Dayanita Singh

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Dayanita Singh
Born 1961 (age 52–53)
New Delhi
Nationality Indian
Occupation Photographer
Style Documentary, Portrait
Website
dayanitasingh.com

Dayanita Singh (born 1961, New Delhi) is an Indian photographic artist. In 2013, she became the first Indian to have a solo show at London's Hayward Gallery.[1]

Career[edit]

Dayanita Singh in the National Museum, New Delhi in 2014

Singh studied visual communications from 1980 to 1986 at the National Institute of Design in Ahmedabad, and photojournalism in 1987 and 1988 at the International Center of Photography in New York.[2]

Dream Villa was produced during her Robert Gardner Fellowship in Photography given annually by the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology at Harvard University; Singh was its second recipient in 2008.[3]

Her works have been presented in exhibitions throughout the world, most recently at the German pavilion in the Venice Biennale[4] and the "File Museum" at the Frith Street gallery in London.[5][6][7]

In 2009, the Fundación MAPFRE in Madrid organised a retrospective of her work, which subsequently travelled to Amsterdam, Bogota and Umea.[8] Her pictures of "File Rooms" were first presented in the exhibition, "Illuminazione," at the 2011 Venice Biennale.[5]

She has collaborated with the publisher Gerhard Steidl in Goettingen, Germany to make a number of books, including the seven-volume Sent A Letter.[9] This was included in the 2011 Phaidon Press book Defining Contemporary Art: 25 years in 200 Pivotal Artworks (ISBN 9780714862095).[10] Steidl said in a 2013 interview on Deutsche Welle television, "She is the genius of book making".[11]

In 2008 Singh received a Prince Claus Award from the Dutch government for "artistic and intellectual quality".[12]

In 2014, at the National Museum, New Delhi, the photo-based artist, built the Book Museum using her publications, File Room and Privacy as well as her mothers book, Nony Singh: The Archivist. And she also displayed a part of "Kitchen Museum" which are accordion-fold books with silver gelatin prints in 8 teak vitrines that she makes as letters to fellow travellers or conservationists since 2000. Seven of these were published by Steidl as "Sent a Letter".

She has published ten books:

  • Zakir Hussain (1986)
  • Myself, Mona Ahmed (2001)
  • Privacy (2003)
  • Chairs (2005)
  • Go Away Closer (2007)
  • Sent a Letter (2008)
  • Blue Book (2009) [13]
  • Dream Villa (2010),[14]
  • Dayanita Singh (2010)[15]
  • House of Love (2011).[5]
  • File Room (2014).[16]

Solo exhibitions[edit]

