Dianne Byrum

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Dianne Yvonne Byrum
Member of the Michigan State University Board of Trustees
Incumbent
Assumed office
January 1, 2009
Preceded by G. Scott Romney
Member of the Michigan House of Representatives from the 67th District
In office
January 1, 2003 – December 31, 2006
Preceded by Paul DeWeese
Succeeded by Barb Byrum
Member of the Michigan Senate from the 25th District
In office
January 1, 1995 – December 31, 2002
Preceded by Joe Conroy
Succeeded by Judson Gilbert II
Member of the Michigan House of Representatives from the 68th District
In office
January 1, 1993 – December 31, 1994
Preceded by Shirley Johnson
Succeeded by Lingg Brewer
Member of the Michigan House of Representatives from the 58th District
In office
January 1, 1991 – December 31, 1992
Preceded by Debbie Stabenow
Succeeded by Michael E. Nye
Personal details
Born March 18, 1954
Jackson, Michigan
Nationality American
Political party Democratic
Spouse(s) James Byrum
Children Barb Byrum, James Byrum
Residence Onondaga Township, Michigan
Alma mater Michigan State University
Occupation Partner, Byrum & Fisk Advocacy Communications
Website Byrum & Fisk Advocacy Communications

Dianne Yvonne Byrum (born March 18, 1954[1]) is a Democratic politician from the U.S. state of Michigan. She resides in Onondaga Township in Ingham County. She is now a partner with Byrum & Fisk Advocacy Communications, an East Lansing, Mich.-based public relations firm that she founded with Mark Fisk, the former Communications Director for the Michigan House Democratic Caucus.

Byrum has been elected to numerous public offices, most recently as a member of the Michigan State University Board of Trustees. Prior to that, Byrum served on the Michigan State House of Representatives from the 67th District, where she served as the first-ever woman Democratic House Leader.[2] Byrum was term limited out of that office at the end of 2006. Her daughter, Barb Byrum, was elected to replace her in the House of Representatives.

Byrum was previously elected to serve two terms in the Michigan House of Representatives from the 58th District, serving from 1991 to 1994. She then served in the Michigan Senate representing the 25th District, from 1995 to 2002. She was also an Ingham County Commissioner from 1983 to 1990. In 2000, she ran for a seat in the U.S. House of Representatives to represent Michigan's 8th Congressional district. She lost to Republican Mike Rogers by only 111 votes, making it the closest Congressional election in the United States that year.[3]

Byrum served as spokeswoman for the Michigan Coalition for Compassionate Care,[4] the organization that successfully passed a ballot initiative allowing the medical use of marijuana in Michigan on Nov. 4, 2008.

She also served as spokeswoman for Reform Michigan Government Now!, a Hastings, Michigan-based group that attempted to reform Michigan's government through a 2008 ballot proposal.[5]

Byrum served as Treasurer of the Michigan Democratic Party from 2007 until 2009.

Since 2007, Byrum has served as Co-Director of the Michigan Public Leadership Program.

Electoral history[edit]

Michigan State University Board of Trustees election 2008
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Dianne Byrum 2,186,120 26 4
Democratic Diann Woodard 2,104,266 25 3
Republican G. Scott Romney 1,793,777 22 -3
Republican Lisa Bouchard 1,725,884 21 -4
Michigan House of Representatives election 2004 (District 67)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Dianne Byrum (Incumbent) 25,709 54.8 10.6
Republican Beth Chandler 21,205 44.2
Michigan House of Representatives election 2002 (District 67)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Dianne Byrum 19,138 58.9 17.8
Republican Donald Vickers 13,331 41.1
U.S. House of Representatives election 2000 (District 8)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Dianne Byrum 145,079 48.7
Republican Mike Rogers 145,190 48.8 .1
Michigan Senate election 1998 (District 25)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Dianne Byrum (Incumbent) 55,200 68.1 36.2
Republican Pat Gallagher 25,816 31.9

References[edit]

External links[edit]