987 E23 735i (136 kW, North American and Japan only)
  • 1986-1987 E23 L7 (136 kW, North American and Japan only)
  • 1987 E24 L6 (North America only)
  • 1987-1988 E28 535is (136 kW, North America only)


Without catalytic converter: 10.0:1 compression ratio, 218 metric horsepower (160 kW) - Europe and rest of the world

Applications:

M30B35[edit]

It has a bore of 92 mm, a stroke of 86 mm and a capacity of 3428 cc. In the E24 635CSi, it uses Bosch Motronic 1.3 fuel injection.[5]

  • 9.0:1 compression ratio
  • 211 metric horsepower (155 kW) at 5,700 rpm
  • 225 lb·ft (305 N·m) torque at 4,000 rpm
  • 87 AKI / 91 RON octane fuel or better recommended


Applications:

Turbocharging[edit]

Main articles: BMW M102 and BMW M106

The M30 was the basis for the turbocharged M102 and M106 engines.

Motorsport[edit]

The M30 powered a series of BMW 6-cylinder E9 and BMW E24 coupes to European Touring Car Championship (ETCC) throughout the 1970s and into the middle 1980s, even though a more powerful DOHC 24-valve head had been developed for high-performance motorsports and street use.

The BMW M88 high-performance engine is based on the M30 block.[10]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://www.pacemotors.com.au/ArticleView.asp?ArticleID=4
  2. ^ a b Becker, Clauspeter (1971), "BMW 2500/2800", in Logoz, Arthur, Auto-Universum 1971 (in German) (Zürich, Switzerland: Verlag Internationale Automobil-Parade AG) XIV: 70 
  3. ^ Cranswick, Marc (2010). The BMW 5 series and X5: a history of production cars and tuner specials, 1972-2008. Jefferson, NC: McFarland. ISBN 0786443510. 
  4. ^ http://www.carinf.com/en/666086146.html
  5. ^ a b c d e f Oswald, Werner (1. Auflage 2001). Deutsche Autos 1945-1990, Band 4. Stuttgart: Motorbuch Verlag. ISBN 3-613-02131-5. 
  6. ^ Becker, p. 77
  7. ^ http://www.carfolio.com/specifications/models/car/?car=17589
  8. ^ http://www.carfolio.com/specifications/models/car/?car=31713
  9. ^ Büschi, Hans-Ulrich, ed. (March 9, 1989). Automobil Revue 1989 (in German/French) 84. Berne, Switzerland: Hallwag AG. p. 498. ISBN 3-444-00482-6. 
  10. ^ http://www.bmwmregistry.com/model_faq.php?id=4

External links[edit]