Book Museum in the National Museum, New Delhi
Dayanita Singh in the National Museum, New Delhi
  • 2014 Building the Book Museum: photography, language, form National Museum, New Delhi
  • 2013 Go Away Closer, Hayward Gallery, London[5]
  • 2012 Dayanita Singh: File Room, Frith Street Gallery, London[6]
  • 2012 Dayanita Singh / The Adventures of a Photographer, Bildmuseet, Umea University, Sweden
  • 2012 Monuments of Knowledge, Photographs by Dayanita Singh, King's College London[17]
  • 2012 House of Love, Nature Morte, New Delhi[3]
  • 2011 Adventures of a Photographer, Shiseido Gallery, Tokyo[18]
  • 2011 House of Love, Peabody Museum, Harvard University, Cambridge
  • 2011 Dayanita Singh, Museum of Art, Bogota
  • 2010 Dayanita Singh, Mapfre Foundation, Madrid
  • 2010 Dream Villa, Nature Morte, New Delhi[8]
  • 2010 Dayanita Singh (Photographs 1989 – 2010), Huis Marseille, Amsterdam, Netherlands[19]
  • 2009 Blue Book, Nature Morte, New Delhi
  • 2009 Blue Book, Galerie Mirchandani Steinruecke, Bombay
  • 2008 Les Rencontres d'Arles festival, France
  • 2008 Let You Go, Nature Morte, Berlin[8]
  • 2008 Dream Villa, Frith Street Gallery, London[20]
  • 2008 Sent a Letter, Alliance Francaise, New Delhi
  • 2008 Sent a Letter, National Gallery of Modern Art, Mumbai
  • 2008 Ladies of Calcutta, Bose Pacia Gallery, Calcutta[8]
  • 2007 Go Away Closer, Kriti gallery, Varanasi[21]
  • 2007 Go Away Closer, Gallerie Steinruecke Mirchandani, Mumbai[21]
  • 2007 Beds and Chairs, Gallery Chemould, Mumbai
  • 2006 Beds and Chairs, Valentina Bonomo gallery, Rome[8]
  • 2006 Go Away Closer, Nature Morte, New Delhi[21]
  • 2005 Chairs, Isabella Stewart Gardner museum, Boston[22]
  • 2005 Chairs, Frith Street Gallery, London
  • 2005 Chairs, Studio Guenzani, Milan
  • 2004 Privacy, Rencontres-Arles, Arles[8]
  • 2003 Dayanita Singh: Privacy, Nationalgalerie im Hamburger Bahnhof, Berlin[23]
  • 2003 Myself Mona Ahmed, Museum of Asian Art, Berlin
  • 2003 Dayanita Singh: Image/Text (Photographs 1989–2002), Department of Art and Aesthetics. Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi
  • 2002 I am as I am, Myself Mona Ahmed, Scalo Galerie, Zurich
  • 2002 Parsees at Home, Gallery Chemould, Bombay
  • 2002 Bombay to Goa, Kalaghoda Festival, Bombay
  • 2002 Bombay to Goa, Art House India, Goa
  • 2001 Empty Spaces, Frith Street Gallery, London
  • 2000 Demello Vado, Saligao Institute, Goa
  • 2000 I am as I am, Ikon Gallery, Birmingham
  • 2000 Dayanita Singh, Gallery Rodolphe Janssen, Brussels
  • 2000 Dayanita Singh, Tempo Festival, Stockholm
  • 1999 Mona Darling, Venezia Immagine, Venice
  • 1999 Family Portraits, Studio Guenzani, Milan
  • 1998 Family Portraits, Nature Morte, New Delhi
  • 1997 Images from the 90s, Scalo Galerie, Zurich[8]

Group exhibitions[edit]

