Cosmic noise

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Cosmic noise and galactic radio noise is random noise that originates outside the Earth's atmosphere. It can be detected and heard on radio receivers.

Elaboration[edit]

Cosmic noise characteristics are similar to the those of thermal noise. Cosmic noise is experienced at frequencies above about 15 MHz when highly directional antennas are pointed toward the sun or to certain other regions of the sky such as the center of the Milky Way Galaxy. Celestial objects like Quasars, super dense objects that lie far from Earth, emit electromagnetic waves in its full spectrum including radio waves. We can also hear the fall of a meteorite in a radio receiver; as the falling object burns from friction with the Earth's atmosphere, ionizing surrounding gases, thereby producing radio waves. Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation (CMBR) from outer space, discovered by Arno Penzias and Robert Wilson, who later won the Nobel Prize for this discovery, is also a form of cosmic noise. CMBR is thought to be a relic of the Big Bang, and pervades the space almost homogeneously over the entire celestial sphere. The bandwidth of the CMBR is wide, though the peak is in the microwave range.

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