Department of National Defence (Canada)

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Department of National Defence
Ministère de la Défense nationale
Department of National Defence (Canada).svg
Logo of the Department of National Defence
Department overview
Formed 1923 (1923)
formed by the National Defence Act
Preceding Department Department of Militia and Defence
Department of Naval Services
Air Board
Jurisdiction Government of Canada
Headquarters Major-General George R. Pearkes Building,
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
Employees 28,000[1]
Annual budget US$20.164 billion (2010)[2]
Department executive Robert Fonberg, Deputy Minister of National Defence
Website www.forces.gc.ca

The Department of National Defence (French: Ministère de la Défense nationale), commonly abbreviated as DND, is a Canadian government department responsible for defending Canada's interests and values at home and abroad.[3][4] National Defence is the largest department of the Government of Canada in terms of budget as well as staff. The Department is headed by the Deputy Minister of National Defence, who is the Department’s senior civil servant, and reports directly to the Minister of National Defence.[5] The Department of National Defence exists to aide the minister in carrying out his responsibilities, and acts as the civilian support system for the Canadian Armed Forces.[6][7] Under the National Defence Act, the Canadian Forces is completely separate and distinct from the Department of National Defence.[8]

The Department of National Defence is currently headed by Deputy Minister Richard B. Fadden.[9]

History[edit]

The Department of National Defence was established by the National Defence Act, which merged the Department of Militia and Defence (which was created in 1906 when the British Army withdrew its forces stationed in Canada), the Department of Naval Services (the department responsible for the administration of the Royal Canadian Navy), and the Air Board (which oversaw aviation in Canada). The National Defence Act was passed by the Parliament of Canada on June 28, 1922.[10]

In 1968, the Department of National Defence oversaw the unification of the Canadian Forces. This act merged the three services (the Royal Canadian Navy, Canadian Army, and Royal Canadian Air Force) into a single unified service known as the Canadian Forces. While the services' titles were never formally removed, new titles were brought into official usage. The Royal Canadian Navy was known as Maritime Command, the Army as Force Mobile Command and the Royal Canadian Air Force as Air Command. These actions were taken to achieve cost savings and provide improved command, control, and integration of the military forces.[11]

On 16 August 2011, the traditional titles of the three environmental commands were restored (Royal Canadian Navy, Canadian Army, and Royal Canadian Air Force).[12]

Organization[edit]

Organization Chart - Department of National Defence, Canada.svg

The Department of National Defence is headed by the Deputy Minister of National Defence. Under the Deputy Minister are a variety of associate deputy and assistant deputy ministers who are responsible for various aspects of the department (human resources, policy, etc.). The Deputy Minister is appointed by the Crown (Queen-in-Council) on the advice of the Prime Minister.[13][14]

The Defence Portfolio[edit]

The Canadian Forces are a distinct and separate entity from the Department of National Defence.[13] The Minister of National Defence is responsible for the entire Defence Portfolio comprising several organisations, including the Canadian Forces, the Communications Security Establishment, Defence Research and Development Canada, and the Department of National Defence. The Department is not responsible for all of these organisations itself, but rather exists to support the minister in carrying out all of his duties within the Defence Portfolio.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "FAQ - How many civilians work at DND?". Department of National Defence. February 13, 2012. Retrieved March 8, 2012. 
  2. ^ "Expenditure of the Military of Canada". SIPRI Military expenditure database. Stockholm International Peace Research Institute. Retrieved 21 January 2001. 
  3. ^ "Canada First Defence Strategy -Roles". Department of National Defence. January 13, 2012. Retrieved March 8, 2012. 
  4. ^ "DND Jobs Home". Department of National Defence. August 5, 2011. Retrieved March 8, 2012. 
  5. ^ "About DND -What is the relationship between DND and the Canadian Forces?". Department of National Defence. February 1, 2012. Retrieved March 8, 2012. 
  6. ^ "Civilian Career and Jobs FAQ". Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada. 22 July 2013. Retrieved 27 October 2013. 
  7. ^ "Civilians Supporting the Army". Department of National Defence. August 5, 2011. Retrieved March 8, 2012. 
  8. ^ "Defence Home - Frequently Asked Questions". Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada. 27 July 2013. Retrieved 27 October 2013. 
  9. ^ "Deputy Minister of National Defence - Biography". Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada. 12 September 2013. Retrieved 27 October 2013. 
  10. ^ Gough, Barry (2010). Historical Dictionary of Canada. Scarecrow Press. p. xxxvii. ISBN 0-8108-5496-1. 
  11. ^ Kearney, Mark, Ray, Randy (1999). The Great Canadian Book of Lists. Canada: Dundurn Press Ltd. p. 123. ISBN 0-88882-213-8. 
  12. ^ "Historic names restored". The Maple Leaf 14 (27): 15. September 2011. 
  13. ^ a b "The Deputy Minister of National Defence". Department of National Defence. February 1, 2012. Retrieved March 8, 2012. 
  14. ^ "National Defence Act". Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada. 2012. pp. R.S., c. N–4, s. 7. Retrieved September 2, 2012. 

Coordinates: 45°25′24″N 75°41′21″W / 45.423339°N 75.68924°W / 45.423339; -75.68924

External links[edit]