Cornelius XBG-3

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XBG-3
Role Bomb glider
Manufacturer Cornelius Aircraft
Primary user United States Army Air Forces
Number built 0
Type Prototype
Serial 42-46911[1]

The Cornelius XBG-3 was an American "bomb glider", developed by the Cornelius Aircraft Corporation for the United States Army Air Forces. Using an unconventional design that included a forward-swept wing, a single prototype was ordered in 1942; however the contract was cancelled later that year before the aircraft had been constructed.

History[edit]

Early in the Second World War, the United States Army Air Forces initiated research into the possibility that gliders, towed by other, conventional aircraft to the area of a target, then released and guided to impact via radio control, could be a useful weapon of war.[2] Essentially an early form of (very large) guided missile,[2] the concept was similar to a Navy project underway at the same time, known as Glomb (from "glider-bomb"),[3] and led to the establishment of the 'BG' series of designations, for 'Bomb Glider', in early 1942.[2][3]

Among the designs considered for use as a bomb glider was an unconventional design submitted by the Cornelius Aircraft Company. Cornelius, having established a reputation for unconventional aircraft designs,[4] proposed a design that featured a "tail-first" configuration,[2] with canard foreplanes and a radical forward-swept wing.[3] The USAAF considered the design interesting enough to award a contract to Cornelius for the construction of a single prototype, designated XBG-3.[5] However the project was cancelled in late 1942, when the bomb glider concept was abandoned by the USAAF.[3][6]

An enlarged, tailess, forward-swept wing glider would be built by Cornelius later in the war, acting as a "flying fuel tank" for long-range bombers, as the XFG-1.[7]

Specifications[edit]

See also[edit]

Related development
Aircraft of comparable role, configuration and era
Related lists

References[edit]

Citations
  1. ^ Baugher 2011
  2. ^ a b c d Gunston 1988, p.28.
  3. ^ a b c d Parsch 2009
  4. ^ Miller 2001, p.297.
  5. ^ Mondey 1978, p.132.
  6. ^ Jane's 1947
  7. ^ "Gliding Gas Tank May May Refuel Planes On Ocean Hops." Popular Science, August 1944, p. 124. Accessed 2011-01-27
Bibliography