Kitchen Museum in the National Museum, New Delhi
  • 2013 Biennale di Venezia, German Pavilion.[5]
  • 2011 Paris-Delhi-Bombay, Musée National d'Art Moderne, Paris
  • 2007 Private/Corporate, Sammlung Daimler Chrysler, Berlin
  • 2006 Sub-Contingent, Fondazione Sandretto Re Rebaudengo, Turin
  • 2006 The Eighth Square, Ludwig Museum, Cologne
  • 2006 Cities in Transition, NYC, Boston Hartford[8]
  • 2005 Presence, Sepia International, New York[22]
  • 2005 Edge of Desire, Asia Society, New York[22]
  • 2004 Ten Commandments, Stiftung Deutsches Hygiene-Museum, Dresden
  • 2004 Edge of Desire, art gallery of Western Australia, Perth
  • 2003 Architektur der Obdachlosigkeit, Pinakothek der Moderne, Munich
  • 2003 The Family, Windsor Gallery, Florida
  • 2002 Red Light, Australian Center for Photography, Sydney
  • 2002 Kapital und Karma. Aktuelle Positionen indischer Kunst, Kunsthalle, Wien
  • 2002 Bollywood – Das indische Kino und die Schweiz, Museum für Gestaltung, Zürich
  • 2002 Banaras: The Luminous City, Asia Society, New York
  • 2002 Photo Sphere, Nature Morte, New Delhi[8]
  • 2000 Century City, Tate Modern, London[12]
  • 1999 Another Girl, Another Planet, Greenberg Gallery, New York
  • 1999 Inferno and Paradiso, BildMuseet Umeå, Sweden
  • 1999 Worlds of Work – Images of the South, Musée d'ethnographie, Geneva
  • 1998 Another India, Crealdé School of Art, Orlando, Florida
  • 1998 La Filature, Mulhouse, France
  • 1997 India—A Celebration of Independence,1947–1997, Museum of Fine Arts, Philadelphia
  • 1997 Out of India, Contemporary Art of the South Asian Diaspora, Queens Museum of Art, New York
  • 1997 India—A Contemporary View, Asian Arts Museum, San Francisco
  • 1995 So many worlds—Photographs from DU Magazine, Holderbank, Aargau, Switzerland[8]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Dayanita Singh dazzles at London's Hayward Gallery". The Times of India. 
  2. ^ "Photo fiction". Deccan Herald. 5 February 2012. Retrieved 21 September 2013. 
  3. ^ a b "An insomniac's guide to photography". Mint. 2 December 2011. Retrieved 7 October 2013. 
  4. ^ "Arts 21 Series: CrossCurrents". Arts.21. Retrieved 6 October 2013. 
  5. ^ a b c d e "Infinite possibilities". Financial Times. 26 April 2013. Retrieved 7 October 2013. 
  6. ^ a b "Bio: Dayanita Singh". Frith Street Gallery. Retrieved 7 October 2013. 
  7. ^ "Dayanita Singh – London, at Frith Street". Art in America. 4 April 2013. Retrieved 6 October 2013. 
  8. ^ a b c d e f g h i j "Dayanita Singh – Artist CV". Nature Morte. Retrieved 7 October 2013. 
  9. ^ Sen, Aveek (16 October 2008). "The Eye in Thought – The very rich hours of Dayanita Singh". The Telegraph (Calcutta, India). Retrieved 7 October 2013. 
  10. ^ "Defining contemporary art : 25 years in 200 pivotal artworks". Catalogue. University of Technology, Sydney. Retrieved 7 October 2013. 
  11. ^ "Die Fotografin Dayanita Singh" (in German). Deutsche Welle. 2 October 2013. Retrieved 7 October 2013. 
  12. ^ a b "Postcards from the Edge". Time. 11 October 2010. Retrieved 7 October 2013. 
  13. ^ "Feeling blue". Business Standard. 14 February 2009. Retrieved 7 October 2013. 
  14. ^ Sen, Aveek (19 March 2010). "Night Watch – Tales of the unexpected". The Telegraph (Calcutta, India). Retrieved 7 October 2013. 
  15. ^ Gadihoke, Sabeena (27 August 2010). "Dream Work – The ongoing life of images". The Telegraph (Calcutta, India). Retrieved 7 October 2013. 
  16. ^ http://www.thehindubusinessline.com/features/where-images-do-the-talking/article6242456.ece.  Missing or empty |title= (help)
  17. ^ ""I Don't Want to Be Bound by Anything": Dayanita Singh Brings Her Cerebral Art to London's Frith Street Gallery". Artinfo. 6 July 2012. Retrieved 7 October 2013. 
  18. ^ "The Always Exceptional Condition of Images". Art-iT. 1 February 2012. Retrieved 7 October 2013. 
  19. ^ "Dayanita Singh – Exhibitions". Museum Huis Voor Fotografie. Retrieved 7 October 2013. 
  20. ^ "Dayanita Singh: Dream Villa". Frith Street Gallery. 2008. Retrieved 7 October 2013. 
  21. ^ a b c Aveek Sen (11 January 2007). "A Distance of One's Own – Dayanita Singh's Go Away Closer". The Telegraph (Calcutta, India). Retrieved 7 October 2013. 
  22. ^ a b c Holland Cotter (30 March 2005). "Objects of Repose and Remembrance". New York Times. Retrieved 7 October 2013. 
  23. ^ Gayatri Sinha (30 November 2003). "Documentation of life". The Hindu (Chennai, India). Retrieved 7 October 2013. 

External links[edit]

YouTube[edit]